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New to making data backups, do I have this right?

Hi!

So, I'm trying to be smart and back up my data, since SSDs, as I understand it, don't give you much of a warning before they go out, and it's generally good practice. So I got 2 external drives (redundancy). The only question is: what is the most efficient way to actually do it?
I could obviously just copy the folders over, and click "don't overwrite" every subsequent time, but There Must Be A Better Way.

Windows 10 has a backup function, but I read a few articles claiming that it can be unreliable, so I might be better off doing it the old-fashioned way described above? I don't need to clone my entire drive, it's "just" documents, media, etc

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Posts

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    If you're just backing up documents and media, the monthly copy to an external drive is probably fine. If you want to be more thorough you can get software like Acronis True Image which makes your external HDD act like a Mac's Time Machine doing hourly, daily, weekly, and monthly backups.

    On the topic of redundancy: having two drives is good, but not really necessary. The more important thing is to have a backup offsite like Google Drive, OneDrive, Carbonite, or whatever your backup service of choice is. The external HDD is great, but it won't save your data if your house burns down.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    Aridholel_vicio
  • el_vicioel_vicio Registered User regular
    edited January 12
    That's true. Maybe this is old-man-me talking, but I'm hesitant to just give my docs and data to Google or sth to store and back it up

    el_vicio on
    5FEdw1A.png
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    You're not wrong to feel that way, especially when we're talking about Google. If it makes you feel better, Carbonite is very well regarded, and Microsoft seems to have a great record with OneDrive.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    el_vicio
  • el_vicioel_vicio Registered User regular
    OneDrive looks like the best solution, then. I'll check out the privacy policy first, obv

    thanks for the replies!

    5FEdw1A.png
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Keep in mind the expense of each one. It's not horrible, but online storage has a certain cost attached.

    You do get 1TB of storage on OneDrive if you have an active Office subscription though, so there's that.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    edited January 13
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    You're not wrong to feel that way, especially when we're talking about Google. If it makes you feel better, Carbonite is very well regarded, and Microsoft seems to have a great record with OneDrive.

    OneDrive is not backup, it's file synchronization. OneDrive for Business has some additional bulk restore features that approach a normal backup solution, but those are still limited to 30 days. But if you're using the regular version of OneDrive, versioning won't cover all possibilities or use cases and you'd still want a proper backup solution on top of it. It's fine for reverting changes to single files or known recent deletions but bad for bulk operations or long term storage or recovery.

    SiliconStew on
    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    Frem
  • el_vicioel_vicio Registered User regular
    That's good to know, thanks. Hrm. Back to google, I guess

    5FEdw1A.png
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    You're not wrong to feel that way, especially when we're talking about Google. If it makes you feel better, Carbonite is very well regarded, and Microsoft seems to have a great record with OneDrive.

    OneDrive is not backup, it's file synchronization. OneDrive for Business has some additional bulk restore features that approach a normal backup solution, but those are still limited to 30 days. But if you're using the regular version of OneDrive, versioning won't cover all possibilities or use cases and you'd still want a proper backup solution on top of it. It's fine for reverting changes to single files or known recent deletions but bad for bulk operations or long term storage or recovery.

    If you're manually uploading to OneDrive it's no different than anything else. The versioning is fine but it didn't sound like that's what OP was looking for.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    Synthesis
  • thatassemblyguythatassemblyguy RESIST. Registered User regular
    Carbonite and Backblaze both let you manage your own key for on-device encryption of the back-up.

    I'm not a fan of BackBlaze for the moment because it's an exclusion-only back-up program vs. a select-what-folder-you-want back-up program, so it will basically back-up any telematics or other perma-temporary-generated-shit-Microsoft-creates-to-track-you in Windows 10.

    If you're just going to use the external drives. Write a batch script, or setup a scheduled task to do the copy for you with some parameters.

    The downside to all of these solutions is that none of them actually tell you if the data you've backed up has been corrupted or not. If you want to be super proactive about it; make some md5 sums for every file you back-up, and have the batch script check for a previous md5 of the file, if the file has the same meta-data and size (i.e., it hasn't been touched since the last back-up). That way you will get a warning when bits have rotted in the latest back-up copy, so you can do a manual restore of any corrupted files.

    There are even more advanced things to do if you wanted to be paranoid about your files, but honestly the easier thing to do at that point is not do a back-up but have your files live on a Dropbox/Google Drive/OneDrive/iCloud share (within an encrypted container of course).

  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    Backblaze is fine now that it's gone unlimited storage. Plans are pretty cheap too.
    I just set my father in law up on it with his new machine.

    I personally use Spideroak but that will be changing next year because their software is just god awful. I need to find a multi-TB backup that has a good software suite that supports networked drives (mapped/mounted drives).


    I also say this everytime this topic comes up so I apologize in advance if it sounds dickish.

    You WILL NOT care that google or whomever didn't have your private super secret data when you lose it in a fire or flood. You would give anything to anyone to get those family photo's and documents and voicemails from deceased loved ones.
    It's absolutely NOT a backup if you keep an external drive or pile of DVD's next to the computer with the data.
    At a MINIMUM you should have an offsite backup of "don't lose" files with a friend or other family member if you don't trust the "cloud".
    Myself, I trust EvilCorp to take better care of my data than my sister.

    Again, sorry for how that sounds but I worked for years at a computer store dealing with crying people who've lost everything and have even lost irreplaceable photo's myself. The pain of that trumps virtually everything else.

    thatassemblyguy
  • wunderbarwunderbar What Have I Done? Registered User regular
    I switched from carbonite to backblaze about 6 months ago. Carbonite throttles upload speeds pretty hard, which is an issue if you're uploading a lot.

    Honestly, for $60USD/year to back up literally your entire computer, backblaze is a really good deal. You just set it and forget it, and never have to think about it again.

    also, Google and Microsoft collect the same kind of data, and do a lot of the same things with it. If someone is afraid of putting data into google's servers, you should be just as afraid of putting it into Microsoft's. The only reason people freak out more about Google is because, generally, Google just already has a larger base of that data because their services are a billion times more popular than microsoft's.

    XBL: thewunderbar PSN: thewunderbar NNID: thewunderbar Steam: wunderbar87 Twitter: wunderbar
    AridholthatassemblyguyFrem
  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    One good thing about Microsoft, Google & Amazon for data backups is the fact that they're really unlikely to just turn the lights off one day and shut down with all your stuff.

    Shadowfirethatassemblyguy
  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    I decided to check out backblaze B2 for my synology NAS and I have to say I'm really impressed with Backblaze.
    It was dead easy to setup and the configuration options for your backups are great.

    Pricing is pretty standard and I estimate I'll save about 30% from spideroak since 99% of my use case is backup and not retrieval.

  • el_vicioel_vicio Registered User regular
    edited January 16
    Hr
    Carbonite and Backblaze both let you manage your own key for on-device encryption of the back-up.

    I'm not a fan of BackBlaze for the moment because it's an exclusion-only back-up program vs. a select-what-folder-you-want back-up program, so it will basically back-up any telematics or other perma-temporary-generated-shit-Microsoft-creates-to-track-you in Windows 10.

    If you're just going to use the external drives. Write a batch script, or setup a scheduled task to do the copy for you with some parameters.

    The downside to all of these solutions is that none of them actually tell you if the data you've backed up has been corrupted or not. If you want to be super proactive about it; make some md5 sums for every file you back-up, and have the batch script check for a previous md5 of the file, if the file has the same meta-data and size (i.e., it hasn't been touched since the last back-up). That way you will get a warning when bits have rotted in the latest back-up copy, so you can do a manual restore of any corrupted files.

    There are even more advanced things to do if you wanted to be paranoid about your files, but honestly the easier thing to do at that point is not do a back-up but have your files live on a Dropbox/Google Drive/OneDrive/iCloud share (within an encrypted container of course).

    this will sound dumb

    but by encrypted container, do you mean something like a simple 7zip with a decent password that I then back up?
    (and then hope that I never forget a weird character string)

    el_vicio on
    5FEdw1A.png
  • DratatooDratatoo Registered User regular
    I use Veeam Backup (the free version) and save my stuff on two external HDs. I deposit one of the two HDs at work. Veeam usually saves the backups as images and you can't read the data directly - but it also supports backing up as plain readable files if you prefer that.

    Aridhol
  • thatassemblyguythatassemblyguy RESIST. Registered User regular
    el_vicio wrote: »
    Carbonite and Backblaze both let you manage your own key for on-device encryption of the back-up.

    I'm not a fan of BackBlaze for the moment because it's an exclusion-only back-up program vs. a select-what-folder-you-want back-up program, so it will basically back-up any telematics or other perma-temporary-generated-shit-Microsoft-creates-to-track-you in Windows 10.

    If you're just going to use the external drives. Write a batch script, or setup a scheduled task to do the copy for you with some parameters.

    The downside to all of these solutions is that none of them actually tell you if the data you've backed up has been corrupted or not. If you want to be super proactive about it; make some md5 sums for every file you back-up, and have the batch script check for a previous md5 of the file, if the file has the same meta-data and size (i.e., it hasn't been touched since the last back-up). That way you will get a warning when bits have rotted in the latest back-up copy, so you can do a manual restore of any corrupted files.

    There are even more advanced things to do if you wanted to be paranoid about your files, but honestly the easier thing to do at that point is not do a back-up but have your files live on a Dropbox/Google Drive/OneDrive/iCloud share (within an encrypted container of course).

    this will sound dumb

    but by encrypted container, do you mean something like a simple 7zip with a decent password that I then back up?
    (and then hope that I never forget a weird character string)

    As a very basic encryption, yes, but it's incredibly manual (so prone to human error in process, "Crap, did I decrypt/access that zip file on the remote device, so now there are unencrypted temporary copies on the remote server?", or "Crap, I forgot to encrypt that last archive before uploading.")

    No matter the encryption, you're always making sure you don't forget or lose the weird character string.

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