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Corpses and Coteries: The Tabletop Games Thread Rises

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Posts

  • astrobstrdastrobstrd So full of mercy... Registered User regular
    I may have a lot of wealth, but I'd trade it all for just a little more...

    Selling the Scream Podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeremy-donaldson
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    I could see a dragon having a decoy hoard of copper pieces to pull this with, I think even the good types of D&D dragons traditionally care about their real hoards too much to just let murderhobos steal them for no reason though. Non-canon dragon behavior? Not on my watch!

    BahamutZERO.gif
  • DepressperadoDepressperado I just wanted to see you laughing in the pizza rainRegistered User regular
    how much time do you think old dragons spend in humanoid form

    like, how fuckin' hard must it be to manage a horde or bring like, the local village's shitty offering of 600 copper pieces and an old silver tiara to the horde using your imprecise giant claws?

    or maybe they just Mage Hand a lot of times, or Unseen Servant, just "make this one big pile and don't break anything."

  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    only perverts spend a lot of time shapeshifted
    hanging out with tiny, smelly, wrinkly hairless apes of various sizes and colors? frankly disgusting

    BahamutZERO.gif
  • Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    To offset the bird person in our party who is obsessed with cash, my bird person mostly doesn't understand its value and would much rather collect weird gadgets and knickknacks, and that's fun to do

  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Grey Ghost wrote: »
    To offset the bird person in our party who is obsessed with cash, my bird person mostly doesn't understand its value and would much rather collect weird gadgets and knickknacks, and that's fun to do

    They love stealing keys, not to open anything with them, but because they jingle and sparkle.

  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Magpie birdperson

  • StiltsStilts Registered User regular
    Grey Ghost wrote: »
    To offset the bird person in our party who is obsessed with cash, my bird person mostly doesn't understand its value and would much rather collect weird gadgets and knickknacks, and that's fun to do

    One of the players in my Ravnica campaign is a Gruul centaur who likes collecting skulls of different animals he has defeated.

    Not to intimidate anyone. He just thinks they look cool.

    IKknkhU.gif
  • DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Stilts wrote: »
    Grey Ghost wrote: »
    To offset the bird person in our party who is obsessed with cash, my bird person mostly doesn't understand its value and would much rather collect weird gadgets and knickknacks, and that's fun to do

    One of the players in my Ravnica campaign is a Gruul centaur who likes collecting skulls of different animals he has defeated.

    Not to intimidate anyone. He just thinks they look cool.

    My halfling necromancer has been taking claws from neat beasts we've killed to decorate his necklace with. So far he has a manticore claw and an owlbear claw on there

    JtgVX0H.png
  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    Act 2 of ALIEN had the first casualties.

    We went from 5 crew members to 2.

    Notable moments: The captain only *just* managing to avoid emptying her flamethrower down a vent that the motion tracker told her was trouble. It was just a can set to roll by the Alien.

    Our drug addicted pilot sneaking out of the bridge to 'catch her breath' and heading to the med lab. Ending about as well as any one who goes off alone in a horror film and has a notable vice.

    The Cronus's security specialist with one synthetic arm getting her other real arm ripped off by an abomination before emptying a shotgun into it's head, cocking each shot against the floor.

  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    Like I'm just saying that as a player in a D&D game, if I found a cave with a million platinum worth of copper, I'd go "Eh, don't need it"

  • DepressperadoDepressperado I just wanted to see you laughing in the pizza rainRegistered User regular
    "I'm gonna take thiiii-" *scoops up enough copper to fill the obligatory Bag of Holding* "-iiis much."

    "I can get it exchanged at the bank later. Oh shit, do I have to wrap my own coins?"

  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Maddoc wrote: »
    Like I'm just saying that as a player in a D&D game, if I found a cave with a million platinum worth of copper, I'd go "Eh, don't need it"

    So let's see, 100 copper is a gold, and 10 gold is a plat.

    That's literally a billion cp. That's basically an entire copper mine.

  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    Adventure location: A mine where someone used a ritual to mint all the ore in it but didn't think about how much of a pain that would be to shift still.

  • BionicPenguinBionicPenguin Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Maddoc wrote: »
    Like I'm just saying that as a player in a D&D game, if I found a cave with a million platinum worth of copper, I'd go "Eh, don't need it"

    So let's see, 100 copper is a gold, and 10 gold is a plat.

    That's literally a billion cp. That's basically an entire copper mine.

    It's a big cave.

  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    That would fuck up inflation rates as well

    The real adventure is working out how to use that wealth most effectively

    Because nothing screams “fun adventure” like macroeconomics and commodity trading

    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    "I'm gonna take thiiii-" *scoops up enough copper to fill the obligatory Bag of Holding* "-iiis much."

    "I can get it exchanged at the bank later. Oh shit, do I have to wrap my own coins?"

    Now how much cash is that, actually...? Bags of holding do have limits...

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  • ElddrikElddrik Registered User regular
    Polaritie wrote: »
    "I'm gonna take thiiii-" *scoops up enough copper to fill the obligatory Bag of Holding* "-iiis much."

    "I can get it exchanged at the bank later. Oh shit, do I have to wrap my own coins?"

    Now how much cash is that, actually...? Bags of holding do have limits...

    A 5E bag of holding holds 500 pounds (or 64 cubic feet), and 50 coins weighs a pound in 5E.

    So it can hold 50*500 = 25,000 coins, which in copper would be worth 250 gp.

    To put this in scale with a very expensive but mundane item, it would take 6 bags of holding full of copper pieces to afford a suit of plate mail.

  • never dienever die Registered User regular
    That would fuck up inflation rates as well

    The real adventure is working out how to use that wealth most effectively

    Because nothing screams “fun adventure” like macroeconomics and commodity trading

    That sounds actually like a fun idea to me.

  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    I've gone over this before, but money is essentially meaningless to 5E players beyond like... third level

  • DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Maddoc wrote: »
    I've gone over this before, but money is essentially meaningless to 5E players beyond like... third level

    Sure, but it's shiny and I needs it

    JtgVX0H.png
  • astrobstrdastrobstrd So full of mercy... Registered User regular
    For all the crap rightfully dumped on 3.x for making gear feel like just another min/max slider and stripping magic of any wonder, at least it did make cash worth pursuing at high levels.

    Selling the Scream Podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeremy-donaldson
  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    To be clear, I don't think money being less useful is inherently a flaw.

    Cash is a boring reward, even when you can do stuff with it

  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    there is something to the old xp=gp thing

    BahamutZERO.gif
  • PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    I like RPG systems where you have to pay money to learn new and/or stronger abilities, so you have a choice between bettering your sword or picking up a fancy new maneuver.

  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    I don't like shopping in RPGs. Or, well, anywhere. If I need a thing, just give me a thing. Don't make me jump through bullshit hoops.

    Which also applies to adventure League, which basically everybody, including the DMs in my group, immediately abandoned.

  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    never die wrote: »
    That would fuck up inflation rates as well

    The real adventure is working out how to use that wealth most effectively

    Because nothing screams “fun adventure” like macroeconomics and commodity trading

    That sounds actually like a fun idea to me.

    Yeah, me too

    I'm thinking some kind of plan which involves manipulating the local ruler into decreeing that all currency is to be replaced, maybe by spreading rumours of widespread forgery, then turning up at every mint with as much as the party can carry, then split up and exchange the new cash in foreign lands in the hope that you can beat the Forex information due to the confusion

    I pity the GM who would have to work that plot out

    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    We had the third regular session of my Star Trek game tonight, after the playtest/prologue, and I'm really happy with how it went.

    The crew was sent to investigate the disappearance of a Federation anthropologist on a pre-warp planet whose population are chemically addicted to their own adrenal secretions - a planet of adrenaline junkies. Their government is a casinocracy, with leaders chosen by lottery, and all questions are settled with contests, bets, and games of chance, with all bets overseen and debts enforced by the high priests: the Church of the Book, or "Bookers."

    The players investigated, followed in the missing woman's footsteps, made some very astute guesses about what might be really going on (some correct, some that made me go "damn, I wish I'd thought of that") and discovered that to reach her they will have to participate in...the Games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dnZHea_TI0

    I feel like the game is really coming together. It's a big group (6 people), so I have to do a bit more juggling that I'm used to, but everyone seems to be taking to the system and, more importantly, their characters are already becoming sharply defined (both in each player's head and in each other's).They're already developing little bits and recurring gags and interactions.

    The captain is kind of a Chuck Yeager, "The Right Stuff" test pilot/astronaut guy who likes going fast. We began tonight's story with a TV-style cold open where he'd talked the entire bridge crew into joining him on the holodeck for a Formula 1 race. He and the first officer, who's this very cool, collected, hypercompetent woman, have a sort of serious mom/cool dad dynamic with the rest of the crew, especially the chief of security, who's an impulsive Betazoid woman.

    She, in turn, has kind of a suspicious friction with the science officer, a jovial Cardassian ex-spy who seems untrustworthy but really just has "resting sinister face." He keeps a carnivorous plant in his quarters that he sings to, he wears a ritual dagger, he drinks his kanar liquor out of a chalice for some reason ("Why does it have to be a chalice?" "Why, because chalices are for kanar, of course!") He's already developing a chemistry with the chief engineer, an ex-Borg who's kind of the ultimate straight man to the Cardassian's antics.

    I feel like we're settling into a groove where I just feed the players the setup and they run with it, and it's ending up feeling very Star Trek in exactly the way I was hoping for. There's still lots to do; for instance, I'm still learning, as a GM, to enforce a firmer, more TV-paced structure, with harder cuts between scenes. I'm more used to running more free-form games where I'd just kind of wait for the players to decide when a scene ended ("okay, I guess we don't need any more from this guy, let's head out to the dungeon"). Here, I'm more trying to stay alert for good exit lines or scene beats, then going CUT and moving on to the next setup ("you enter the abandoned warehouse"). It's an art, and I'm getting the hang of it.

    rRwz9.gif
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    In Conan we have an accepted group thing where we say that each adventure we'll get paid and try to loot as much shit as we can, and then we assume that we spend/lose/etc all our money bar a few scraps in downtime

    So we always start with "fuck we've got no money" which is very in genre. But we also refuse to actually swear allegiance to anyone cos that's also in genre. Free men, comrades, fighting to live like Kings if only for a night etc

  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    a
    Solar wrote: »
    In Conan we have an accepted group thing where we say that each adventure we'll get paid and try to loot as much shit as we can, and then we assume that we spend/lose/etc all our money bar a few scraps in downtime

    So we always start with "fuck we've got no money" which is very in genre. But we also refuse to actually swear allegiance to anyone cos that's also in genre. Free men, comrades, fighting to live like Kings if only for a night etc

    I think at least one of the Conan or Conan-alike games (maybe The Riddle of Steel?) had that as an explicit mechanic, where your character healed and gained mechanical advancements between sessions by spending money on carousing.

    rRwz9.gif
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    You can spend money on various things in the carousing phase but our GM basically just lets us buy the various little bits and pieces we need (new axe as the last one disappeared into the mouth of a snake monster etc) and then we scratch all the gold off as beer money, keep like 2D6 each and go into the next session poor. There are mechanics but we don't really use them.

    Once we bought like, loads of shit to trade and decided it all sunk when our barge got attacked by an enraged hippo, Bel curse the bastard.

  • DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    So our last session ended with us getting a ride in a flying wizard's tower. I'm going to have my lizardfolk ranger spend the 4 days of travel time asking the wizard if they know anything about spelljamming and if so she'll ask if they know of any functioning Spelljammer ships in Faerun.

    Lengthy backstory that I might have already posted about in here, but my memory is shit and I'm too lazy to go look:
    Because when I was coming up with this character's backstory I discovered that way back in 2e in the Spelljammer campaign setting, Faerun's star system had a gas giant as the planet second closest to the sun named Coliar, and it had floating islands inhabited by lizardfolk, aarakocra, and dragons. The lizardfolk used spelljamming ships not for trade but to take their eggs close to the sun to hatch (made for stronger, faster, smarter lizardfolk), so I figured my ranger was part of a spelljammer crew (hence her "sailor" background) and the usual "got attacked and crashed on Faerun" thing happened and she's trying to find a way home while surviving on this strange planet.

    JtgVX0H.png
  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    a
    Solar wrote: »
    In Conan we have an accepted group thing where we say that each adventure we'll get paid and try to loot as much shit as we can, and then we assume that we spend/lose/etc all our money bar a few scraps in downtime

    So we always start with "fuck we've got no money" which is very in genre. But we also refuse to actually swear allegiance to anyone cos that's also in genre. Free men, comrades, fighting to live like Kings if only for a night etc

    I think at least one of the Conan or Conan-alike games (maybe The Riddle of Steel?) had that as an explicit mechanic, where your character healed and gained mechanical advancements between sessions by spending money on carousing.

    I've workshopped something similar for Cowboy Bebop style games:

    Any cash between adventures vanishes in bills and carousing. However you're hardly ever stopped from buying anything. You can always go into debt and any debts left at the end of a session manifest in stuff like getting restricted access to services (Your weapon guy has stopped letting you just promise to pay him back), plot hooks for next session (the hospital will forgive you for that time you came in half drunk and shot if you go collect some other debts from wealthy folk who think skipping planet will work) or threats (That car rental agency honestly just got their shady brother in law and a few guys together to break your knee caps after you turned the car into a flaming wreck).

    Maybe make it so XP is gained from blowing money on carousing so you have an incentive to just let debts ride even if you can re-pay them.

  • BucketmanBucketman Call me SkraggRegistered User regular
    Does anyone know what time books on DnD Beyond unlock?

  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    I know at least one of the various Forged in the Dark games has the whole money beyond a certain point just goes away during downtime rule

    I mean even Blades kind of does that at its base level, because once you stockpile that money it doesn't really do you any active good anymore

  • BlarghyBlarghy Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    I don't like shopping in RPGs. Or, well, anywhere. If I need a thing, just give me a thing. Don't make me jump through bullshit hoops.

    Which also applies to adventure League, which basically everybody, including the DMs in my group, immediately abandoned.

    Well, the thing is that money has been a prime adventuring motive in the editions leading up to 5e and is really easy for most players to relate to anyway. Hell, its actually a great motivating factor in-character to get a disparate band of adventurers together in the first place. So, while there are certainly situations where if you require magic items in a system order to just keep up, it can be a chore to always make sure that the PCs are collecting the correct amount money to pay for them and have the opportunities to do so -- going too far in the opposite direction of making money completely pointless strips also strips away a large source of easily relatable excitement.

  • MsAnthropyMsAnthropy The Lady of Pain Breaks the Rhythm, Breaks the Rhythm, Breaks the Rhythm The City of FlowersRegistered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    We had the third regular session of my Star Trek game tonight, after the playtest/prologue, and I'm really happy with how it went.

    The crew was sent to investigate the disappearance of a Federation anthropologist on a pre-warp planet whose population are chemically addicted to their own adrenal secretions - a planet of adrenaline junkies. Their government is a casinocracy, with leaders chosen by lottery, and all questions are settled with contests, bets, and games of chance, with all bets overseen and debts enforced by the high priests: the Church of the Book, or "Bookers."

    The players investigated, followed in the missing woman's footsteps, made some very astute guesses about what might be really going on (some correct, some that made me go "damn, I wish I'd thought of that") and discovered that to reach her they will have to participate in...the Games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dnZHea_TI0

    I feel like the game is really coming together. It's a big group (6 people), so I have to do a bit more juggling that I'm used to, but everyone seems to be taking to the system and, more importantly, their characters are already becoming sharply defined (both in each player's head and in each other's).They're already developing little bits and recurring gags and interactions.

    The captain is kind of a Chuck Yeager, "The Right Stuff" test pilot/astronaut guy who likes going fast. We began tonight's story with a TV-style cold open where he'd talked the entire bridge crew into joining him on the holodeck for a Formula 1 race. He and the first officer, who's this very cool, collected, hypercompetent woman, have a sort of serious mom/cool dad dynamic with the rest of the crew, especially the chief of security, who's an impulsive Betazoid woman.

    She, in turn, has kind of a suspicious friction with the science officer, a jovial Cardassian ex-spy who seems untrustworthy but really just has "resting sinister face." He keeps a carnivorous plant in his quarters that he sings to, he wears a ritual dagger, he drinks his kanar liquor out of a chalice for some reason ("Why does it have to be a chalice?" "Why, because chalices are for kanar, of course!") He's already developing a chemistry with the chief engineer, an ex-Borg who's kind of the ultimate straight man to the Cardassian's antics.

    I feel like we're settling into a groove where I just feed the players the setup and they run with it, and it's ending up feeling very Star Trek in exactly the way I was hoping for. There's still lots to do; for instance, I'm still learning, as a GM, to enforce a firmer, more TV-paced structure, with harder cuts between scenes. I'm more used to running more free-form games where I'd just kind of wait for the players to decide when a scene ended ("okay, I guess we don't need any more from this guy, let's head out to the dungeon"). Here, I'm more trying to stay alert for good exit lines or scene beats, then going CUT and moving on to the next setup ("you enter the abandoned warehouse"). It's an art, and I'm getting the hang of it.

    As player of the XO in the game, I have to say that I am really digging all of the character dynamics and how everyone just seems to naturally flow into patterns that feel like Trek. On a selfish note, I also look forward to seeing how my character is different when she is off duty—fully expect to see other characters shocked to find out she actually likes fun.

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    "The only real politics I knew was that if a guy liked Hitler, I’d beat the stuffing out of him and that would be it." -- Jack Kirby
  • BucketmanBucketman Call me SkraggRegistered User regular
    I feel like I accidentally railroaded my group into a decision this week. They were told to remove this flying castle as a threat. they found its power source, they realized they could remove the power source and destroy the castle/crash it in the ground. Keep in mind its been a little over a month since last we played, and only 1 of the 4 of them takes any notes. Now its been over a month since we've played but only a few hours in game. So I reminded them that their characters recalled they were not told to destroy the castle, but to eliminate it a threat. Now this is 3 of their first time playing any RPG like this, so I wanted to stress that they have options. When asked "What could we do besides destroy it?" I said "Well as an example you could kill everyone inside (including a CR 11 Djinn) and steal the castle, or destroy it, or just turn it over to the earth elementals that gave you this task or you could destroy it, there are possibilities!" and they went "Oh I guess he wants us to kill the Djinn" which no. That was just an option I gave them because they are not super use to thinking creatively.

    To their credit they did a really good job in that fight that I pulled out of my ass, and used a surprising amount of good tactics and used abilities smartly. But I feel like they accidentally took my word as gospel.

  • admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Bucketman wrote: »
    I feel like I accidentally railroaded my group into a decision this week. They were told to remove this flying castle as a threat. they found its power source, they realized they could remove the power source and destroy the castle/crash it in the ground. Keep in mind its been a little over a month since last we played, and only 1 of the 4 of them takes any notes. Now its been over a month since we've played but only a few hours in game. So I reminded them that their characters recalled they were not told to destroy the castle, but to eliminate it a threat. Now this is 3 of their first time playing any RPG like this, so I wanted to stress that they have options. When asked "What could we do besides destroy it?" I said "Well as an example you could kill everyone inside (including a CR 11 Djinn) and steal the castle, or destroy it, or just turn it over to the earth elementals that gave you this task or you could destroy it, there are possibilities!" and they went "Oh I guess he wants us to kill the Djinn" which no. That was just an option I gave them because they are not super use to thinking creatively.

    To their credit they did a really good job in that fight that I pulled out of my ass, and used a surprising amount of good tactics and used abilities smartly. But I feel like they accidentally took my word as gospel.

    This is pretty common with newer players and imo the best way to deal with it is now, when they've already gotten through the choice, talk to them out of game and be like "that was a rad fight and you accomplished your objectives, but just so you know there were other ways to deal with that and future situations will be similar. I'll always leave it open to your creativity, and you can feel free to ask as many memory refresh/clarifying questions as you need."

    The latter in particular -- encouraging your players to ask clarifying questions and "I don't remember exactly..." questions is vital with new players, as they often expect the DM to be, if not actively antagonistic, closed off and reticent to share.

  • Desert LeviathanDesert Leviathan Registered User regular
    All this talk of extra money and downtime expenses has got me thinking, and I want to do an upgradeable home base kind of thing for my next campaign.

    It'll probably be a 5e AcqInc franchise game, because I've played in a couple now and they've given me ideas for running one. And that takes care of why the PCs have this huge run-down house that they can fix and upgrade - it's the company base. That also means that the money they'd be spending on it would be mainly company funds at first, which would still be income the PCs are responsible for generating, but it would wind up in a separate account than their personal GP totals, so there'd be less psychological incentive to hoard.

    I'm thinking upgrades would fit into one or more of the following categories:
    - Luxury: You make the manor nicer to actually live in, and gain small incentives to take your Long Rest there.
    - Utility: You add upgrades that make it easier to perform a specific skill, task, or process.
    - Security: You harden the manor against intrusion. At low levels this is just normal security stuff, but at the high end you would actually transform the manor into a fort.
    - Prosperity: You transform part of the manor into a self-sustaining income source, possibly enough to mitigate upkeep costs entirely and make a little extra after.
    - Community: You add a feature that improves your relationship with your neighbors (who, as a default, don't like AcqInc and Adventurers all that much). There's a general reputation to improve, and then specific factions in the village that some upgrades would court individually.
    - Hospitality: You expand the number of people the manor can house, which is vital if other upgrades require staff to operate and you can't find someone with the necessary skill set who already lives nearby.

    Each upgrade will have a specific function, but also contribute to an overall rating in these categories that offers its own benefits. Generally, good upgrades will involve a trade-off. For example, you add an enchanted hedge maze to the grounds, giving a moderate boost to Security, but losing a little bit of Hospitality because some of your staff gets lost on the way to work every morning. You add a sweet alchemy lab for a big boost in Utility, but the toxic runoff into the lake torpedoes your Community rank. You transform your kitchen and dining room into a world-class restaurant for a boost in Prosperity, but all the foot traffic is noisy and diminishes the Luxury of the manor.

    Realizing lately that I don't really trust or respect basically any of the moderators here. So, good luck with life, friends! Hit me up on Twitter @DesertLeviathan
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