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Homeowner/House Thread: It's going to cost how much, now?

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Posts

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    On the one hand, if you bathe correctly and responsibly, there's next to no splashback or water leaking of any kind. You just waterproof everything around it anyways because, well accidents happen.

    On the other hand, I don't see a shower curtain. That water is going everywhere.

    On the third hand, and the most important hand. Is that an electric baseboard heater under the bathtub?!

    Looks like a hot water register.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular

    Apparently this isn't super uncommon and it's speculated that there's a requirement for height over sceptic tank, so that's the easiest way to reach it.

  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Jragghen wrote: »
    This is making me realize that D&D missed the amazement which was this house posted over on SE++, that everyone here needs to experience if you didn't see it over there.

    Why... Why is there a down spout coming horizontally out of the siding?

  • BlackDragon480BlackDragon480 Bluster Kerfuffle Master of Windy ImportRegistered User regular
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Peacocks are loud dickheads and all people really want is a fan of the feathers to go "ooooooh"
    Just buy some feathers, stick em on some wood and save your money.

    First they came for the Muslims and we said...NOT TODAY MOTHERFUCKERS!
    Aridhol
  • OptyOpty Registered User regular
    Jragghen wrote: »

    Apparently this isn't super uncommon and it's speculated that there's a requirement for height over sceptic tank, so that's the easiest way to reach it.

    It's like when a 5 bedroom house advertises itself as a 3 bedroom because the septic tank is only rated for a 3 bedroom house.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Mortious wrote: »
    Mortious wrote: »
    Getting out of a nice warn bath onto a nice soft carpet seems like it would be really nice for the first time you use it.

    My grandparents had a carpeted bathroom. I could never figure out the logic there.

    There has to be a way to get it to work though.

    The idea of stepping out of a shower and then rolling around on the floor to dry yourself is appealing.

    No cold tiles, less slipperly etc.

    Maybe something like fitted sheets, but for carpets so they can be replaced and washed?

    No sure if trolling.

    Bath mats are a thing; or do you ice skate around the bathroom getting out of your shower?

  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Opty wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »

    Apparently this isn't super uncommon and it's speculated that there's a requirement for height over sceptic tank, so that's the easiest way to reach it.

    It's like when a 5 bedroom house advertises itself as a 3 bedroom because the septic tank is only rated for a 3 bedroom house.

    Wait, are septic tanks rated based on a poop per person metric?

    schuss
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    So this process involves enough paperwork that I feel like I have a second job, but we’re moving forward! House inspection on Monday revealed some issues, but nothing catastrophic.

    Which leads to a question - what sort of repairs are reasonable to ask for, and is there any advice on how to handle the negotiations here? Do we go in asking for a larger set of repairs than we expect so we have some room to negotiate, or is taking a more genuine approach recommended (my instinct, but my wife’s a better negotiator).

    The big things we’re looking at are replacing a small but inconvenient section of old rotting pressboard siding with hardiplank, some questionable support posts under the back and front porch, closing up a hole under the eaves of the roof where it looks like rodents had a field day, and correcting whatever is going on with the cloth tied around an otherwise uncovered copper pipe in the basement.

    Nothing extreme, but some of these are definitely big jobs, and given that the previous owners seemed happy to paint over wood rotten enough to stick a finger into, we really don’t want them doing it themselves.

    Any tips on this phase of this endless process?

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited August 14
    So anyone have any experience with glass block windows? Specifically I have block windows in my basement, with a center vent. One of them is an old busted aluminum vent that the glass had been completely broken through on. I'd like to replace this with a new vinyl hopper vent. My best guess on how to accomplish this is to get a long 1/4" masonry drill bit and drill as many holes through the mortar around the aluminum frame as I can, then use a masonry chisel to try and chip the thing out carefully avoiding the glass blocks. Then just try to cleanup the mortar as good as I can and mixup a new batch of mortar to put in the new vent. At first I thought about using a carbide masonry blade on my oscillating tool, but I don't think it would get deep enough even going from both sides, as I think these are a good 4" thick.

    Simpsonia on
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    So this process involves enough paperwork that I feel like I have a second job, but we’re moving forward! House inspection on Monday revealed some issues, but nothing catastrophic.

    Which leads to a question - what sort of repairs are reasonable to ask for, and is there any advice on how to handle the negotiations here? Do we go in asking for a larger set of repairs than we expect so we have some room to negotiate, or is taking a more genuine approach recommended (my instinct, but my wife’s a better negotiator).

    The big things we’re looking at are replacing a small but inconvenient section of old rotting pressboard siding with hardiplank, some questionable support posts under the back and front porch, closing up a hole under the eaves of the roof where it looks like rodents had a field day, and correcting whatever is going on with the cloth tied around an otherwise uncovered copper pipe in the basement.

    Nothing extreme, but some of these are definitely big jobs, and given that the previous owners seemed happy to paint over wood rotten enough to stick a finger into, we really don’t want them doing it themselves.

    Any tips on this phase of this endless process?

    Since you don't trust them to do the repairs, you're going to want to ask for the sale price to be lowered by the cost of the repairs (since you're now going to be eating the costs.) Have a contractor look over the items and give an estimate on the repair costs.

    Be aware, however, that they don't have to agree to this, and can refuse - at which point you have to decide if you're willing to take it as is, or walk away.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    OneAngryPossumElvenshaeJebus314
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    I've always been advised to ask for the things that are a safety concern to be fixed, and fix the cosmetic stuff yourself.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    ElvenshaeShadowfire
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    I've always been advised to ask for the things that are a safety concern to be fixed, and fix the cosmetic stuff yourself.

    Yeah, this is the angle I’m personally leaning towards. The support posts are the only issue that seems potentially catastrophic to me, but I’m also not so familiar with home owning that I really know the dangers of decaying siding or having an unprotected entrance for critters to get into the attic.

    Thanks everybody! The journey continues.

  • OptyOpty Registered User regular
    Opty wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »

    Apparently this isn't super uncommon and it's speculated that there's a requirement for height over sceptic tank, so that's the easiest way to reach it.

    It's like when a 5 bedroom house advertises itself as a 3 bedroom because the septic tank is only rated for a 3 bedroom house.

    Wait, are septic tanks rated based on a poop per person metric?

    It's a worst case scenario type thing, where you must--by law, which may be different where you are--assume that every bedroom in your house has someone living in it and using the septic tank for a prescribed amount. Our realtor's rule-of-thumb estimation was 1 bedroom requires 500 gallons and then every additional bedroom adds 250 gallons on top of that. As I noted, your local laws may differ, in that they may not force the estimation at all, they may require different capacities per bedroom, or they may also include square footage limits on top of the bedrooms.

    LaOs
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I need 750 gallons to myself

  • GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    Home today because we woke up to a giant flood of water in front of our house - turns out the landscapers put in a pipe with improper glue, which separated today and gave a nice little fountain.

    Thankfully looks like it didn't get into the house itself at all (one advantage of San Diego, the ground is so dry right now that it can absorb a lot of water)

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    I've always been advised to ask for the things that are a safety concern to be fixed, and fix the cosmetic stuff yourself.

    Yeah, this is the angle I’m personally leaning towards. The support posts are the only issue that seems potentially catastrophic to me, but I’m also not so familiar with home owning that I really know the dangers of decaying siding or having an unprotected entrance for critters to get into the attic.

    Thanks everybody! The journey continues.

    I would ask for anything that wasn't obvious before you made your offer. Presumably things like a deck that needs to be refinished are things you should have taken into account when making your offer, but something like a rotting support post may not have been clear until after the inspection. So even if it isn't particularly hazardous I would still ask for the repair.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
    DoodmannElvenshae
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    @OneAngryPossum double check your inspection report, too. Building inspectors will typically rank them as critical/recommended/cosmetic fixes (or will do so verbally during the inspection)

    AbsoluteZero
  • MortiousMortious The Nightmare Begins Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Mortious wrote: »
    Mortious wrote: »
    Getting out of a nice warn bath onto a nice soft carpet seems like it would be really nice for the first time you use it.

    My grandparents had a carpeted bathroom. I could never figure out the logic there.

    There has to be a way to get it to work though.

    The idea of stepping out of a shower and then rolling around on the floor to dry yourself is appealing.

    No cold tiles, less slipperly etc.

    Maybe something like fitted sheets, but for carpets so they can be replaced and washed?

    No sure if trolling.

    Bath mats are a thing; or do you ice skate around the bathroom getting out of your shower?

    Bathmats cover a tiny portion of the bathroom. I still need to step onto tiles at some point. And they significantly harder to clean, or at least ours is, because of the rubber backing.

    Move to New Zealand
    It’s not a very important country most of the time
    http://steamcommunity.com/id/mortious
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    That's why you use multiple! Also we have a low-pile towel we lay down over the bathmat in the bathroom. I know that pretty much negates the bathmat (other than sound dampening), but at least this way you can wash it.

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    Mortious wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Mortious wrote: »
    Mortious wrote: »
    Getting out of a nice warn bath onto a nice soft carpet seems like it would be really nice for the first time you use it.

    My grandparents had a carpeted bathroom. I could never figure out the logic there.

    There has to be a way to get it to work though.

    The idea of stepping out of a shower and then rolling around on the floor to dry yourself is appealing.

    No cold tiles, less slipperly etc.

    Maybe something like fitted sheets, but for carpets so they can be replaced and washed?

    No sure if trolling.

    Bath mats are a thing; or do you ice skate around the bathroom getting out of your shower?

    Bathmats cover a tiny portion of the bathroom. I still need to step onto tiles at some point. And they significantly harder to clean, or at least ours is, because of the rubber backing.

    You can buy bathmats without the rubber backing, and then wash them with all your other linens.

    webguy20KetarN1tSt4lkerMaguano
  • SeñorAmorSeñorAmor !!! Registered User regular
    edited August 14
    So I'm running into (what I perceive as) a small issue with a local electrician and an amendment to offer to purchase on a house my mom just bought.

    Long story short, my mom bought a new (older) house and the electrical did not appear to be grounded. No GFCIs in the bathroom or kitchen and the outlets in the house are all two prong, without the 3rd prong for the ground.

    I did not see any of this prior to her buying the house, but I did find out the age and made her tell her realtor to include a clause that the electrical needed to be grounded and up to code. The amendment specifically states:
    Seller, at seller's expense, agrees to complete the following items at least five (5) days prior to closing:

    2) Licensed electrician to evaluate & repair the following safety hazards:
    1. GFCI outlet by kitchen sink (missing or not working)
    2. GFCI outlet by bathroom sink (missing or not working)
    3. Open or missing ground in living room, NW bedroom & NE bedroom outlets

    The two GFCIs were added and shows as properly grounded according to my tester, so 1 and 2 are complete, as far as I can tell. The issue lies with #3, as I'm not entirely sure what it means to "evaluate & repair" it. To me, it means updating the electrical so it's properly grounded, but I'm not an electrician. None of the two prong outlets were changed, however, so I pulled a few of them out and they don't look grounded to me.

    I have a contact at the electrician's company and have worked with him at several job sites. We're on a first name basis, so I shot him an email asking about it. He said he couldn't remember (he didn't do the actual work) and asked for a copy of the amendment. I sent it over to him with some pics:
    84p4b9urqum7.jpg
    yypdxytkducy.jpg
    nxaekkewitva.jpg
    qm2wfn5gpqni.jpg
    qevuha4ryboc.jpg
    5wzzogvpnq25.jpg

    and said nothing looked grounded to me.

    His response was
    The outlets in the picture are non-grounding outlets. That is indicated the type of receptacle and the wiring.
    There were probably 3 wire grounded receptacles installed incorrectly.

    These can either be fixed by replacing with a GFCI receptacle. You may need more than one depending upon the circuitry.
    Or
    You can install new wiring to the outlets and install the grounded duplex receptacles.

    Some home owners have opted to just install 1 or 2 new receptacles and do nothing with the existing wiring.


    Now I'm no electrician, but it seems to me that they didn't complete #3 on that list.

    Is there something I'm missing?

    SeñorAmor on
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    SeñorAmor wrote: »
    So I'm running into (what I perceive as) a small issue with a local electrician and an amendment to offer to purchase on a house my mom just bought.

    Long story short, my mom bought a new (older) house and the electrical did not appear to be grounded. No GFCIs in the bathroom or kitchen and the outlets in the house are all two prong, without the 3rd prong for the ground.

    I did not see any of this prior to her buying the house, but I did find out the age and made her tell her realtor to include a clause that the electrical needed to be grounded and up to code. The amendment specifically states:
    Seller, at seller's expense, agrees to complete the following items at least five (5) days prior to closing:

    2) Licensed electrician to evaluate & repair the following safety hazards:
    1. GFCI outlet by kitchen sink (missing or not working)
    2. GFCI outlet by bathroom sink (missing or not working)
    3. Open or missing ground in living room, NW bedroom & NE bedroom outlets

    The two GFCIs were added and shows as properly grounded according to my tester, so 1 and 2 are complete, as far as I can tell. The issue lies with #3, as I'm not entirely sure what it means to "evaluate & repair" it. To me, it means updating the electrical so it's properly grounded, but I'm not an electrician. None of the two prong outlets were changed, however, so I pulled a few of them out and they don't look grounded to me.

    I have a contact at the electrician's company and have worked with him at several job sites. We're on a first name basis, so I shot him an email asking about it. He said he couldn't remember (he didn't do the actual work) and asked for a copy of the amendment. I sent it over to him with some pics:
    84p4b9urqum7.jpg
    yypdxytkducy.jpg
    nxaekkewitva.jpg
    qm2wfn5gpqni.jpg
    qevuha4ryboc.jpg
    5wzzogvpnq25.jpg

    and said nothing looked grounded to me.

    His response was
    The outlets in the picture are non-grounding outlets. That is indicated the type of receptacle and the wiring.
    There were probably 3 wire grounded receptacles installed incorrectly.

    These can either be fixed by replacing with a GFCI receptacle. You may need more than one depending upon the circuitry.
    Or
    You can install new wiring to the outlets and install the grounded duplex receptacles.

    Some home owners have opted to just install 1 or 2 new receptacles and do nothing with the existing wiring.


    Now I'm no electrician, but it seems to me that they didn't complete #3 on that list.

    Is there something I'm missing?

    Seems like a reasonable request. I'm not sure if it's worth complaining about though. The quick-n-cheap fix would be to stick a GFCI on each circuit, and slap a "no equipment ground" label on all relevant outlets, so if you got them to fix the issue, that would be what they would do. But you could do that yourself for less than $100.

  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    So the house we bough has old-ass power garage door openers, but only one remote for each of them. It seems more difficult to figure out than I would have expected to determine if I can buy additional remotes that will work.

    :so_raven:
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Jesus Tap-dancing Christ those outlets.

    Tell them they didn't do #3 and see what the response is. The pic of the panel shows some new wires, which makes me question why they didn't do everything at the time.

    That looks like stucco walls so doing a full rewire would be Not Fun. Still, I would make an effort to replace all the cloth jacketed wiring on the left side of the panel.

    AbsoluteZero
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Corvus wrote: »
    So the house we bough has old-ass power garage door openers, but only one remote for each of them. It seems more difficult to figure out than I would have expected to determine if I can buy additional remotes that will work.

    I have a Craftsman opener from the maybe 90s and this worked:
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Chamberlain-Universal-Clicker-Black-Garage-Door-Remote-Control-KLIK3U-BK2/301305842

    "Never believe management about anything anywhere." -Aistan
    AbsoluteZero
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    Corvus wrote: »
    So the house we bough has old-ass power garage door openers, but only one remote for each of them. It seems more difficult to figure out than I would have expected to determine if I can buy additional remotes that will work.

    I have a Craftsman opener from the maybe 90s and this worked:
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Chamberlain-Universal-Clicker-Black-Garage-Door-Remote-Control-KLIK3U-BK2/301305842

    Thanks I'll check it out.

    :so_raven:
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    How do you fine homeowners feel about ProPress joints for copper plumbing? I had some plumbing work done recently and I just assumed all the joints would be soldered, but when I took a closer look the next day I realized the plumber had actually used ProPress fittings for all the joints. Now I'm wondering if I've unwittingly rolled the dice and have a leak in my future.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    How do you fine homeowners feel about ProPress joints for copper plumbing? I had some plumbing work done recently and I just assumed all the joints would be soldered, but when I took a closer look the next day I realized the plumber had actually used ProPress fittings for all the joints. Now I'm wondering if I've unwittingly rolled the dice and have a leak in my future.

    For Harry Homeowner stuff, the convenience fittings are fine. If I pay a pro I want that shit soldered, though.

    Bullhead
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular

    Something dark and twisted in my heart says the toilet paper MUST be kept on the wire shelf, so that anyone using it _really_ has to lean to get clean.

  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    a5ehren wrote: »
    How do you fine homeowners feel about ProPress joints for copper plumbing? I had some plumbing work done recently and I just assumed all the joints would be soldered, but when I took a closer look the next day I realized the plumber had actually used ProPress fittings for all the joints. Now I'm wondering if I've unwittingly rolled the dice and have a leak in my future.

    For Harry Homeowner stuff, the convenience fittings are fine. If I pay a pro I want that shit soldered, though.

    I don't know that it's necessarily a "Harry Homeowner" type fitting. It looks like the tools you need to install the things run into the thousands of dollars and the system is marketed towards professionals. Was just wondering if anyone in this thread had any experience with this type of fitting and if they had any problems?

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    The Philly suburbs sex dungeon house is off the market, as it turns out that kinkster home rental is much more lucrative.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    Captain InertiaCalica
  • BloodycowBloodycow Registered User regular
    edited August 16
    So update on my 8 month roofing adventure. Got a quote for a new roof, with a pitch built over my flat part of the roof, plus an additional valley system built around my chimney.

    Which my first contractor didn't say anything about, the new one asked if I've ever had water damage around the chimney, which I have, I have had to replace drywall at the front of the chimney. So he says with this new peak and valley around it, i will never have water issues again.

    He has been in business since 93 and has not a single bad review that my google fu has produced.

    He also asked me who the contractor was that I hired, I told him, and he kinda laughed and said he knows the guy. He has apparently done a few jobs with supply's from the same supplier. That supplier never received money for said jobs. He is now cut off.

    I called said shitty contractor and told him I'm going with someone else and to bring me a certified/cashiers check for my down payment. He called me back... three days later to tell me he has to return the materials then get a check from the supplier, then pay me sometime next week (I honestly think I'm out 4 grand.)


    Oh and new contractors brother does custom vinyl windows, so I may be spending another few grand to get 12 old double pane windows updated. As half my house has new windows and the other half has windows from when it was built in '68 and they are all pretty rotten and non functioning.

    I want to go back 7 years and punch my past self. Just keep renting!

    Bloodycow on
    " I am a warrior, so that my son may be a merchant, so that his son may be a poet.”
    ― John Quincy Adams
    DoodmannAbsoluteZero
  • urahonkyurahonky Dayton, OHRegistered User regular
    Had someone out a few minutes ago to check out the garage door. Wife and I settled on the high-end door with mid-level insulation, tracks, and old door removed for about $1100 including installation/taxes. A little more than I was hoping for but that's what you get when you get the upper tier door (it looks really nice). I can't wait to finally have a decent door.

    Doodmann
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    @Bloodycow call it a learning experience? But also start working on small claims court because I agree that otherwise you won't see the money.

    LaOsBullheadwebguy20
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    ugh, no private tours this week and while we're doing another open house tomorrow, our agent is already talking about a price drop. I think she's being too aggressive but on the other hand I would have thought we'd get a low ball offer or something at this point.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Torchlight | Steam | ART
  • chromdomchromdom Why do bad things keep happening to me? Oh yeah, because of the things I've done.Registered User regular
    How long has it been on the market? It's from last year, so some of the data may be out of date, but I think this article probably has some sound info.

    Mr. Rogers wrote:
    You've made this day a special day, by just your being you. There's no person in the whole world like you; and I like you just the way you are.
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    a5ehren wrote: »
    How do you fine homeowners feel about ProPress joints for copper plumbing? I had some plumbing work done recently and I just assumed all the joints would be soldered, but when I took a closer look the next day I realized the plumber had actually used ProPress fittings for all the joints. Now I'm wondering if I've unwittingly rolled the dice and have a leak in my future.

    For Harry Homeowner stuff, the convenience fittings are fine. If I pay a pro I want that shit soldered, though.

    I don't know that it's necessarily a "Harry Homeowner" type fitting. It looks like the tools you need to install the things run into the thousands of dollars and the system is marketed towards professionals. Was just wondering if anyone in this thread had any experience with this type of fitting and if they had any problems?

    Never heard of propress but I'm guessing it's a similar seal to the sharkbite type stuff. I will say this, my dad is a building contractor and almost every plumber he has worked with does PEX now over copper. Except for brand new installations. Even then sometimes.

    The truth is a bad installation can happen with any material, and a good installation should last 20+ years for both copper and PEX stuff. Copper may last even longer still (I mean there are like 100+ year old houses with copper plumbing that still works), but copper can also fail if corrosion isn't managed. It's probably not work fretting over one vs the other.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
    AbsoluteZero
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    chromdom wrote: »
    How long has it been on the market? It's from last year, so some of the data may be out of date, but I think this article probably has some sound info.

    Only like a week, but this is the South Bay and like I said we haven't got any requests for a tour or low ball offers.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Torchlight | Steam | ART
  • SyngyneSyngyne Registered User regular
    Things I did not consider before buying this house:

    I will need a ladder to do some basic repairs.
    I drive an Altima.

    5gsowHm.png
    OneAngryPossum
  • BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    Syngyne wrote: »
    Things I did not consider before buying this house:

    I will need a ladder to do some basic repairs.
    I drive an Altima.

    Ladders are a costly but necessary tool. Multi-fold ladders are costly, but VERY uesful in a variety of situations and can usually fit comfortably in a sedan.

    Amazon.ca example

    I shall be telling this with a sigh
    Somewhere ages and ages hence:
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.
    Elvenshae
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