Homeowner/House Thread: It's going to cost how much, now?

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  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Is it on the walls or ceiling in the basement? You could staple on sheet plastic maybe, or screw in some thin drywall and don't mud it.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Is it on the walls or ceiling in the basement? You could staple on sheet plastic maybe, or screw in some thin drywall and don't mud it.
    Ceiling. It's not on the walls.

  • vamenvamen Registered User regular
    edited April 6
    I've owned my home for 12 years and I finally needed my insurance due to some water damage (pin hole leak under my stairs) and it took them 1.5 months to finally tell me they aren't going to help me. Very excited about that news. And the delay. The real slap in the face is that my annual auto-payment to them cleared about a week after they shot me down. Very hard to not feel like I'm not being straight up robbed by them at this point =p.

    Anyhoo, an unrelated issue I have discovered while someone was out inspecting the water damage is that my front porch (concrete) has a some seepage going on and water has leaked in over the years and rotted a lot of the joist in that area. I figure my first order of business should be to get that repaired to stop any more water damage and then have the joist issue dealt with.

    Anyone know what sort of service handles that sort of thing? Seems like it falls in an odd space between specific disciplines so I'm not quite sure who to reach out to.

    vamen on
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    Alright, applications are in, now I just have to wait for their responses. I am fully prepared for colossal rejection, but on the upside I'll be able to find out which direction I should be heading and how long I'll need to go to get there.

    I would have sat down to do this much sooner, but I work at a hospital and we have a scheduled set of massive equipment upgrades that would have been hectic enough without Covid.

    gRAhjXV.gif
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    vamen wrote: »
    I've owned my home for 12 years and I finally needed my insurance due to some water damage (pin hole leak under my stairs) and it took them 1.5 months to finally tell me they aren't going to help me. Very excited about that news. And the delay. The real slap in the face is that my annual auto-payment to them cleared about a week after they shot me down. Very hard to not feel like I'm not being straight up robbed by them at this point =p.

    Anyhoo, an unrelated issue I have discovered while someone was out inspecting the water damage is that my front porch (concrete) has a some seepage going on and water has leaked in over the years and rotted a lot of the joist in that area. I figure my first order of business should be to get that repaired to stop any more water damage and then have the joist issue dealt with.

    Anyone know what sort of service handles that sort of thing? Seems like it falls in an odd space between specific disciplines so I'm not quite sure who to reach out to.

    Usually best to start with a general contractor (sometimes called building contractor). If they can’t do it themselves they’ll have subcontractors who will be able too.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
    vamenDoodmannN1tSt4lker
  • vamenvamen Registered User regular
    Thanks for the advice Jebus, I'll look into that!

  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    We woke up last Friday to our water heater deciding it no longer wanted to be a water heater and instead wanted to be some sort of very dramatic indoor fountain.

    Thankfully my partner noticed the lack of hot water and went into the utility room to check. Also thankful that there's a drain right in front of the heater so instead of having an indoor pool we only had about half an inch of water that was relatively easy to clean up.

    Got the new heater installed on Monday so I'm hoping that's the extent of our exciting home news for a while.

    ElvenshaeThegreatcowvamenN1tSt4lkerjkylefultonJebus314JragghenJanson
  • vamenvamen Registered User regular
    I'm learning that even a little water damage is a nightmare, I'm so glad for you that you caught it like you did.

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  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Ran electrical conduit for a 7.2 surround sound system yesterday and drilled so many holes through the ceiling joists etc. Lots of time looking up code but everything worked out well.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    I may have discovered a leak from an upstairs bathroom as water was on the kitchen floor beneath after I finished showering. I'll be verifying it by taping some paper towels to the ceiling before my next shower but would like to mentally prepare myself for how boned my wallet may be if anyone has had a similar experience.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • HedgethornHedgethorn Associate Professor of Historical Hobby Horses In the Lions' DenRegistered User regular
    edited April 11
    The contractors updating our bathroom tore up the concrete to move the toilet over a few feet. They found the old cast iron drain pipe had been leaking for who knows how long and had left behind a 3-1/2' deep cavity under the slab!

    Hedgethorn on
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  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    edited April 11
    I may have discovered a leak from an upstairs bathroom as water was on the kitchen floor beneath after I finished showering. I'll be verifying it by taping some paper towels to the ceiling before my next shower but would like to mentally prepare myself for how boned my wallet may be if anyone has had a similar experience.

    Depends on where the leak is and how long it’s been leaking.

    Best case scenario is a pipe leak, in the floor/ceiling, that is new. Maybe $500-$1000 or so.

    Worst case is a leak in the shower pan that is old. Maybe $4,000- 6,000. Or more depending on how nice your shower is and how nice you want your new shower.

    Jebus314 on
    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    At the least, check around your shower area for caulking or grout that looks suspect or has pulled away from one side. That's a good way to start narrowing things down.

    You can also run the shower while you poke around the walls with a flashlight.

    In our first house, we had to shower inside a plastic sheet cocoon for about 1-2 months before we could get a Bath Fitter type company to come in and install a new liner for the tub and walls.

    Related: I have to get off my ass and figure out what's up with my kids' run spigot because about 2" of the pipe is protruding into the tub area (i.e. the spigot is about 2" off the wall).

    No major drips but it needs attention.

  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Yo, the speed at which we went from "let's look at pre-approval and browse listings" to "holy shit they accepted our offer" is terrifying. Inspection's on Tuesday and I still don't believe it.

    The worst part so far might have been the wait from signing their counter until they gave formal acceptance. Was only like 16 hours but it felt like fucking forever.

    JragghenMichaelLCElvenshaeThegreatcowSyngyneGnizmo
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?
    Maryland does not, but school districting is more than just where our future currently non existent children will go to school.

    Houses in good school zones are worth more appreciate faster and weather recessions better than schools in worst school zones. To the point where new townhomes literally across the street from each other have a 100k difference in price.

  • GorkGork Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?
    Maryland does not, but school districting is more than just where our future currently non existent children will go to school.

    Houses in good school zones are worth more appreciate faster and weather recessions better than schools in worst school zones. To the point where new townhomes literally across the street from each other have a 100k difference in price.

    Oh man, we bought our townhouse in Montgomery county in one of the good school districts last May. It was not fun, but I grew up here, so I knew what to expect. My wife, who is from Ohio, on the other hand, had no idea what she was in for, no matter what I told her.

    She went from a firm budget that seemed enormous, to her, to my suggested numbers real quick after we started seeing stuff.

    ElvenshaeCauldSteel AngelzepherinMichaelLC
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    South Texas => Northern Virginia is a helluva sticker shock, too.

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  • ZavianZavian Senātus Populusque Rōmānus Registered User regular
    I finally installed my bidet! While trying to remove the water supply line I accidentally broke the plastic connector piece, and also inadvertently messed up the flush valve inside the tank by rotating it. This ended up causing the toilet to keep running constantly. I was actually concerned I might need a plumber! After buying a new supply line cable and installing it, then rotating the flush valve around and resetting the floater, the toilet now flushed and refills like normal again, and the bidet works fine. I am the plumbing champion woooo!

    ElvenshaeJebus314chromdomCauldCarpyStabbity Stylechrishallett83ThegreatcowMugsleyBlackDragon480webguy20MichaelLCAbsoluteZeroSyngyneGnizmo
  • ThegreatcowThegreatcow Lord of All Bacons Washington State - It's Wet up here innit? Registered User regular
    Holy crudnuggets. I have an ever deepening respect for plumbers now than I ever have before. With the corona thing going on right now I haven't been able to find any plumbers willing to visit a home to do work, so I finally decided to bite the bullet this weekend and attempt to swap my dishwasher out with the unit my friend gave me from his old kitchen as a housewarming present. I watched a few videos online and it seemed straightforward enough (route waste and water hoses appropriately and wire a standard positive/negative/ground terminal wire from the wall to the Dishwasher).

    And sure, in a perfect world, it'd go easy peasy as it did in the video. But good lord, whatever foul magic possessed the previous resident to do this hookup and setup was something indeed. First, the old dishwasher didn't even make use of its normal feet to slide and position the dishwasher unit. The previous owner installed some giant screw bolts and used them as makeshift "jacks" to lift and adjust the height of the machine. This required the removal of 6 different nuts to actually unscrew them and start trying to move the unit out. Then I discovered some bizarre hose and water line configuration that necessitated a trip to home depot as due to the position of the unit and pipes, I ended up having to buy an 8 foot water line and drain hose just to get it in range of the hookups.

    Took about 6 and a half hours all said including the home depot trip to get everything but I managed to get it done! And holy hell for a unit that was in storage for over a year and a half it runs so nice. The old frigidaire that I removed wailed like a damn banshee when I ran it, despite the overall good cleaning job it did. This Samsung is so much quieter it's glorious. Feel pretty proud of myself for getting it done and I hope it lasts a while too.

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Gork wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?
    Maryland does not, but school districting is more than just where our future currently non existent children will go to school.

    Houses in good school zones are worth more appreciate faster and weather recessions better than schools in worst school zones. To the point where new townhomes literally across the street from each other have a 100k difference in price.

    Oh man, we bought our townhouse in Montgomery county in one of the good school districts last May. It was not fun, but I grew up here, so I knew what to expect. My wife, who is from Ohio, on the other hand, had no idea what she was in for, no matter what I told her.

    She went from a firm budget that seemed enormous, to her, to my suggested numbers real quick after we started seeing stuff.

    That the townhouse I inherited is in walking distance from one of the best non-magnet high schools in MoCo is a big part of why I refuse to sell it and buy a more manageable space for a lone bachelor.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Any tips for removing hard water scale from the seals on a dishwasher? Baking soda + vinegar? I'm worried about damaging the rubber in the seals.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Gork wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?
    Maryland does not, but school districting is more than just where our future currently non existent children will go to school.

    Houses in good school zones are worth more appreciate faster and weather recessions better than schools in worst school zones. To the point where new townhomes literally across the street from each other have a 100k difference in price.

    Oh man, we bought our townhouse in Montgomery county in one of the good school districts last May. It was not fun, but I grew up here, so I knew what to expect. My wife, who is from Ohio, on the other hand, had no idea what she was in for, no matter what I told her.

    She went from a firm budget that seemed enormous, to her, to my suggested numbers real quick after we started seeing stuff.
    MoCo definitely swings hard. Silver spring especially, it is half 600k houses and 400k houses, and it's spread right at the district line.

  • GorkGork Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    Gork wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?
    Maryland does not, but school districting is more than just where our future currently non existent children will go to school.

    Houses in good school zones are worth more appreciate faster and weather recessions better than schools in worst school zones. To the point where new townhomes literally across the street from each other have a 100k difference in price.

    Oh man, we bought our townhouse in Montgomery county in one of the good school districts last May. It was not fun, but I grew up here, so I knew what to expect. My wife, who is from Ohio, on the other hand, had no idea what she was in for, no matter what I told her.

    She went from a firm budget that seemed enormous, to her, to my suggested numbers real quick after we started seeing stuff.
    MoCo definitely swings hard. Silver spring especially, it is half 600k houses and 400k houses, and it's spread right at the district line.

    If you don’t work in DC proper or don’t mind hour plus commutes, the area in Wootton High School’s district is sort of better. We work in the city, so it was a bit much for us.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Gork wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Gork wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Looking at houses and the good homes are on the market for a day. And the good houses that are cheap are in terrible school districts. I’ve spent so much time looking at elementary school zoning maps.

    Do you have School Choice in your state?
    Maryland does not, but school districting is more than just where our future currently non existent children will go to school.

    Houses in good school zones are worth more appreciate faster and weather recessions better than schools in worst school zones. To the point where new townhomes literally across the street from each other have a 100k difference in price.

    Oh man, we bought our townhouse in Montgomery county in one of the good school districts last May. It was not fun, but I grew up here, so I knew what to expect. My wife, who is from Ohio, on the other hand, had no idea what she was in for, no matter what I told her.

    She went from a firm budget that seemed enormous, to her, to my suggested numbers real quick after we started seeing stuff.
    MoCo definitely swings hard. Silver spring especially, it is half 600k houses and 400k houses, and it's spread right at the district line.

    If you don’t work in DC proper or don’t mind hour plus commutes, the area in Wootton High School’s district is sort of better. We work in the city, so it was a bit much for us.
    I wouldn't mind because my work is right next to a metro station, but it would be a 90 min to 2 hour commute for my wife, we did look in MoCo, but we are more focused in Anne Arundel County, which has schools that are some of the worst in the state, and schools that are some of the best in the state. Education inequity abounds.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    If you're changing batteries in your smoke detectors, that's probably a good time to change the batteries in your alarm sensors too. And when you're doing that, maybe replace the adhesive that attaches them to the walls.

    Why yes my heart is pounding at 2am!

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  • Stabbity StyleStabbity Style Warning: Mothership Reporting Kennewick, WARegistered User regular
    edited April 23
    Anyone have experience with decreasing the slope of a hill? I've got a pretty sharp cut off between two parts of my yard and I've been thinking about the best way to tackle it. The back 10 feet of my yard are an irrigation easement, so I don't believe I'm allowed to build anything on it, like a retaining wall, which was my first thought. I thought about maybe doing a retaining wall 10 feet in, but that basically puts it just barely in front of where the cut off is, so it doesn't really gain me much usable yard. Right now I'm thinking of getting some fill dirt in and just making it a more gradual slope so the yard's usable. Should I call a landscaping company to come do that? Can I just get some fill dirt, pack it down into the slope, and then put some topsoil on it?

    Also, do you guys have any recommendations for low maintenance (ideally no mowing if possible) ground cover for a desert area (hardiness zone 7a)? Ideally something people could walk on at least a bit. I think I've seen creeping thyme and moss as possible candidates, but I don't know if you guys have any opinions. Also, something that'd help a bit with controlling erosion would be good, too, since all of my yard is basically a hill. I'd rather not have gravel, too.

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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Retaining wall with a fence and level off the yard is the best solution, but you can do gradual slope with some dirt. Just make sure your locale doesn't require a permit for grading changes (looks like it might with the irrigation easement).

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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  • redfield85redfield85 Registered User regular
    Day 3598: Still can't get an inspection. Really want to move. Send halp.

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  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    redfield85 wrote: »
    Day 3598: Still can't get an inspection. Really want to move. Send halp.

    ...Like a home owners inspection? I was able to schedule one on Tuesday for tomorrow.

  • redfield85redfield85 Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    redfield85 wrote: »
    Day 3598: Still can't get an inspection. Really want to move. Send halp.

    ...Like a home owners inspection? I was able to schedule one on Tuesday for tomorrow.

    I'm in Philly. Still can't.

    There was something that happened recently where if you signed your contract for the house on or before March 18th, you can move ahead. We signed on March 19th, because of course. Our realtor was looking into seeing if we can move ahead, but no can do.

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  • Stabbity StyleStabbity Style Warning: Mothership Reporting Kennewick, WARegistered User regular
    edited April 23
    bowen wrote: »
    Retaining wall with a fence and level off the yard is the best solution, but you can do gradual slope with some dirt. Just make sure your locale doesn't require a permit for grading changes (looks like it might with the irrigation easement).

    Dang, I hadn't considered that they wouldn't want a grading change either. Man, this sucks. DAMN YOU EASEMENTS, LET ME USE MY YARD.

    Edit: Looked up the Irrigation District's permitting process for encroachments on easements and apparently retaining walls are actually commonly approved! Like $350 for a permit application, though. I'll probably hit up a landscaping company about it. Maybe talk to my neighbors, too, see if they wanna get in on a retaining wall, too, since they have the same issue in their yard. Probably not something I do in the near future, though, that sounds like a 5 figure project at least.

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  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Anyone done a rent back when buying a house and if you did how did you handle the utilities during that period?

  • GorkGork Registered User regular
    edited April 23
    Carpy wrote: »
    Anyone done a rent back when buying a house and if you did how did you handle the utilities during that period?

    We did and the seller paid the utilities during the rental period. It was written into the agreement. I believe they even had to pay the title company an amount put in escrow in case they exceeded a set amount. The water utility tried to charge us for the rental period and our realtor sent it right to the title company.

    Gork on
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  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Anyone done a rent back when buying a house and if you did how did you handle the utilities during that period?

    We did this when selling our condo, we were the ones renting back. Worked fine, they paid utilities I think, though it was only electricity so I don't entirely remember. I live somewhere we don't have metered water and the strata covered natural gas under the strata fees.

    :so_raven:
    Carpy
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Gork wrote: »
    Carpy wrote: »
    Anyone done a rent back when buying a house and if you did how did you handle the utilities during that period?

    We did and the seller paid the utilities during the rental period. It was written into the agreement. I believe they even had to pay the title company an amount put in escrow in case they exceeded a set amount. The water utility tried to charge us for the rental period and our realtor sent it right to the title company.

    Thanks. I went ahead and checked the rent back agreement and it's listed the same way in ours.

    Gork
  • GorkGork Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Gork wrote: »
    Carpy wrote: »
    Anyone done a rent back when buying a house and if you did how did you handle the utilities during that period?

    We did and the seller paid the utilities during the rental period. It was written into the agreement. I believe they even had to pay the title company an amount put in escrow in case they exceeded a set amount. The water utility tried to charge us for the rental period and our realtor sent it right to the title company.

    Thanks. I went ahead and checked the rent back agreement and it's listed the same way in ours.
    The best part was when our realtor called us two weeks after everything had been signed because they wanted to extend the rental period so they could have their kid’s birthday at the house. We were like, first, we already gave our notice to our apartment building and had to break our lease early based on what they proposed and, second, did they forget when their kid’s birthday was when they proposed the original date?!??

    I was mad at them from the negotiations so I had no problem saying no.

    zepherin
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Retaining wall with a fence and level off the yard is the best solution, but you can do gradual slope with some dirt. Just make sure your locale doesn't require a permit for grading changes (looks like it might with the irrigation easement).

    Dang, I hadn't considered that they wouldn't want a grading change either. Man, this sucks. DAMN YOU EASEMENTS, LET ME USE MY YARD.

    Edit: Looked up the Irrigation District's permitting process for encroachments on easements and apparently retaining walls are actually commonly approved! Like $350 for a permit application, though. I'll probably hit up a landscaping company about it. Maybe talk to my neighbors, too, see if they wanna get in on a retaining wall, too, since they have the same issue in their yard. Probably not something I do in the near future, though, that sounds like a 5 figure project at least.

    Oh yeah, usually in places that require lots of permits for lots of work they're generally stupid cheap and easy to get as long as you have someone licensed doing the work or you know how to draw up plans and file paperwork.

    It's the places in the middle of nowhere that have one dude working 3 departments for the whole county where it's a pain in the ass and like 4 grand to get a permit.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    As someone on a planning board that hears that sort of thing:
    Really the permitting is just to make sure people aren't doing something completely idiotic that will potentially mess with watersheds or screw over their neighbors (IE, I'm going to build drainage to dump into my neighbors property and it becomes their problem).

    zepherin
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