[Book] Thread Soon Will Be Making Another Run

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  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Rage of Dragons has an awesome African fantasy setting.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudAntoshka
  • MahnmutMahnmut Registered User regular
    So I've read all of the Dread Empire's Fall series that's out so far, and I like it and am eagerly awaiting the next book in the new trilogy.

    I'm still waiting for this shitty empire to fall though.

    Thanks -- I didn't know until now there was a sequel trilogy! Went on a huge WJW kick several years back.

    Steam/LoL: Jericho89
  • Lord_AsmodeusLord_Asmodeus goeticSobriquet: Here is your magical cryptic riddle-tumour: I AM A TIME MACHINERegistered User regular
    edited February 4
    It's just the one book right now, though there are a couple of standalone novellas that takes place in the time between the first trilogy and the second, the events of which are important to and referenced in the sequel trilogy, but they're not required reading to know what's going on, just helpful.

    Lord_Asmodeus on
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  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud my moons are good moons Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Rage of Dragons has an awesome African fantasy setting.
    Just finished. It was a very good book. Did not at all identify with the main character and found him to be a bit of an anti-hero but also really loved the setting and the mythos and the way the battles and training and culture were described. Definitely a formidable new author in Fantasy that I look forward to reading more work from.

    QuidAntoshkaGiantGeek2020
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    Of Men And Monsters was OK. Now reading volume 1 of John Julius Norwich's magisterial history of Byzantium, which is already superb 130 pages in.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Rage of Dragons has an awesome African fantasy setting.
    Just finished. It was a very good book. Did not at all identify with the main character and found him to be a bit of an anti-hero but also really loved the setting and the mythos and the way the battles and training and culture were described. Definitely a formidable new author in Fantasy that I look forward to reading more work from.

    The main character is not a good person. The one trait that stuck with him throughout the book was being self centered.

    That said, he's also justifiably angry at their society. It's a good balance I think.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudMoridin889
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Just read Starsight. I really liked it. Fairly light, relatively interesting. I didn't quite grasp the twist at the end. But holy hell did it end on an aggravating cliffhanger.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I forget, what was the twist?

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    A mix of crab dude wanting to summon a delver so he could have it to scare up support, and the idea that Cuna was actually supportive of contacting the humans. Also that maybe Delvers aren't an ultimate evil, just very misunderstood galactic sized intelligence.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    A mix of crab dude wanting to summon a delver so he could have it to scare up support, and the idea that Cuna was actually supportive of contacting the humans. Also that maybe Delvers aren't an ultimate evil, just very misunderstood galactic sized intelligence.

    the
    smile thing was really well done. i feel like the delvers are going to be machine intelligences that have outgrown our universe and that's another reason the machines are forbidden. they can eventually connect with the delvers.

  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    I've been rolling through the Expanse series after getting 3 and 4 for Christmas, but I've hit a serious wall.

    (Book 3)
    And that wall's name is Melba. Or Clarissa. Whatever, I don't even care. Her chapters are fucking painful, like some angry goth kid's livejournal entries. I started skipping them entirely but now she's actually interacting with characters that matter and I am forced to suffer.

    I hate this character so much, but not in a 'ooh great villain' way. What I want more than anything is for her to fuck off, and I have a feeling that instead of her fucking off I'm going to have to suffer through a stupid redemption arc because that always happens with characters I do not enjoy in the least.

    I think I'm in for a rough time with this one.

    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I liked Peaches.

    chrono_travellerSyphonBlueTofystedethwebguy20GiantGeek2020
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud my moons are good moons Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Somebody here recommended The Migration. I'm going to say it was Bogart.

    I'm only a few chapters in but it's excellent so far. It's like a lost John Wyndham novel

    It was me, and yes it feels exactly like the sort of thing Wyndham would have written if he'd maybe experimented with LSD a little more.

    I have a book of her short stories around here somewhere as well that I need to get around to.
    I just finished The Migration. I really wanted to like it and really enjoyed the first half but the second half fell completely flat for me.

  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo Like a bad lobster in a dark cellar Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Somebody here recommended The Migration. I'm going to say it was Bogart.

    I'm only a few chapters in but it's excellent so far. It's like a lost John Wyndham novel

    It was me, and yes it feels exactly like the sort of thing Wyndham would have written if he'd maybe experimented with LSD a little more.

    I have a book of her short stories around here somewhere as well that I need to get around to.
    I just finished The Migration. I really wanted to like it and really enjoyed the first half but the second half fell completely flat for me.

    I can understand this. The way it plays out is strange to say the least.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud my moons are good moons Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Somebody here recommended The Migration. I'm going to say it was Bogart.

    I'm only a few chapters in but it's excellent so far. It's like a lost John Wyndham novel

    It was me, and yes it feels exactly like the sort of thing Wyndham would have written if he'd maybe experimented with LSD a little more.

    I have a book of her short stories around here somewhere as well that I need to get around to.
    I just finished The Migration. I really wanted to like it and really enjoyed the first half but the second half fell completely flat for me.

    I can understand this. The way it plays out is strange to say the least.
    I actually enjoyed the strange parts! It was just the teen parts were too much. I would have enjoyed a full transition into
    bird people or body horror or war with bird people or bird people AND body horror or just contemplating the bird people and the transition of a species or mediating on what it means to give into the inevitability of nature but the last few chapters were about her smanging it with Brian and then bleeding everywhere and I was just like.... do you want this to be YA (thats okay, just commit fully please) or do you want this to be climate sci-fi (a new genre you might have just invented).

  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo Like a bad lobster in a dark cellar Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Somebody here recommended The Migration. I'm going to say it was Bogart.

    I'm only a few chapters in but it's excellent so far. It's like a lost John Wyndham novel

    It was me, and yes it feels exactly like the sort of thing Wyndham would have written if he'd maybe experimented with LSD a little more.

    I have a book of her short stories around here somewhere as well that I need to get around to.
    I just finished The Migration. I really wanted to like it and really enjoyed the first half but the second half fell completely flat for me.

    I can understand this. The way it plays out is strange to say the least.
    I actually enjoyed the strange parts! It was just the teen parts were too much. I would have enjoyed a full transition into
    bird people or body horror or war with bird people or bird people AND body horror or just contemplating the bird people and the transition of a species or mediating on what it means to give into the inevitability of nature but the last few chapters were about her smanging it with Brian and then bleeding everywhere and I was just like.... do you want this to be YA (thats okay, just commit fully please) or do you want this to be climate sci-fi (a new genre you might have just invented).
    Oh interesting. I don't think it ever felt like YA for me but I suspect the main character is very much based on the author's own childhood.
    I am 50% sure the author has not evolved into an angel after a plague related incident

    If you want climate apocalypse sci-fi The Windup Girl by somebody or other is the only other example I can think of.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    JG Ballard’s The Drowned World is an excellent environmental apocalypse novel.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud
  • jakobaggerjakobagger LO THY DREAD EMPIRE CHAOS IS RESTORED Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Somebody here recommended The Migration. I'm going to say it was Bogart.

    I'm only a few chapters in but it's excellent so far. It's like a lost John Wyndham novel

    It was me, and yes it feels exactly like the sort of thing Wyndham would have written if he'd maybe experimented with LSD a little more.

    I have a book of her short stories around here somewhere as well that I need to get around to.
    I just finished The Migration. I really wanted to like it and really enjoyed the first half but the second half fell completely flat for me.

    I can understand this. The way it plays out is strange to say the least.
    I actually enjoyed the strange parts! It was just the teen parts were too much. I would have enjoyed a full transition into
    bird people or body horror or war with bird people or bird people AND body horror or just contemplating the bird people and the transition of a species or mediating on what it means to give into the inevitability of nature but the last few chapters were about her smanging it with Brian and then bleeding everywhere and I was just like.... do you want this to be YA (thats okay, just commit fully please) or do you want this to be climate sci-fi (a new genre you might have just invented).
    Oh interesting. I don't think it ever felt like YA for me but I suspect the main character is very much based on the author's own childhood.
    I am 50% sure the author has not evolved into an angel after a plague related incident

    If you want climate apocalypse sci-fi The Windup Girl by somebody or other is the only other example I can think of.

    Paolo Bagcialupi, who also has another very climate-oriented novel called the Water Knife, although that one is maybe more cyberpunk. Or just a thriller in a near future with a fragmented US.

  • jakobaggerjakobagger LO THY DREAD EMPIRE CHAOS IS RESTORED Registered User regular
    From the 70s SF I used to read in the school library it seemed like the genre was maybe 75% environmentalism at least. Lots of dystopian tales written by worried hippies.

  • flamebroiledchickenflamebroiledchicken Registered User regular
    Speaking of environmental apocalypse, I finished Dead Astronauts by Vandermeer. I liked it! You definitely have to have an appreciation or at least a tolerance for postmodern wankery and poetic vagueness, but I found it completely mesmerizing and unique. My initial reaction was "Mark Z Danielewski meets the Strugatsky Bros" but not as obnoxious as that sounds, though I can definitely see people bouncing off of this. The story is told in an abstract and somewhat roundabout way, from a variety of shifting perspectives and changing realities, giving the whole thing a kaleidoscopic feeling. I may have wanted more of a climax towards the end, but overall it's not quite like anything I've read before.

    y59kydgzuja4.png
  • Lord_AsmodeusLord_Asmodeus goeticSobriquet: Here is your magical cryptic riddle-tumour: I AM A TIME MACHINERegistered User regular
    Glynn Stewart has started another new series and I like it. Another Sci Fi one so I guess Ong other things his sci-fi is just more popular than his fantasy stuff, frankly as much as I love his sci fi stuff I like his fantasy work a lot.

    Lord_Asmodeus.gifLord_Asmodeus2.gifz1i30sg.png
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo Like a bad lobster in a dark cellar Registered User regular
    The Raven Tower was unexpectedly good. I'd not realised it was by the same author as Ancillary Justice (I probably wouldn't have given it a chance if I'd had known given how it didn't work for me at all). I was probably hoping for a little more pay off but I've always liked the model of faith powered gods that sits at the centre of it.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    Feloniousmoz
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited February 17
    John Julius Norwich's first volume of Byzantium history was as magisterial as I'd expected. Next up is Hisham Matar's A Month In Siena, which the wife bought me for Valentine's Day. It's slim and seems to be a love letter to that city, which, considering it was the venue for one of the best meals I've ever eaten, seems fair enough.

    Bogart on
    Solar
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Finished Stanislaw Lem and I'm a bit done with Mr Lem now. Inventive and funny... In moderation

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    The Raven Tower was unexpectedly good. I'd not realised it was by the same author as Ancillary Justice (I probably wouldn't have given it a chance if I'd had known given how it didn't work for me at all). I was probably hoping for a little more pay off but I've always liked the model of faith powered gods that sits at the centre of it.

    Yeah, I had hoped for a little more punch in the ending, but at the same time, I felt like it also didn't over reach and end up mushy. Given the two options, I vastly prefer the direction it went.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud my moons are good moons Registered User regular
    I wanted to really like Cast Under An Alien Sun but it was not the Yankee In King Arthur's Court for the modern era that I had hoped. Seveneves levels of info-dumping and the thing is more alt-history than SciFi even though it is billed as such. The author is very Boomer in his writing and this supposed 24 year old Chemistry student loves Bruce Springsteen and thinks about his pregnant girlfriend maybe once the entire book even though he is stranded on an alien planet and will never see his family again. The whole thing was emotionally off and very dated. I enjoyed this as a novelty for half the book but the second half dragged very badly. I won't be reading the other 5 books after it. ):

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I don't think I'm going to stop getting angry when I see the title Seveneves.

    The constant info dump didn't bug me. The straight obsession with trying to get geography and physics details right with no regard for the sheer absurdity of his future civilization irks me to no end.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudAngelHedgie
  • knitdanknitdan Registered User regular
    Finished Gideon the Ninth

    Fucking hell.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    DevoutlyApatheticSummaryJudgmentKanaBrodynexuscrawlerTumin
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    Finished Gideon the Ninth

    Fucking hell.

    Harrow the Ninth comes out in June. The advance readers have been saying even nicer things about it than they did about Gideon.

    Brodynexuscrawler
  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    I am reading The Man in The High Castle and it’s very good. The characters are nuanced and feel like people and the sociology/culture view is great. The entry point of art collection is odd and works really well. I’ve not seen the tv show and have no idea how plotful the book is or where it’s going.

    I just finished Lies, Inc, also by Dick, which is a solid little sci-fi novel with a 100 page acid trip inserted into the middle of it, and then I read the afterword and it was like ah so the first version of this was the little sci-fi novel but PKD wanted to do more with it and later wrote a big expansion which starts here and ends here—and what do you know, they delineate exactly the start and end of the acid trip. But maybe without the acid trip it would be a bit pat, kind of a plot driven novella around a single central conceit. In any case it is hard to see that the same person wrote this and Man in the high castle and also the realist novel In Milton Lumky territory which I read a few months ago. Crazy versatility. I’m really glad I’ve embarked on a project to read all his books; they are really so good, which yes everyone knew already but I guess I didn’t know already!

    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    air-photos.tumblr.com
    Pailryder
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    I came across a couple of book reviews today on YT, something something algorithm something, and I realized that a more critical look into books. Does anyone have any suggestions for finding groups that are willing to do critical fantasy reviews, or youtube channels that do a good job of it?

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
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