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Kids/Parenting: It’s fine, everything is fine.

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Posts

  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited September 26
    spool32 wrote: »
    My hackles go up like whoa when people start throwing side eyes at stay-home parents, Working parents seem to feel the same way about our choices. We all need to recognize that people are doing their best and not tear down one choice to make ourselves feel better about the other.

    Just to be clear, nothing I said was intended to be side-eye thrown at stay-home parents. I don't think anyone else was, but I can't speak for them. More accurately, what I said was more "lots more people think they'd be capable of being stay-home parents than actually are, because it is an absolutely fucking mentally and physically demanding job especially to do primarily on your own." So I have nothing but respect for people who can make that work.

    We're all just trying to make it work, and we all recognize the daily injustices of being a parent. I really like the singularity analogy, because nothing can really prepare you for being on the other side. Doubly true of mothers, who are literally not the same person by the time they get to the other side.

    (And yeah, I think the support for both choices should be equal. Likewise as mentioned earlier about elder care, or the care of someone who has a disability. If a family member provides the support, they should not be treated as "free labor.")

    dennis on
    spool32CalicaSleep
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    Our 7 y.o. has had issues with this, even when she's not suffering from constipation (which she suffered from but we managed to find a maintenance routine with miralax that worked to keep things moving). And boy is it frustrating getting any helpful resolution from doctors, including gastroenterologists. If there's not something obvious, it's just one big shrug.

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  • kimekime Queen of Blades Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    Our 7 y.o. has had issues with this, even when she's not suffering from constipation (which she suffered from but we managed to find a maintenance routine with miralax that worked to keep things moving). And boy is it frustrating getting any helpful resolution from doctors, including gastroenterologists. If there's not something obvious, it's just one big shrug.

    That said, if you have the time and you're able financially, doesn't hurt to stop by the doctor's office and see what they say.

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  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited September 26
    kime wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    Our 7 y.o. has had issues with this, even when she's not suffering from constipation (which she suffered from but we managed to find a maintenance routine with miralax that worked to keep things moving). And boy is it frustrating getting any helpful resolution from doctors, including gastroenterologists. If there's not something obvious, it's just one big shrug.

    That said, if you have the time and you're able financially, doesn't hurt to stop by the doctor's office and see what they say.

    Oh, definitely. She's been back to the doctors several times, because we keep hoping they'll figure something else out (including "we can tell that it's no big deal and will just go away.")

    I was just trying to say that even if they can't figure it out, you aren't doomed.

    Plus, it's a really annoying spot as a parent because the reporter of symptoms is a known exaggerator in other cases. She didn't exaggerate the constipation, but boy does it seem weird that she sometimes doesn't complain about her stomach hurting until we ask her if it's hurting.

    dennis on
    kime
  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited September 26
    dennis wrote: »
    kime wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    Our 7 y.o. has had issues with this, even when she's not suffering from constipation (which she suffered from but we managed to find a maintenance routine with miralax that worked to keep things moving). And boy is it frustrating getting any helpful resolution from doctors, including gastroenterologists. If there's not something obvious, it's just one big shrug.

    That said, if you have the time and you're able financially, doesn't hurt to stop by the doctor's office and see what they say.

    Oh, definitely. She's been back to the doctors several times, because we keep hoping they'll figure something else out (including "we can tell that it's no big deal and will just go away.")

    I was just trying to say that even if they can't figure it out, you aren't doomed.

    Plus, it's a really annoying spot as a parent because the reporter of symptoms is a known exaggerator in other cases. She didn't exaggerate the constipation, but boy does it seem weird that she sometimes doesn't complain about her stomach hurting until we ask her if it's hurting.

    As a parent to a kid with gluten intolerance I would also recommend to try and check for biomarkers (in blood sample) if vague stomach symptoms persists for longer periods.

    We had our daughter in a medical study because it runs in the family on my wife's side. She was regularly checked for it and we are very glad to have caught it early.

    Movitz on
  • exisexis Registered User regular
    Our 9mo seems to be teething. First couple that popped out weren't too bad but she's been very grizzly for the last 30 hours or so. She pretty much just wants to cuddle mum, breastfeed, and sleep, anything else and she's crying.

    The thing is, she's recently developed a love for pointing, clapping and poking her tongue out. So when I clap for her she'll smile and clap back, but still be grizzling away with tears streaming down her face. Then she'll point at the dog.

    It is the saddest thing :cry:

  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Movitz wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    kime wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    Our 7 y.o. has had issues with this, even when she's not suffering from constipation (which she suffered from but we managed to find a maintenance routine with miralax that worked to keep things moving). And boy is it frustrating getting any helpful resolution from doctors, including gastroenterologists. If there's not something obvious, it's just one big shrug.

    That said, if you have the time and you're able financially, doesn't hurt to stop by the doctor's office and see what they say.

    Oh, definitely. She's been back to the doctors several times, because we keep hoping they'll figure something else out (including "we can tell that it's no big deal and will just go away.")

    I was just trying to say that even if they can't figure it out, you aren't doomed.

    Plus, it's a really annoying spot as a parent because the reporter of symptoms is a known exaggerator in other cases. She didn't exaggerate the constipation, but boy does it seem weird that she sometimes doesn't complain about her stomach hurting until we ask her if it's hurting.

    As a parent to a kid with gluten intolerance I would also recommend to try and check for biomarkers (in blood sample) if vague stomach symptoms persists for longer periods.

    We had our daughter in a medical study because it runs in the family on my wife's side. She was regularly checked for it and we are very glad to have caught it early.

    You're not talking about celiac, right? As far as I can tell, the current state of science has yet to find a non-Celiac biomarker for gluten issues:
    https://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-exactly-is-a-biomarker-and-why-is-it-so-essential/
    https://gluten.org/2021/12/27/what-you-need-to-know-about-gluten-sensitivity/
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6040034/

    Apparently, there's some preliminary promise of a difference that might eventually turn into a biomarker test, though:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6910677/

    My wife has a gluten intolerance (or possibly something that's often combined with typical flour). She went through a pretty extensive elimination process to track that down. But she tested negative for celiac. She also had almost the exact same symptoms as my daughter had when she was a child, but it wasn't handled at all well by her family.

    I have ulcerative colitis, so I'm pretty sure at some point they tested me for celiac.

    But we should get her tested for celiac. I had thought constipation was an unlikely symptom, but apparently that's wrong:
    https://www.verywellhealth.com/can-i-have-celiac-disease-and-constipation-562705

    And with parents with as messed up digestive systems as we have...

  • BSoBBSoB Registered User regular
    For my son it was simple lactose intolerance. Basically just some extra gas and intestinal pain. lactaid chews, and/or lactose free milk solved it.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Hell yeah ulcerative colitis bros!

    Kayne Red RobedennisCarpy
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited September 27
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    You can get inflammation of the glands in the abdominal area after an illness which will cause this.

    My niece had a bout with CMV recently which led to post-viral fatigue, and one issue which comes from that is swollen lymph nodes in the abdominal area, which presents sounding almost exactly like this. It's in the category of "sucks but nothing you can do, and will go away on it's own".

    electricitylikesme on
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    edited September 27
    urahonky wrote: »
    Hell yeah ulcerative colitis bros!

    UC, when you absolutely, positively, have to lose 30 pounds in the most painful 3 weeks you've ever experienced.

    I really hope that this doesn't pop up in any of my kids

    Carpy on
    urahonkydennis
  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited September 27
    dennis wrote: »
    Movitz wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    kime wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    My 4yo has been complaining about stomach aches. It's not a big complaint, just kinda passing mention "my stomach hurts". She's saying it almost once a day now. We initially wrote it off as hunger or poop, but she says she doesn't need to go to the toilet, and when we ask where she points the lower region near the belly button which seems off for hunger. She also doesn't show any other symptoms you'd associate with stomach aches: she's smiling, plays, runs and jumps around (even as she complains about hurting), eats well and poops well. You wouldn't know she's hurting if she didn't say anything.

    I'm not sure if she's feeling something normal and not expressing it correctly, or if there's a serious issue we should take her to the doctor for.

    Our 7 y.o. has had issues with this, even when she's not suffering from constipation (which she suffered from but we managed to find a maintenance routine with miralax that worked to keep things moving). And boy is it frustrating getting any helpful resolution from doctors, including gastroenterologists. If there's not something obvious, it's just one big shrug.

    That said, if you have the time and you're able financially, doesn't hurt to stop by the doctor's office and see what they say.

    Oh, definitely. She's been back to the doctors several times, because we keep hoping they'll figure something else out (including "we can tell that it's no big deal and will just go away.")

    I was just trying to say that even if they can't figure it out, you aren't doomed.

    Plus, it's a really annoying spot as a parent because the reporter of symptoms is a known exaggerator in other cases. She didn't exaggerate the constipation, but boy does it seem weird that she sometimes doesn't complain about her stomach hurting until we ask her if it's hurting.

    As a parent to a kid with gluten intolerance I would also recommend to try and check for biomarkers (in blood sample) if vague stomach symptoms persists for longer periods.

    We had our daughter in a medical study because it runs in the family on my wife's side. She was regularly checked for it and we are very glad to have caught it early.

    You're not talking about celiac, right? As far as I can tell, the current state of science has yet to find a non-Celiac biomarker for gluten issues:
    https://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-exactly-is-a-biomarker-and-why-is-it-so-essential/
    https://gluten.org/2021/12/27/what-you-need-to-know-about-gluten-sensitivity/
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6040034/

    Apparently, there's some preliminary promise of a difference that might eventually turn into a biomarker test, though:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6910677/

    My wife has a gluten intolerance (or possibly something that's often combined with typical flour). She went through a pretty extensive elimination process to track that down. But she tested negative for celiac. She also had almost the exact same symptoms as my daughter had when she was a child, but it wasn't handled at all well by her family.

    I have ulcerative colitis, so I'm pretty sure at some point they tested me for celiac.

    But we should get her tested for celiac. I had thought constipation was an unlikely symptom, but apparently that's wrong:
    https://www.verywellhealth.com/can-i-have-celiac-disease-and-constipation-562705

    And with parents with as messed up digestive systems as we have...

    Yes I meant celiac disease. The terms gluten intolerance and celiac disease are used synonymously here (as opposed to gluten allergy/sensitivity). But I tend to avoid calling it celiac disease as the term is less known and sometimes just gives a blank stare.

    I just meant the standard celiac biomarker test for antibodies for transglutaminase. Sorry for the confusion.

    Movitz on
    dennis
  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    Hell yeah ulcerative colitis bros!

    UC, when you absolutely, positively, have to lose 30 pounds in the most painful 3 weeks you've ever experienced.

    I really hope that this doesn't pop up in any of my kids

    Yeah, that's been a real worry of mine this whole time. Especially with my wife having gastro issues. Ironically, my son has never seemingly had any issues, and his ASD/sensory issues really limits his diet to something you might expect of a college freshman. My daughter, who has had the issues, loves munching on raw veggies and lettuce. So unless it's something like celiac, it doesn't seem to be diet.

    I've been "lucky" that my colitis has always been extremely mild and almost totally controlled by medicine. Never really had a flare-up. Which means I've gotten to avoid the pain (yay!), but never got the weight loss (err... yay. I guess. But not totally?)

  • wobblyheadedbobwobblyheadedbob Registered User regular
    tbloxham wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    For young babies it makes more economic sense to pay a parent to take a year off work than pay a daycare. Better for child development too.

    Depends on the parent. For some parents, being solely dedicated to an infant for an entire year is a form of torture, and the quality of care could suffer.

    Then that sounds an awful lot to me like somebody who shouldn't have kids?

    I suggest you stop there and just consider that not all parenting looks the same, and that it is incredibly hard on some people and saying "well, you shouldn't have had kids" is a bit of a goose thing to say.

    Then to try and rephrase excessive bluntness better because I'm not trying to be adversarial or critical, I don't see how it's at all an extreme notion that an infant requires an enormous amount of attention especially in that first year and that parents should be free of work to provide that attention. Neither do I consider it extreme that if parents are unwilling to devote that sort of attention to the kid because it's unpleasant then they should very very closely reexamine having a kid because they don't stop being a huge demand on your time for the next couple decades, minimum. Being unable to easily devote that time to the kid is obviously another matter and a painfully common one, particularly in the likes of the US where parental leave is, insanely, not federally mandated.

    And as I said, I wouldn't expect any parent to be glued to the kid 24/7/365. I wouldn't expect a parent to even spend an entire 24 hours caring for a kid unsupported or without relief. Even "just" 12 hours can be lot, and people have very real physical and mental limits regardless of their best intentions. I agree it's not healthy for the parent and would impact the care of the child, and a parent needs to able to do other stuff with their lives; I don't at all agree with the idea that having a kid means the kid is your entire life now and everything else comes to a dead stop, only that the kid(s) take top priority. It's clearly not some sort of iron-clad system of care which tolerates no deviation, there are different ways to handle the responsibility and stress for different kids and parents.

    I just found the phrase "a form of torture" associated with child-rearing to be very concerning and I don't see any reason why anyone should force that situation since there's a straightforward way to avoid it.

    Plenty of people think they'll enjoy parenting until they actually try it.

    This.

    Some people look forward to being a parent. Then once they've had the kid, they find that they've cycled into a deep depression, only partially caused by the lack of sleep. Mothers are especially prone to this, due to the intense biological changes and demands that come about growing a child, delivering it and breastfeeding. Some kids are much needier than other kids (e.g. colic). Plus since they are the only one who can produce breast milk - which for a whole host of reasons is considered by society (both for good reasons and a bit too much) as what you'd do for your child if you are a Good Mother - and thus typically bear more of the brunt of what kind be an incredibly taxing first year.

    And we haven't even touched on unintended pregnancies, pregnancies where one partner has a much greater desire for a child and the other partner feels threatened, relationships where the other partner is abusive, a child conceived where the other partner has left before the birth, etc.

    Saying "you should reexamine having a kid" after someone has had a damn kid - because people on the whole aren't going into it knowing these things - is as helpful and infuriating as the judgy advice from Dr. Phil.

    Also, the idea that in the past children were raised alone by perfect mothers singing gleefully in the kitchen is a ridiculous myth. Raising your own kids alone is a construct of American suburb formation in the 50s. Prior to that, most kids would be raised by a combination of their parents, older siblings, grandparents, local friends and relatives etc. This could be either formal, as in, many villages ran communal childcare for the kids where a few older girls or spry grandparents would keep an eye on them in groups during harvest time, or informal. Rich families would pay poor women to handle breast feeding, and all nighttime activities, or even ALL activities until the child was old enough for the parent to take a formal interest.

    Raising a human infant is a VERY difficult activity, the work of which is intended by biological design to be shared. For example, adult humans of reproductive age, and babies do not have the same sleep patterns. Not even close. If you try to sleep like a baby, you will eventually go mad. Conversely OLD people, over the age of like 65 have very similar sleep patterns to babies. With many sleeping lightly for a few hours, before waking up, and then returning to sleep after urinating or moving to a new sleep position.

    Anyone who says that there is anything, natural, genuine, or correct about a parent assuming all childcare responsibilities is just plain wrong. Some parents do it, and gain great joy from it, but most don't and there's nothing WRONG with that. Its those who CAN do it with a smileon their face who are the outliers.

    On top of that, infant is one stage and it'll end. I have no fondness for caring for infants, but I love toddlers. Should I "reconsider having kids"? Even if I found toddlers unpleasant (which I sometimes do!), that too shall pass. There's always a next stage and different people will have different preferences and abilities.

    kimeKayne Red RobeCaulddennislonelyahava
  • MaguanoMaguano Registered User regular
    edited October 1
    nothing says love like the first time you get a called to bring your son down to the police station for questioning about a firework related incident, and when the detective says we're going to read him his rights, you say "nope, we're going to reschedule" and walk out before they get to ask a question

    Also, the moment you realize you can no longer protect you kid, sucks.

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  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited October 3
    Wohoo! Our decision to replicate again is turning out successful so far. Expecting to have offspring #2 in January (this time a boy).

    Considering we were listed for adoption 4 years ago after 5 years of failed IVF treatment, having a family of 2 kids sure is something.

    3 year old daughter is ecstatic and getting priceless looks from kindergarten staff by explaining the whole process. "And the little brother has also been frozen, just like me!!"

    I expect to not sleep for the coming 5-10 years.

    Movitz on
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  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Ugh fuckin hell. Youngest had a light cough for what felt like 2 weeks. Then it finally went away for a day or two. Now she's got a stronger cough and a fever. It's just so frustrating because I know I'm going to get this thing in 3 or 4 days and it'll knock me out for 3 weeks and kill all of my run progress. And my wife can't take time off work because her job fucking sucks so I have to be the one to play caretaker while also working 8 hours.

    dennisAbsoluteZeroMovitz
  • kimekime Queen of Blades Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    Ugh fuckin hell. Youngest had a light cough for what felt like 2 weeks. Then it finally went away for a day or two. Now she's got a stronger cough and a fever. It's just so frustrating because I know I'm going to get this thing in 3 or 4 days and it'll knock me out for 3 weeks and kill all of my run progress. And my wife can't take time off work because her job fucking sucks so I have to be the one to play caretaker while also working 8 hours.

    Kiddo's had a cough for.... a month? Ish? A couple doctor visits and they still don't think it's anything serious, but come on child do you know how annoying and scary this is!?

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  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    Both my kids are like that, and so am I. Sniffles for a day, cough for six weeks. Need to get so damn many doctor's notes for the school.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    The youngest turns 4 in a few days and we've been debating on putting her in school a year early. She knows how to spell her name, the alphabet front and back, counts to 30 in English, counts to 10 in Korean, and knows how to spell all of her friends names.

    Our issue is not being able to sit still in a classroom.

  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    The youngest turns 4 in a few days and we've been debating on putting her in school a year early. She knows how to spell her name, the alphabet front and back, counts to 30 in English, counts to 10 in Korean, and knows how to spell all of her friends names.

    Our issue is not being able to sit still in a classroom.

    Hopefully you'll be finding a school where they don't expect 4/5 year olds to "sit still". It's just not a realistic thing for most of them to do at that age.

    CauldShadowfirekimeElvenshaeNobodyAbsoluteZero
  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    The youngest turns 4 in a few days and we've been debating on putting her in school a year early. She knows how to spell her name, the alphabet front and back, counts to 30 in English, counts to 10 in Korean, and knows how to spell all of her friends names.

    Our issue is not being able to sit still in a classroom.

    We started our oldest kid in half day school at 3 and our youngest at 2. At their ages they mostly just have a routine of various activities and games/choice time. I wouldn't say the curriculum is learning focused, though they do water plants in a garden watch a caterpillar turn into a butterfly and release it. etc.

    If you mean putting her in Kindergarten a year early, then I would try to know what the school day would be like. There should be some structure and time to socialize with other kids. As Dennis said, I don't think sitting in a desk and learning all day makes sense for that age, but being able to follow the activity would be good. Really, if you think she'll have fun then I'd put her in.

    Elvenshae
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Sorry I meant Kindergarten. She's not even in pre-school yet (that's next year) but I think she's already doing well enough to get through that.

    nx1fsp8sp5p1.png

    Although I just saw this so maybe the point is moot.

    dennis
  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    Sorry I meant Kindergarten. She's not even in pre-school yet (that's next year) but I think she's already doing well enough to get through that.

    nx1fsp8sp5p1.png

    Although I just saw this so maybe the point is moot.

    That kind of stinks. I'd guess that otherwise, lots of parents would be enrolling their 4 y.o. kids in the free K class instead of paid pre-K. I see free pre-K in Ohio is income-based, though one of your state senators is trying to make it universal.

  • Kayne Red RobeKayne Red Robe Master of Magic ArcanusRegistered User regular
    edited October 5
    urahonky wrote: »
    The youngest turns 4 in a few days and we've been debating on putting her in school a year early. She knows how to spell her name, the alphabet front and back, counts to 30 in English, counts to 10 in Korean, and knows how to spell all of her friends names.

    Our issue is not being able to sit still in a classroom.

    I went into Kindergarten at 4 and some change and I'd honestly advise against it (unless like all of her friends will end up a year ahead of her unless she goes in early and even then...). It absolutely sucks to be the smallest, youngest kid in your class for most of your school career.

    Edit: Maybe it would be less of a big deal for girls, I couldn't say.

    Kayne Red Robe on
  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    The youngest turns 4 in a few days and we've been debating on putting her in school a year early. She knows how to spell her name, the alphabet front and back, counts to 30 in English, counts to 10 in Korean, and knows how to spell all of her friends names.

    Our issue is not being able to sit still in a classroom.

    I went into Kindergarten at 4 and some change and I'd honestly advise against it (unless like all of her friends will end up a year ahead of her unless she goes in early and even then...). It absolutely sucks to be the smallest, youngest kid in your class for most of your school career.

    Edit: Maybe it would be less of a big deal for girls, I couldn't say.

    I hear the opposite is pretty common now (academic red shirting). The thinking is that being older means the kid is more likely to be emotionally mature and a "leader" amongst their friends/class or whatever, which will carry on throughout their education. The 1 yr age difference makes little to no difference for employment, etc.

    I think at younger ages, academics are pretty low on the list of what I want my kids to achieve at school. My primary focus is on having enjoying school, making friends, learning to interact with kids their age or similar ages, emotional maturity, etc. Of course I want them to learn the academic basics too, but I'm less concerned about those things.

    dennisexisCarpyDisruptedCapitalist
  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited October 8
    Both academically:
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/08/18/544483397/oldest-kids-in-class-do-better-even-through-college

    And socially:
    https://www.psychnewsdaily.com/high-school-popularity-study-shows-oldest-kids-in-the-class-also-the-most-popular/

    Score another win for Montessori, I guess. :grin:

    Edit: Realized I didn't say why. Because each classroom is a mix of three years of age. Kids have the experience of being among the youngest and among the oldest.

    dennis on
    DisruptedCapitalist
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    The youngest turns 4 in a few days and we've been debating on putting her in school a year early. She knows how to spell her name, the alphabet front and back, counts to 30 in English, counts to 10 in Korean, and knows how to spell all of her friends names.

    Our issue is not being able to sit still in a classroom.

    I went into Kindergarten at 4 and some change and I'd honestly advise against it (unless like all of her friends will end up a year ahead of her unless she goes in early and even then...). It absolutely sucks to be the smallest, youngest kid in your class for most of your school career.

    Edit: Maybe it would be less of a big deal for girls, I couldn't say.

    I went in at 4 and was picked on for being the biggest.

    But kids are assholes and will find a reason to pick on other kids anyway.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    exisAbsoluteZero
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    edited October 7
    I got a 100% (with an asterisk) on a very important test at my son’s back-to-school night.

    itc6gg2tzm1h.jpeg

    The asterisk is because, while his favorite animal is a cat, most of the time, it’s also sometimes a frog because the other day he held one and it was really cool.

    Elvenshae on
    dennisMNC DoverKayne Red RobeBanzai5150CarpyelectricitylikesmeDisruptedCapitalistShadowfire
  • shadowaneshadowane Registered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    I got a 100% (with an asterisk) on a very important test at my son’s back-to-school night.

    itc6gg2tzm1h.jpeg

    The asterisk is because, while his favorite animal is a cat, most of the time, it’s also sometimes a frog because the other day he held one and it was really cool.

    I thought it was because gum is not a candy you monster.

    kimeschussJebus314
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Not only is it candy, it's his favorite candy. Even more than chocolate and Twizzlers, his runners-up. :D

  • MNC DoverMNC Dover Full-time Voice Actor Kirkland, WARegistered User regular
    Need a voice actor? Hire me at bengrayVO.com
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  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    One of those kids is going to survive a horror movie with a wide margin of safety.

    The other is going to disappear in the first act and reappear in the third to swing a nail bat into a surprised antagonist.

    MNC DoverAntinumericMulysaSemproniusDisruptedCapitalistElvenshae
  • MNC DoverMNC Dover Full-time Voice Actor Kirkland, WARegistered User regular
    One of those kids is going to survive a horror movie with a wide margin of safety.

    The other is going to disappear in the first act and reappear in the third to swing a nail bat into a surprised antagonist.

    Man, this could not be more true.

    Need a voice actor? Hire me at bengrayVO.com
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  • CroakerBCCroakerBC TorontoRegistered User regular
    I would appreciate it if my child could get over his three week cold, so I can stop spending the weekends watching Zootopia.

    urahonkyKayne Red RobekimeMichaelLCShadowfireCarpydennisElvenshae
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Related to MNC, I was browsing Spirit Halloween about to head out when a mom with two kids started walking in.
    The teen went past the big display with the 8ft creatures no problem but the younger kid wasn't so sure, wanting reassurance that the big things don't make noise.

    So of course I hit the pad to set off the decorations as I left.

    CalicaKayne Red RobeAbsoluteZeroCarpyMNC DoverElvenshaespool32
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Today my 4yo climbed up a playset, sat at the top of a curving enclosed slide, and got scared. No amount of encouragement from me could get her to slide down. I told her I would be looking at her sliding through each of the three windows on the side of the slide, but no dice. Instead she climbed back down and asked to see the windows. She looked through each one, and checked the bottom of the slide.

    Then she climbed back up while mumbling about conquering her fears. And she sat down at the top of the slide.

    And slid down.

    I'm so very proud of her.

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  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Today my 4yo climbed up a playset, sat at the top of a curving enclosed slide, and got scared. No amount of encouragement from me could get her to slide down. I told her I would be looking at her sliding through each of the three windows on the side of the slide, but no dice. Instead she climbed back down and asked to see the windows. She looked through each one, and checked the bottom of the slide.

    Then she climbed back up while mumbling about conquering her fears. And she sat down at the top of the slide.

    And slid down.

    I'm so very proud of her.

    Future structural engineer.

    RichyAbsoluteZeroKayne Red RobeCarpyJebus314MichaelLCSleepElvenshaewobblyheadedbobHappylilElfspool32
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Damn it. Apparently the kids (8 and 11 ages, my son is 7) in the neighborhood have been making fun of my son because he doesn't know any sports players. That's because I find sports (yes, all sports) incredibly dumb and boring. So now I feel really bad that it's indirectly caused him to get bullied by his friends.

    MNC DoverDisruptedCapitalistkimedennisAbsoluteZero
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