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Fixing an attic Dryer Vent, a question of methods!

EncEnc A Fool with CompassionThe Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
So this is my situation:
4kiz8a9qz77f.png

In my attic, my dryer vent came loose from the actual exterior vent, and its just fluffing out hot air and some lint on top of the blown insulation (pink) across my attic. Its about 8 feet above the wooden slats, and there are no plywood planks beneath it.

I have duct tape and a 6 foot ladder. The plywood planks I have for my attic are securely drilled in place.

Whats the safest way for me to get that ladder under the vent, through about 3 feet square of blown insulation beneath it, so I can fix this issue?

XaquinThro

Posts

  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    I'm not sure the distance between the joists, but I'd guesstimate 2ft.

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited July 25
    Grab some more plywood cut just small enough to fit through your access hatch, but long enough to spread across 3 or 4 of your joists. Haul it up and lay it down over the joists where you need to put up your ladder.

    Edit: I'd also not use duct tape. It will lose its stick through time, especially with temp swings in an uninsulated attic. Just grab your drill and drive in a few self-tapping sheet metal screws to permanently affix. You could also use some foil tape to seal it up if you'd like.

    Simpsonia on
    bowenSoggybiscuitElvenshaeBrodyMugsleyAnon the Felonspool32ShadowfireBahamutZEROThroBhow
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    This is a dryer vent? Make sure you clean this out every year too, vertical rises like that clog big time.

    Is there a way to drill through an exterior wall to shorten this run?

    Ladies.
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Unfortunately I have no drill, and next to no free cash for this. I can swing some plywood (I'm assuming some 3/4 thick sanded? Or should I look for something else?).

    Need a moderate-timeframe fix while I handle medical debt this year. Going to eventually run it out my garage wall, but for now I'm stuck with this fashion.

  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    I'd attach the thing with a hose clamp, a few bucks will buy you one with a toggle clamp and make it not horrible to take on and off to clean.

    As for securing the ladder I'd assume plywood over the joists for where you need the ladder. Probably nail it in place? Not see it doing anything bad hanging out up there. Without a shitload of other weight you won't put the center of gravity over the existing plywood platform.

    XaquinbowenDaenrismtsdispatch.oEncAnon the FelonThro
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    If you have a second 6 foot ladder you can borrow you can make a platform to work on

    Something like this
    scaffolding_3_1.jpg

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    yup that should work for sure

    nail it down, leave it up there, bring your ladder up

    If you can't find the toggle clamp they have some that have thumbscrews and wing nuts that are like $3 more than the normal flat head ones

    Ladies.
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    Grab some more plywood cut just small enough to fit through your access hatch, but long enough to spread across 3 or 4 of your joists. Haul it up and lay it down over the joists where you need to put up your ladder.

    Edit: I'd also not use duct tape. It will lose its stick through time, especially with temp swings in an uninsulated attic. Just grab your drill and drive in a few self-tapping sheet metal screws to permanently affix. You could also use some foil tape to seal it up if you'd like.

    Duct tape, ironically not great for ducts.

    steam_sig.png
    bowenzepherinJebus314EncMichaelLCMugsleyspool32ShadowfireBahamutZERODonnictonGnizmoThro
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    they have duct tape though which is not duck tape and is a metal backed one does work, but a clamp as mentioned is easier.

    8ft is not terrible, i wouldn't drag a ladder up there though, a stepstool is easier and you need a smaller footprint. just bring some plywood up there to span the gaps and allows for a stable base.

    I would also consider boxing out where the vent enters the attic so the vent port is clear of insulation

    camo_sig.png
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Thanks, all! Going to measure this weekend and execute the plan next weekend after payday. I'll send pictures when im done.

  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    You shouldn't use screws on dryer ducts since they'll catch the lint. It's fine for basically every other kind of ducting though.
    Clamps or that metal tape.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    I'd attach the thing with a hose clamp, a few bucks will buy you one with a toggle clamp and make it not horrible to take on and off to clean.

    As for securing the ladder I'd assume plywood over the joists for where you need the ladder. Probably nail it in place? Not see it doing anything bad hanging out up there. Without a shitload of other weight you won't put the center of gravity over the existing plywood platform.

    Unless I am mistaken, hose clamps only really work if one section of the ducting is soft and the other is rigid. If this is just a tear in the middle of the soft duct it wont work. And if both ends are rigid then it wont work.

    As a first step you are going to want to make sure that one end fits inside the other end and it isn't just like a strait section (of equal sizes) that broke.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited July 26
    Well the vent should be going through the floor/roof through some piping like pvc and not a soft vent assuming its code, then reconnect with flexible one.might want to consider running some support lines to the roof to support the tubing so it is not directly hanging off the clamps also

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    some dryer vent tubing is semi-rigid which the clamps will still work on

    Ladies.
    zepherin
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    Grab some more plywood cut just small enough to fit through your access hatch, but long enough to spread across 3 or 4 of your joists. Haul it up and lay it down over the joists where you need to put up your ladder.

    Edit: I'd also not use duct tape. It will lose its stick through time, especially with temp swings in an uninsulated attic. Just grab your drill and drive in a few self-tapping sheet metal screws to permanently affix. You could also use some foil tape to seal it up if you'd like.

    Duct tape, ironically not great for ducts.

    Yeah I was going to suggest getting HVAC tape but if money is an issue, then duct tape will be fine. Get a hose clamp if your can; those are like $6.

    For the ladder, will probably need another piece of plywood , the gap sounds to big.

    "Never believe management about anything anywhere." -Aistan
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    I have a semi-rigid out-pipe, and the issue appears to be that the roofers, when reinstalling everything, forgot to secure the pipe more than by friction and just sliding them in place. They fit fine, I just need to get in there to make it work. Going to try the clamp plus duct tape. It needs to last for a year, give or take, so that should be enough for now.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    @Enc You don't need sanded plywood for an attic (...imo?).

    If you have your measurements, you can buy raw sheets of plywood at HD/Lowe's and have them cut to what you need, for free. Bring the "scrap" home for other projects.

    EncHappylilElf
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    some dryer vent tubing is semi-rigid which the clamps will still work on

    i think he was thinking he was patching the middle of the vent tube

    camo_sig.png
    Jebus314
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited July 27
    One thing to note though, if you care about that sort of thing, is that depending on where you live semi-rigid duct (or anything other than perfectly smooth rigid ducts) is not up to code requirements for dryer ducts. Now that said I'm sure millions of people have semi-rigid ductwork and it's just fine, but just saying that if you're going to sell anytime in the near future, or have permitted work done, it's something an inspector (city or home) would catch (also insurance inspectors if you have a fire).

    Simpsonia on
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    edited July 28
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    One thing to note though, if you care about that sort of thing, is that depending on where you live semi-rigid duct (or anything other than perfectly smooth rigid ducts) is not up to code requirements for dryer ducts. Now that said I'm sure millions of people have semi-rigid ductwork and it's just fine, but just saying that if you're going to sell anytime in the near future, or have permitted work done, it's something an inspector (city or home) would catch (also insurance inspectors if you have a fire).
    Using rigid duct for dryer vents is pretty new code wise (2012 I think). Most places still use flex duct and have not transitioned.

    zepherin on
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    We just bought and this was up to code

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    edited July 28
    Enc wrote: »
    We just bought and this was up to code
    So code is based on year of construction. Some code items are must update to sell/renovate and other code items are must install if new construction. Because it’s not an active hazard it’s likely not going to be something that needs updating to sell. Also your jurisdiction matters, and it may have not been on the inspection checklist.

    zepherin on
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    All that is great and all, but again I'm on a budget looking for a "right now" solution rather than the permanant solution, which will be early next year when I re-run the entire line. Thank you for your vigilance, though.

    zepherin
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    All that is great and all, but again I'm on a budget looking for a "right now" solution rather than the permanant solution, which will be early next year when I re-run the entire line. Thank you for your vigilance, though.
    I’d put it off until sale. I was merely being academic about the thing.

  • AlexPAlexP Registered User new member
    Unless you want to have some DIY fun, I recommend you call an expert, this is a complicated issue even though it seems simple

  • Anon the FelonAnon the Felon In bat country.Registered User regular
    Silicone, my man.

    If your outvent is semi rigid, gloop on a 1/4" to 1/2" bead of exterior/outdoor silicone. Slide ductwork over it (I'm assuming there's a liner/backer on the inside of the tube still and it's not just one of those fluffly insulation lined duct tubes. I'm not duct man, so pardon my lack of jargon.). Apply pressure. Wait. Leave.

    Depending on ambient heat, the silicone might take a minute to kick off. Once set you should have successfully glued the two pieces together and will need to destroy the first few inches of the duct to liberate it.

    If you don't have ductwork to spare, don't do this. I'm assuming you'll just cut off of the offending 6" and put in a new outvent or sit on the back porch with a beer and painstakingly remove the silicone when you redo this.

    I would only start gluing stuff together if I couldn't find a large enough diameter hoseclamp at the store. If you can't find one at a big box store, most "industrial hardware" type stores have a way deeper catalog and the ability to go "Oh, yeah Jim down at 'Pipes Plus' has a 10" clamp. Just head down 16th". Something missing from big box stores because no one knows anything there.

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