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[Canada] is also staying home and washing their hands

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    Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    there can't be TWO satans!

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    UnbrokenEvaUnbrokenEva HIGH ON THE WIRE BUT I WON'T TRIP ITRegistered User regular
    Yes was a very popular band, I don't know what to tell you

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    SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    there can't be TWO satans!

    eh hem

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    LordSolarMachariusLordSolarMacharius Red wine with fish Registered User regular
    #pipe wrote: »
    Roundabouts are great, actually.

    Roundabouts tend to be great, when people are used to them. For people who aren't, they cause nerves/a panic.

    I had friends who lived in a neighbourhood with one - the only one in the city - and it was a traffic accident hot spot.

    There's another (bigger one) by the Sapporo brewery which works fine but the one towards the Ancaster Fairgrounds is a pain (someone decided to put some spruce trees in the middle of it so that you can't see oncoming traffic).

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    Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    edited October 2022
    FOUR

    FOUR SATANS

    ch8lb1a2jsdr.jpg

    Magic Pink on
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    PsykomaPsykoma Registered User regular
    Hello Canada

    Let's read about Quebecois swears

    The Delightful Perversity of Québec’s Catholic Swears


    Some fun sections:
    “I have heard that people swear with the things they are afraid of,” says Olivier Bauer, a Swiss professor of religion who taught at the Université de Montréal and lived in the city for a decade. “So for English speaking people it’s sex, in Québec it is the church, and in France or Switzerland it is maybe more sexual or scatalogical.” Fear and power kind of tie together; swear words tend to be words that invoke something mysterious or scary or uncomfortable, and by using them we can tap into a bit of that power. (Yiddish, the swear words of which I grew up hearing, has about a dozen curses referring to the penis. I’m not sure which category that falls into.)

    The sacres is the group of Catholic swears unique to Québec. There are many of them; the most popular are probably tabarnak (tabernacle), osti or hostie or estie (host, the bread used during communion), câlisse (chalice), ciboire (the container that holds the host), and sacrament (sacrament). These usually have some milder forms as well, slightly modified versions that lessen their blow. “For example, tabarnouche and tabarouette are non-vulgar versions of tabarnak, similar to ‘shoot’ and ‘darn’ in English,” says Polesello.

    The sacres typically are interchangeable, rarely having any particular meaning by themselves. Most often you’ll hear them used as all-purpose exclamations. If a Québecois stubs his or her toe, the resulting swears might be “tabarnak, tabarnak!” instead of “fuck fuck fuck.” They can be inserted into regular sentences the way English swears can to vulgarly emphasize your statement. “For example, un cave means ‘an idiot,’ but un estie de cave means ‘a fucking idiot,’” says Polesello.

    Because the words are largely just meaningless statements of rage, there is an interesting ability in Québec French to create fantastic new strings of profanity that are, basically, untranslatable. Essentially you can just list sacres, connecting them with de, forever. Crisse de câlisse de sacrament de tabarnak d’osti de ciboire!, you might say after the Canadiens fail to make the NHL playoffs. The closest English translation would be something like “Fucking fuck shit motherfucker cockface asshole!” Or thereabouts. But strings of profanity like that in American English, though not unheard of, are certainly not common. In Québec, letting loose with a string of angrily shouted Catholic terminology is something you’re fairly likely to hear at some point.



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    DaimarDaimar A Million Feet Tall of Awesome Registered User regular
    Psykoma wrote: »
    Hello Canada

    Let's read about Quebecois swears

    The Delightful Perversity of Québec’s Catholic Swears


    Some fun sections:
    “I have heard that people swear with the things they are afraid of,” says Olivier Bauer, a Swiss professor of religion who taught at the Université de Montréal and lived in the city for a decade. “So for English speaking people it’s sex, in Québec it is the church, and in France or Switzerland it is maybe more sexual or scatalogical.” Fear and power kind of tie together; swear words tend to be words that invoke something mysterious or scary or uncomfortable, and by using them we can tap into a bit of that power. (Yiddish, the swear words of which I grew up hearing, has about a dozen curses referring to the penis. I’m not sure which category that falls into.)

    The sacres is the group of Catholic swears unique to Québec. There are many of them; the most popular are probably tabarnak (tabernacle), osti or hostie or estie (host, the bread used during communion), câlisse (chalice), ciboire (the container that holds the host), and sacrament (sacrament). These usually have some milder forms as well, slightly modified versions that lessen their blow. “For example, tabarnouche and tabarouette are non-vulgar versions of tabarnak, similar to ‘shoot’ and ‘darn’ in English,” says Polesello.

    The sacres typically are interchangeable, rarely having any particular meaning by themselves. Most often you’ll hear them used as all-purpose exclamations. If a Québecois stubs his or her toe, the resulting swears might be “tabarnak, tabarnak!” instead of “fuck fuck fuck.” They can be inserted into regular sentences the way English swears can to vulgarly emphasize your statement. “For example, un cave means ‘an idiot,’ but un estie de cave means ‘a fucking idiot,’” says Polesello.

    Because the words are largely just meaningless statements of rage, there is an interesting ability in Québec French to create fantastic new strings of profanity that are, basically, untranslatable. Essentially you can just list sacres, connecting them with de, forever. Crisse de câlisse de sacrament de tabarnak d’osti de ciboire!, you might say after the Canadiens fail to make the NHL playoffs. The closest English translation would be something like “Fucking fuck shit motherfucker cockface asshole!” Or thereabouts. But strings of profanity like that in American English, though not unheard of, are certainly not common. In Québec, letting loose with a string of angrily shouted Catholic terminology is something you’re fairly likely to hear at some point.



    All of this holds true for a small group of towns in northern Alberta as well.

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    ElaroElaro Apologetic Registered User regular
    I was originally just going to post this article about how Denis Villeneuve tried to sneak in a 'tabarnak' in DUNC, but Psykoma's post reminded me of another Quebec swears-related item.

    Lorembarnak, the procedurally-generated Quebecois swear generator*

    * Now a VSCode plugin and npm/yarn package, for all your expletive-loaded lorem ipsum needs.

    Children's rights are human rights.
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