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Captain [MARVEL] Vs. The Evil Avengers

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  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    BlankZoeChincymcchillaWeedLordVegetaSatanIsMyMotorThe Cow KingCentipede DamascusDouglasDangerMidnitedarunia106BloodsheedLegacy
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    BlankZoe wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    I am uncomfortable with a Native American/ First Nations Character immediately dismissing even the concept that a group of people can have quality schools.
    She was dismissing because of her own personal experiences?

    Like they are reminiscing about their time as X-Men and Dani Moonstar had a ROUGH FUCKIN TIME as a New Mutant and also in life before she joined the X-Men (brief looks into her past involve being bullied by kids who she was friends with at school for being Native and watching one of them die in her arms)

    I absolutely buy her being cynical about education as an institution rather than a small scale personal thing

    No, she's dismissing the concept of Human education as a whole. At least, that's what it looks like to me.

    Dani, being indigenous, would also have a certain cultural pov on the concept of schooling as it relates to smaller populations in North America what with the whole residential schooling situation in NA's past.

    This is exactly my position, yes.

    I'm confused because it sounded like you were making the opposite point.

  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Man I know a lot of folks with that lack of faith in the current way that schools are structured

    That's uhh, that's not an uncommon sentiment

    I think the sentiment goes a bit further in their conversation, but yeah, that is a good point.

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  • akajaybayakajaybay Registered User regular
    Was Nanny a mutant? I need to look that up. I mean I guess she turned people into kids. I think I remembered it as a tech thing since she had the suit and ship etc.

  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    edited December 3
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.
    It is

    Like I said, the context is specifically that Sunspot and Dani are talking about their journey from kids to New Mutants to X-Men to here.

    Dani is saying she doesn't approve of traditional human education because it didn't work for her

    In New Mutants she was forced to juggle regular schooling with life or death struggles, being a Valkyrie and literally seeing death everywhere she goes, friends dying in front of her, etc. And while she loves her family (both biological and found) she had a particularly rough childhood that could have been made much easier with a different structure.

    She is happy that Krakoa is a chance for mutant children to get an education and upbringing in a way that is more conducive to A) mutants and the struggles they go through as their powers develop and B) doesn't adhere to an increasingly broken structure of outdated formal education.

    BlankZoe on
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  • FearghaillFearghaill If there is nothing but what we make in this world let us make goodRegistered User regular
    akajaybay wrote: »
    Was Nanny a mutant? I need to look that up. I mean I guess she turned people into kids. I think I remembered it as a tech thing since she had the suit and ship etc.

    her mutant power is a telepathy/mind control deal

    akajaybay
  • WeedLordVegetaWeedLordVegeta Registered User regular
    Dani Moonstar is so cool

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  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

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  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    Dani Moonstar is so cool
    I will always love Cannonball and Sunspot but yeah the highlight of my New Mutants read was really seeing how rad Dani is and how quickly she became the leader of that team

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    WeedLordVegeta
  • WeedLordVegetaWeedLordVegeta Registered User regular
    BlankZoe wrote: »
    Dani Moonstar is so cool
    I will always love Cannonball and Sunspot but yeah the highlight of my New Mutants read was really seeing how rad Dani is and how quickly she became the leader of that team

    I dig characters that blend together different marvel spheres of influence, you know this about me

    So dani moonstar is like a perfect weedlordvegeta character

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    BlankZoe
  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

    I think that's up for interpretation

    But even if that is the case, what is your issue with her saying that?

  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    I'm just confused because like

    The core of the X-School concept has always been "human schools are not equipped to properly train and educate mutants, so we will do it ourselves"

    Like even as far back as New Mutants that was the mission statement

    All that Dani is saying is that they previously didn't go far enough with that idea and now have an opportunity to do so free of having to follow the traditional school structure

    It isn't a very big leap to make

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  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    BlankZoe wrote: »
    Dani Moonstar is so cool
    I will always love Cannonball and Sunspot but yeah the highlight of my New Mutants read was really seeing how rad Dani is and how quickly she became the leader of that team

    I dig characters that blend together different marvel spheres of influence, you know this about me

    So dani moonstar is like a perfect weedlordvegeta character
    I also really loved how Cannonball just easily slid into live with Dwarves in Asgard

    Dude was almost a prince and has a standing welcome to stay with their king and his kin at any time

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    WeedLordVegetaCommander Zoom
  • FearghaillFearghaill If there is nothing but what we make in this world let us make goodRegistered User regular
    Sam Guthrie is just the goodest boy

    BlankZoeWeedLordVegetaCentipede DamascusCommander Zoomtzeentchlingnever dieMidniteBear_thescondDevlin_Dragonus
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited December 3
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

    I think that's up for interpretation

    But even if that is the case, what is your issue with her saying that?

    So if we see her as not talking about a personal experience, but a holistic view that a certain subgroup of people cannot properly educate their children, that leads to a lot of bad shit.

    Fencingsax on
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  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    Sam Guthrie is just the goodest boy
    1vioj2axgwh3.jpg

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    never dieCrippl3
  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

    I think that's up for interpretation

    But even if that is the case, what is your issue with her saying that?

    So if we see her as not talking about a personal experience, but a holistic view that a certain subgroup of people cannot properly educate their children, that leads to a lot of bad shit.
    She is specifically talking about her personal experience

    She and Bobby are talking about their history as X-Men and how kids on Krakoa will have a different shot than they did and the failures they experienced may not happen here

    Again

    You are reading a panel out of context

    with context it is extremely clear what she is saying

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  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

    I think that's up for interpretation

    But even if that is the case, what is your issue with her saying that?

    So if we see her as not talking about a personal experience, but a holistic view that a certain subgroup of people cannot properly educate their children, that leads to a lot of bad shit.

    That feels like a huge stretch to me.

    Humans aren't exactly a subgroup, they're the dominant paradigm of the planet.

    Like, maybe if she were a Shi'ar with no personal experience of educational system, yeah, that would feel problematic.

    But someone whose personal experience involves attending multiple schools that were actively a bad scene for her due to who she is? Someone who was oppressed by those dominant paradigms?

    Nah, I think she's fine.

    BlankZoeFearghaillChincymcchillanever dieMidniteStiltsBloodsheedshoeboxjeddy
  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    mxmarks wrote: »
    I just finished Stranger Things last night so I'm biased but the end text better say David Harbour will return because I love that dude in everything and would love him hanging out in the MCU.

    Also with her opening monologue in the trailer I'm very curious when this movie even takes place.

    Currently I am betting on him being a bit of a joke character that'll make a big damn sacrifice to show he's still a superhero.

    FencingsaxBionicPenguin
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

    I think that's up for interpretation

    But even if that is the case, what is your issue with her saying that?

    So if we see her as not talking about a personal experience, but a holistic view that a certain subgroup of people cannot properly educate their children, that leads to a lot of bad shit.

    You're twisting the intent in a weird way. She's saying that mutants have always been steeped in their own culture in such way that they will always be considered "other" just based on the virtue of who they are. While the Xavier school was a step towards targeted education for a population in need it never went far enough because they were still rooted in "human" culture. Now that Krakoa is a thing they have the opportunity to break free of those bonds and educate in a culturally relevant context Vs needing to be spoonfed their education with a side helping of human culture.

    Straightzi
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Okay, hold up a second with all this.

    What schools do y'all think Dani is talking about there?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the schools being referenced there are Xavier's/The Massachusetts Academy. The criticism she is levying is that maybe those schools shouldn't have been designed using the traditional American education model.

    Subtextually it could also be read as a criticism of the way that America has handled the education of Indigenous youth, but it feels pretty explicitly about the Xavier Academy to me.

    I thought it was talking about how basing the Xavier Academy (and subsequent subsidiaries) on "human ideologies and institutions" being insufficient because they (human ideologies and institutions) are fundamentally flawed.

    I think that's up for interpretation

    But even if that is the case, what is your issue with her saying that?

    So if we see her as not talking about a personal experience, but a holistic view that a certain subgroup of people cannot properly educate their children, that leads to a lot of bad shit.

    You're twisting the intent in a weird way. She's saying that mutants have always been steeped in their own culture in such way that they will always be considered "other" just based on the virtue of who they are. While the Xavier school was a step towards targeted education for a population in need it never went far enough because they were still rooted in "human" culture. Now that Krakoa is a thing they have the opportunity to break free of those bonds and educate in a culturally relevant context Vs needing to be spoonfed their education with a side helping of human culture.

    Ok. I think a lot of it is that I just don't see the split between human and mutant in the way they want me to, but that makes sense.

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    Commander Zoom
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    Gotcha. That said the narrative of mutants and humans being very different things is definitely a mainstay topic across just about every x-book ever made.

    Legacy
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited December 3
    I mean, in the context of the world, the onset of puberty suddenly meaning also the student could possibly have anything from eyes that are all one color to being made of ooblek or whatever, the education system would naturally require special needs accommodations that would obviously be woefully under to unfunded, but also the cause of this could be anything from biology to alien ancestry to literal magic, I think that actual policy would have developed. It would probably suck in the way policy does now, but I think it would suck in the context of the Marvel Universe, rather than ours, if that makes sense.

    But, who knows. Seems like a good idea for a comic book.

    Fencingsax on
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    nightmarenny
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited December 3
    Gotcha. That said the narrative of mutants and humans being very different things is definitely a mainstay topic across just about every x-book ever made.

    I think they say they are super different a lot, but the message of most of the books is that they aren't, really. Like, it's regular soap opera bullshit with powers. It's high school "does he like me I like her" stuff. The point used to be that the powers didn't make them anything besides regular kids. At least, that's what I thought. It's one reason why the relatively recent utter lean in of "No, we super are different species" is disconcerting to me.

    Fencingsax on
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    Commander Zoom
  • nightmarennynightmarenny Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    I mean, in the context of the world, the onset of puberty suddenly meaning also the student could possibly have anything from eyes that are all one color to being made of ooblek or whatever, the education system would naturally require special needs accommodations that would obviously be woefully under to unfunded, but also the cause of this could be anything from biology to alien ancestry to literal magic, I think that actual policy would have developed. It would probably suck in the way policy does now, but I think it would suck in the context of the Marvel Universe, rather than ours, if that makes sense.

    But, who knows. Seems like a good idea for a comic book.

    I mean other than mutants all those other ways of developing super powers are absurdly rare right?

    Quire.jpg
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    I mean, in the context of the world, the onset of puberty suddenly meaning also the student could possibly have anything from eyes that are all one color to being made of ooblek or whatever, the education system would naturally require special needs accommodations that would obviously be woefully under to unfunded, but also the cause of this could be anything from biology to alien ancestry to literal magic, I think that actual policy would have developed. It would probably suck in the way policy does now, but I think it would suck in the context of the Marvel Universe, rather than ours, if that makes sense.

    But, who knows. Seems like a good idea for a comic book.

    I mean other than mutants all those other ways of developing super powers are absurdly rare right?

    Being a mutant is also absurdly rare.

    Or it used to be.

    One reason why special needs accommodations in 616 would be woefully underfunded!

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  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    Being a mutant was only ever absurdly rare post House of X and just after Avengers vs. X-Men

    Otherwise it was shown to be an increasingly common occurrence with millions of mutants worldwide as time went on

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  • ChincymcchillaChincymcchilla Registered User regular
    Yeah even in early x-men comics the whole point was people were freaked because they were everywhere suddenly

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  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    I really want an X-Men registration story that centers around the idea of registration getting you a mutant IEP now

    Give me some sentinel services in a classroom at a school that only has a nurse one day a week

  • PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Gotcha. That said the narrative of mutants and humans being very different things is definitely a mainstay topic across just about every x-book ever made.

    I think they say they are super different a lot, but the message of most of the books is that they aren't, really. Like, it's regular soap opera bullshit with powers. It's high school "does he like me I like her" stuff. The point used to be that the powers didn't make them anything besides regular kids. At least, that's what I thought. It's one reason why the relatively recent utter lean in of "No, we super are different species" is disconcerting to me.

    The idea that mutants are an entirely separate species than humanity has been batted around for awhile in the X books. Xavier was against it, Magneto was for it, and Cyclops ended up embracing it. More than a few mutants have kept themselves separate from the X-Men because they don't buy into the full ideology.

    It's always been problematic, and it seems like Hickman's run is going to address what happens when mutants decide that they are separate and go their own way.

  • nightmarennynightmarenny Registered User regular
    The core premise of the X-men is that they are so much more common than a fluke super power that the people in charge are terrified of them. If nothing gets in the way mutants are supposed to be the majority some day.

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  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited December 3
    Yeah even in early x-men comics the whole point was people were freaked because they were everywhere suddenly

    I always thought it was "everywhere" like racists seeing people who speak any language that isn't English in America, not everywhere, like an occurrence that was actually common. It was becoming more and more common, but not actually something the average person has a lot of experience with yet.

    Fencingsax on
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  • I needed a gnome to post.I needed a gnome to post. i did meet some of the most insufferable people but, they also met meRegistered User regular
    mutant great replacement

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  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Yeah even in early x-men comics the whole point was people were freaked because they were everywhere suddenly

    I always thought it was "everywhere" like racists seeing people who speak any language that isn't English in America, not everywhere, like an occurrence that was actually common. It was becoming more and more common, but not actually something the average person has a lot of experience with yet.
    No it was definitely a very widespread thing

    Like throughout Claremonts run dozens of mutants pop up all the time and the Morlocks have a few hundred people living in the sewers

    And thats before the 90s boom

    By the time Genosha happened it alone had a population of 3 million prior to the genocide and New York had a whole mutant neighborhood in M-Town

    Every single person may not know a mutant personally, but it was definitely a part of the world at large and not something super rare

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  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    BlankZoe wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Yeah even in early x-men comics the whole point was people were freaked because they were everywhere suddenly

    I always thought it was "everywhere" like racists seeing people who speak any language that isn't English in America, not everywhere, like an occurrence that was actually common. It was becoming more and more common, but not actually something the average person has a lot of experience with yet.
    No it was definitely a very widespread thing

    Like throughout Claremonts run dozens of mutants pop up all the time and the Morlocks have a few hundred people living in the sewers

    And thats before the 90s boom

    By the time Genosha happened it alone had a population of 3 million prior to the genocide and New York had a whole mutant neighborhood in M-Town

    Every single person may not know a mutant personally, but it was definitely a part of the world at large and not something super rare

    I don't think we are disagreeing all that much, but that is probably more due to my lack of communication ability than anything.

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  • nightmarennynightmarenny Registered User regular
    edited December 3
    I think the physical aspect of education would be the tip of the iceberg when it comes to education for mutants. Like we teach what we teach and when because(Theoretically) most children of a certain age should have largely similar cognitive agilities. Obviously there are a ton of exceptions even in humanity but mutants are going to be largely unique and require unique curriculums. Turning part shark is bound to affect your cognitive ability in a way that is going to be more or less unprecedented. Psychics have a history of being able to literally pull a full understanding of a subject out of an experts head and sometimes retain all of that. Many mutants exhibit a natural affinity for some type of knowledge or another. Many other mutants have a great need to learn something or another in order to effectively/non-destructively use their powers.

    It would be a mess. Probably every mutant would need to be evaluated when they got their powers and a personal unique curriculum and way of learning would need to be created. Sticking a 20 genetically mutated kids in a room and trying to teach them the same subjects was bound to fail.

    nightmarenny on
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  • never dienever die Registered User regular
    Maddoc wrote: »
    If the apex of this run isn't "Oh no, we have fucked up by removing ourselves further from humanity", then they fucked up.

    But then I'm still of the opinion that they just made them Inhumans.

    I go back and forth on this. Cause like yeah, the answer to how do mutants handle being in the real world is removing them all into their own society can easily have some unfortunate implications. At the same time, they aren’t forcing mutants to live there, they are allowed to live there if they want to. And the Marvel universe is so actively hateful towards mutants that the majority of them are taking the offer. It’s providing mutants with a safe space to just be themselves and also giving them a political power they’ve not had before (it’s not much different than Jeans idea in X-Men Red honestly), to protect mutants.

  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    edited December 3
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    BlankZoe wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Yeah even in early x-men comics the whole point was people were freaked because they were everywhere suddenly

    I always thought it was "everywhere" like racists seeing people who speak any language that isn't English in America, not everywhere, like an occurrence that was actually common. It was becoming more and more common, but not actually something the average person has a lot of experience with yet.
    No it was definitely a very widespread thing

    Like throughout Claremonts run dozens of mutants pop up all the time and the Morlocks have a few hundred people living in the sewers

    And thats before the 90s boom

    By the time Genosha happened it alone had a population of 3 million prior to the genocide and New York had a whole mutant neighborhood in M-Town

    Every single person may not know a mutant personally, but it was definitely a part of the world at large and not something super rare

    I don't think we are disagreeing all that much, but that is probably more due to my lack of communication ability than anything.

    Regardless of what it used to be the new status quo has been explicit about the idea that mutants will out number humanity in just a handful of years.

    edit: Regardless I think the volume of mutants doesn't matter. It's the fact that their powers and abilities literally cause them to often interpret the world in different ways than regular humans. What's even more interesting is how the metatext around this has changed over the years along with the real world's view on race and cultural identity. Said another way we used to be much more about "Hey we're all the same underneath. We all bleed red!" whereas now as a society we are much more open to the idea of celebrating differences.

    It's actually an element of Hickman's relaunch that I hadn't really considered a lot before but now that I do I think it's a pretty neat way of showing "progress" in the medium in some respects.

    SatanIsMyMotor on
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    never die wrote: »
    Maddoc wrote: »
    If the apex of this run isn't "Oh no, we have fucked up by removing ourselves further from humanity", then they fucked up.

    But then I'm still of the opinion that they just made them Inhumans.

    I go back and forth on this. Cause like yeah, the answer to how do mutants handle being in the real world is removing them all into their own society can easily have some unfortunate implications. At the same time, they aren’t forcing mutants to live there, they are allowed to live there if they want to. And the Marvel universe is so actively hateful towards mutants that the majority of them are taking the offer. It’s providing mutants with a safe space to just be themselves and also giving them a political power they’ve not had before (it’s not much different than Jeans idea in X-Men Red honestly), to protect mutants.

    Part of it is beyond whatever triple cross Magneto, Xavier, and MacTaggart obviously have planned, Sinister and Apocalypse are also going to make their own plays, and possibly Krakoa has their own agenda as well. So I think the vast majority of the inhabitants of Krakoa may legitimately be there for that community, but it isn't necessarily going to turn out well.

    torchlight-sig-80.jpg
    Schmimpy Pim- no god what am I saying
  • Crippl3Crippl3 oh noRegistered User regular
    Here's my hard-hitting Black Widow trailer analysis:

    That digital guitar/noise thing in the music was really cool

    JimothyMcFodderBear_thescond
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