[Canadian Politics] Take care. Listen to health authorities.

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  • ImperfectImperfect Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    My hometown everyone.

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
  • mrondeaumrondeau Montréal, CanadaRegistered User regular
    It's almost as if it would be a good idea to review the RCMP's use of force, in particular the tactics and training of RCMP officers.
    Also, for the OPP, RNC and SQ, and, in fact, any and all police organizations in the country.

    T-boltImperfectGnome-InterruptusCanadianWolverine
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    mrondeau wrote: »
    I don't know why the people of Acipenseridae Minor and Mexico would want to lower their standard of living by joining with parts of the US.

    Also, using something from the First Nations is right out, 'cause there's more than one. As exemplified by the fact that the Fraser river has multiple names, and I had to use the good old trick of using the Latin translation of the meaning of one of them to solve conflict between languages.

    (Acipenseridae Minor means "First things you traverse when travelling on the sturgeon river")

    We might be able to put something together from Chinook Jargon. Not specific to one nation or people, but doesn't cover the whole province either.

    :so_raven:
  • mrondeaumrondeau Montréal, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Corvus wrote: »
    mrondeau wrote: »
    I don't know why the people of Acipenseridae Minor and Mexico would want to lower their standard of living by joining with parts of the US.

    Also, using something from the First Nations is right out, 'cause there's more than one. As exemplified by the fact that the Fraser river has multiple names, and I had to use the good old trick of using the Latin translation of the meaning of one of them to solve conflict between languages.

    (Acipenseridae Minor means "First things you traverse when travelling on the sturgeon river")

    We might be able to put something together from Chinook Jargon. Not specific to one nation or people, but doesn't cover the whole province either.

    Hum, we could just cram a few other languages in there, including Sindarin and Klingon to really confuse future linguists, and use that, yes.


    That being said, "Chinook Jargon" is a terrible, terrible name. About as bad as Michif.
    Or Français, a language not spoken by any Frank, or English, a language not spoken by any Angles.

  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    You open the naming to the B.C. public and our new province name will probably be 420

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
    ApogeeCanadianWolverine
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    mrondeau wrote: »
    Corvus wrote: »
    mrondeau wrote: »
    I don't know why the people of Acipenseridae Minor and Mexico would want to lower their standard of living by joining with parts of the US.

    Also, using something from the First Nations is right out, 'cause there's more than one. As exemplified by the fact that the Fraser river has multiple names, and I had to use the good old trick of using the Latin translation of the meaning of one of them to solve conflict between languages.

    (Acipenseridae Minor means "First things you traverse when travelling on the sturgeon river")

    We might be able to put something together from Chinook Jargon. Not specific to one nation or people, but doesn't cover the whole province either.

    Hum, we could just cram a few other languages in there, including Sindarin and Klingon to really confuse future linguists, and use that, yes.


    That being said, "Chinook Jargon" is a terrible, terrible name. About as bad as Michif.
    Or Français, a language not spoken by any Frank, or English, a language not spoken by any Angles.

    This reply is not skookum. :P

    :so_raven:
    CanadianWolverine
  • CaedwyrCaedwyr Registered User regular
    BC is extra complicated because there were more distinct language groups in the one province than there were in the rest of the landmass that became Canada.

    This is a cool resource to use when trying to figure out the complexities of the various groups and languages of BC.

    https://native-land.ca/

    HadesCanadianWolverine
  • quovadis13quovadis13 Registered User regular
    You open the naming to the B.C. public and our new province name will probably be 420

    Province McProvinceface

    Caedwyr
  • ShadowenShadowen Snores in the morning Registered User regular
    I have become become oddly leery of "kids should learn coding mandatorily" proposals once it was explained to me that if everyone knows basic coding that drives down the wages for people in the tech sector.

    The tech sector, almost by definition, will keep growing as long as the industrial base is there to support it, so it's always struck me as governments thinking "let's keep labor cheap in one of the few perpetual growth industries by making literally every child able to code."

    (This is of course assuming retention of coding ability.

    I would also argue that "teaching children to code in school is mandatory" is not the same as, say, a mandatory technology literacy class to teach kids how to spot avenues for malware, protect one's data, and so on.)

    Gnome-InterruptusJacoby
  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever Registered User regular
    Shadowen wrote: »
    I have become become oddly leery of "kids should learn coding mandatorily" proposals once it was explained to me that if everyone knows basic coding that drives down the wages for people in the tech sector.

    The tech sector, almost by definition, will keep growing as long as the industrial base is there to support it, so it's always struck me as governments thinking "let's keep labor cheap in one of the few perpetual growth industries by making literally every child able to code."

    (This is of course assuming retention of coding ability.

    I would also argue that "teaching children to code in school is mandatory" is not the same as, say, a mandatory technology literacy class to teach kids how to spot avenues for malware, protect one's data, and so on.)

    I mean, that's not a bad thing. You may as well say "if we teach everyone to pump gas, gas station attendants will lose wages".

    Frankly, basic coding skills these days is mandatory for many many basic skills, like say making just about anything useful in Excel, or understanding at least a little bit of how to fix a computer - I've witnessed co-workers literally drop their laptops from a height of a foot, thinking it will shake the little machine out of its frozen state. More knowledge can't be worse...

    8R7BtLw.png
    Richymrondeau
  • The Cow KingThe Cow King scuz me ur under dog arrest Registered User regular
    edited June 25
    Eh im all for teaching kids as many skills as possible but math is more fundamental to programming since it can't exist without a basic understanding I mean it can but you not learning how it works

    My adversions is because I do believe all education as all things is political and all avenues to expand education are focused on impressing that we live in a meritocracy capitialist society which is not fucking true lol, it also has a weird idolazation of libertarianism in that the only worthwhile advancements are made for prestiege and profit which is demonstrably not true and I'm only inferring this from my many failed years of school that hammered home the hilarious point of finding a niche industry to exploit in a sea of monopolies but only for personal profit

    As evidence to my point the cons introducing finacial literacy to get kids used to avoid expenses or to be frugal and minimalize what their labour is worth cause a bunch off bullshit debt exists which is from reckless disregard for future genrations and also lol if the us is ever going to pay off the debt it holds to the world they've signaled multiple times over decades they don't care why are we enslaving our kids to investors seeking infinite returns of investment from basic human rights unless we put those in a commodity market of course

    I never learned how house buying worked cause it wasn't realistic for my generation lmao

    The Cow King on
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    ArcticLancerCanadianWolverine
  • PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    Realistically a huge fraction probably won't like it anyway, programming was the universally second most hated first year engineering course. Plus it's getting stuffed into math class, I expect that it will be a fairly minor component overall

    shryke
  • NosfNosf Registered User regular
    Teach 'em how to fix a toilet while you're at it. That wound up being as valuable as Pythagorean Theorem to me. A lot of the so called "ne'er do wells" from high school that I know of wound up in the trades and wound up doing pretty well. No idea how it is now, but we did shop class in 7 and 8 for one afternoon every couple of weeks and it was basic work and metal working. I'd like to think they force kids to do more than that now, and not just boys in shop and girls in home ec. How does a toilet work? How do you fix a dripping tap and so on.

    Gnome-InterruptusInvectivusSteelhawkCanadianWolverine
  • TubularLuggageTubularLuggage Registered User regular
    At my junior high, each year you had a mandatory block in your schedule, where everybody rotated through shop class, home-ec, and a basic computer class. I don't remember exactly what the scheduling was, but it seemed like a decent system. It's been years though, and I have no idea if they still do that.

    We also had one high school course, where half the semester was Physically Active Lifestyles (as I remember, basically gym with a bit thrown in about nutrition), and the other half was Career Life Management, which included things like budgeting and job interviews, among other things.

    ShadowhopeGnome-InterruptusBouwsT
  • NosfNosf Registered User regular
    edited June 25
    Back in the day, we had one semester of Phys Ed required over your 9-12. Back then you had to take typing too. On typewriters. They weren't electric. Actually, I think there was an advanced typewriting class that had electric ones. Holy shit, playing Everquest for years made me a better typist than that class ever did.

    Nosf on
    WiseManTobes
  • ShadowhopeShadowhope Baa. Registered User regular

    I’ve come to the realization that I think about our westernmost province differently based on which name is used.

    When I hear “British Colombia” I think of settlers creating a Victorian city and calling it Victoria and of modern immigrants from Hong Kong wearing great suits in amid the skyscrapers of Vancouver. When I hear “BC” I think of guys with great beards eating granola and smoking pot and people in MEC gear hiking around mountains. It’s a somewhat weird mixture of prejudices that I have that I’m suddenly very aware of.

    Wash your hands like you've been cutting habaneros and need to put in your contacts.
    CanadianWolverine
  • ImperfectImperfect Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Nah, learning coding from a good age is Good, Actually, but not for the reasons you may think.

    Structured logic and problem-solving are things that become very difficult to learn as an adult, if you did not learn those skills as a child. Coding itself may not be terribly useful to every child, but that experience working through those problems in a logical way will make a huge difference if they do end up in a career where those skills count. Plus, depending on how the curriculum is taught, I mean 90% of my job is "looking stuff up on Google (more Duck Duck Go these days, but I digress...)", which sounds silly, but actually translates into "doing research." Learning how to effectively do your own individual research to solve a problem is so broadly-applicable everywhere, that yeah, more kids could stand to learn that from a young age.

    Also, as a well-paid programmer, I don't especially care for the argument that teaching more kids to code will reduce the pay for our jobs. This isn't a field like gas station attendants, because there is a definite career path in programming that is both broad and deep. Sure, junior wages may come down, but there are a multitude of ways to develop your skills to an intermediate or senior level without slogging through poor-paying jobs. You'll never hear about an "indie gas station attendant".

    Plus, there are far broader, more insidious, and more effective things at work, working on bringing down programmer salaries. A whole lot of companies, for example, are looking to try to use the "WFH" leverage as an opportunity to shit on workers who are working from less-expensive areas and reduce their pay so that it is "more fair" to their co-workers who have moved to more-expensive areas. Plus, just, capitalists being capitalists. The problem is rarely, if ever, under-privileged people trying to raise themselves up.

    Nova_CRichymrondeauShadowhopeSteelhawkT-boltCanadianWolverineAegisApogee
  • ArcticLancerArcticLancer Best served chilled. Registered User regular
    At my junior high, each year you had a mandatory block in your schedule, where everybody rotated through shop class, home-ec, and a basic computer class. I don't remember exactly what the scheduling was, but it seemed like a decent system. It's been years though, and I have no idea if they still do that.

    We also had one high school course, where half the semester was Physically Active Lifestyles (as I remember, basically gym with a bit thrown in about nutrition), and the other half was Career Life Management, which included things like budgeting and job interviews, among other things.
    Man, all I remember about PAL/CLM was it being woefully inadequate to prepare you for anything of the sort. I think maybe it allowed us to get elective CPR certification though? That part was a great idea at least.
    Otherwise, I wish I got to spend more time in shop class because I always liked building thingsand grew up with no access to those kinds of tools, and home-ec was fantastic as it at least made an effort to try and teach people how to prepare food. There were valuable lessons in that one (we maybe spent a bit much time on sewing comparatively, and I could have done with more cooking).

    ZibblsnrtCanadianWolverine
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Teaching coding to first-graders starting today means more programmers on the market... 20 years from now. If the problem the Cons are trying to tackle is "programmers today are paid too damn much", they're certainly taking a long-game solution to it. Also, teaching programming in school doesn't directly translate to more programmers in university. I mean, I learned history and economics in school too, and didn't become a historian or an economist.

    As @Imperfect and @Apogee said, the main benefits will be teaching kids computer literacy and logical structured problem-solving skills. Both net benefits for their futures, no matter what they choose to do in life.

    sig.gif
    mrondeauShadowhopeCanadianWolverine
  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Teaching coding to first-graders starting today means more programmers on the market... 20 years from now. If the problem the Cons are trying to tackle is "programmers today are paid too damn much", they're certainly taking a long-game solution to it. Also, teaching programming in school doesn't directly translate to more programmers in university. I mean, I learned history and economics in school too, and didn't become a historian or an economist.

    As @Imperfect and @Apogee said, the main benefits will be teaching kids computer literacy and logical structured problem-solving skills. Both net benefits for their futures, no matter what they choose to do in life.

    also just having enough coding skills to set up basic scripts and handle more advanced general computing problems can be really useful in professions that aren't strictly "computer programmer"

    like being able to automate uploads to a server or batch process documents, or script some basic data processing in excel are things that can touch a very large range of jobs in the service economy

  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Computers are foreign to young people.... I know more about computers at 40 than any sub-25 year old i have met with the exception of some hardcore gamers and IT nerds. We had to fucking wrangle our PC's in the day.... Kid just sees it as an appliance.

    On another note:

    society sure loves to spend gobs of money on persecuting the poor instead of you know, actually helping them.

    Also, fuck Winnipeg. Only went there once and it was quite the experience... Had a cashier threaten to stab me after I asked her to get off her phone to take my order after standing there for 5 min.

    PSN: Canadian_llama
    BroloArcticLancerCanadianWolverinehomogenized
  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    I hate state-sponsored initiatives that are designed to persecute the homeless.

    If you won't let them sleep under a fucking bridge, where the fuck do you want them to go?

    Disco11Gnome-InterruptusShadowenBionicPenguinCanadianWolverineShadowhopeThe Cow KingLordSolarMachariushomogenizedBouwsT
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Brolo wrote: »
    I hate state-sponsored initiatives that are designed to persecute the homeless.

    If you won't let them sleep under a fucking bridge, where the fuck do you want them to go?

    The answer is "Away"

    PSN: Canadian_llama
    ArcticLancerShadowhopeApogee
  • SteelhawkSteelhawk Registered User regular
    Shadowen wrote: »
    I have become become oddly leery of "kids should learn coding mandatorily" proposals once it was explained to me that if everyone knows basic coding that drives down the wages for people in the tech sector.

    How is this not seen as a gross and entirely selfish motive by someone who wants to keep their salary high?

    Like, "Fuck these kids growing up in a world increasingly reliant on computers and technology. Daddy's gotta pay a new Porche!!"

  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Steelhawk wrote: »
    Shadowen wrote: »
    I have become become oddly leery of "kids should learn coding mandatorily" proposals once it was explained to me that if everyone knows basic coding that drives down the wages for people in the tech sector.

    How is this not seen as a gross and entirely selfish motive by someone who wants to keep their salary high?

    Like, "Fuck these kids growing up in a world increasingly reliant on computers and technology. Daddy's gotta pay a new Porche!!"

    @Shadowen that can be applied to any job. More mechanics? Lower prices. More lawyers? Fee's go down etc etc etc

    PSN: Canadian_llama
  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    it also just isn't true

    the general population becoming more computer literate hasn't done anything to diminish wages in the tech sector

  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    The downward pressure on wages is a devaluation of labour.

    That said, the best I could do as a programmer was $30k a year before I abandoned that career path, back in 2008 (Crash made finding work in that biz untenable), so, I mean, yeah.

    Gnome-Interruptus
  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    At my junior high, each year you had a mandatory block in your schedule, where everybody rotated through shop class, home-ec, and a basic computer class. I don't remember exactly what the scheduling was, but it seemed like a decent system. It's been years though, and I have no idea if they still do that.

    We also had one high school course, where half the semester was Physically Active Lifestyles (as I remember, basically gym with a bit thrown in about nutrition), and the other half was Career Life Management, which included things like budgeting and job interviews, among other things.

    The highschool/junior high I went to in Medicine Hat had really great trades classes. We had a a decent Home EC room with 4 kitchens spaces each with their own appliances. Had a room for learning how to sew, use sewing machines, surgers cut fabric and make clothing.


    We had a great shop room with a big ass lathe, band saws, drill presses, a big electric spot welder, metal presses and things to bend metals, had a vacuum mold for plastics and a weird spinny thing that melted plastic pellets and spun them around to form hollow plastic balls.. not sure what else it could do. We also had leather working equipment and smaller wood working tools as well. There was small engine repair and rocketry (they were in the same area if I recall thats why I am lumping them.. we weren't making rocket powered lawn mower engines). Pretty sure we had a large engine program as well but I didn't end up taking it think I was a senior year program.

    We also had a fantastic visual communications, multimedia program. There was sound and video editing with fancy at the time video camera. A full screenprinting area with a 6 screen press, a big arc lamp for burning the image into the screen, a black and white and color photo darkrooms. Those courses got more indepth as you went along. The AV program also acted as a business too, lots of really nice screenprinted shirts for customers, which in turn provided cash to keep the equipment up to date.

    This was around 1993-94, I moved from the city in 94 so I didn't get a chance to do the grade 11 and 12 versions of the above courses. We had our computer room upgraded around that time too , Windows PCs running Windows NT which was a huge upgrade from the old Apple computers that were there.

    Was a pretty sweet High School all in all.

    TubularLuggage
  • ShadowenShadowen Snores in the morning Registered User regular
    Anyway my basic point was that I do not trust the motivations of the Ontario government, because they're always doing shit like this.



    (Laura Stone is a reporter for the Globe and Mail.)

  • CanadianWolverineCanadianWolverine Registered User regular
    Shadowhope wrote: »
    I’ve come to the realization that I think about our westernmost province differently based on which name is used.

    When I hear “British Colombia” I think of settlers creating a Victorian city and calling it Victoria and of modern immigrants from Hong Kong wearing great suits in amid the skyscrapers of Vancouver. When I hear “BC” I think of guys with great beards eating granola and smoking pot and people in MEC gear hiking around mountains. It’s a somewhat weird mixture of prejudices that I have that I’m suddenly very aware of.

    Had a friend who always said "BC stands for Bring Cash" after he moved back from Alberta.

    steam_sig.png
    Aridhol
  • NosfNosf Registered User regular
    edited June 25
    Locally they wanted them out from under the bridges for safety and such. They wound up placing tents downtown at a homeless shelter instead.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/london-ontario-homeless-overpass-adelaide-fence-1.5300515

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/why-are-people-living-in-tents-next-to-a-london-homeless-shelter-1.5381527

    Nosf on
    Gnome-Interruptus
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Disco11 wrote: »
    Brolo wrote: »
    I hate state-sponsored initiatives that are designed to persecute the homeless.

    If you won't let them sleep under a fucking bridge, where the fuck do you want them to go?

    The answer is "Away"

    Yeah. People want the homeless not to hang around in this or that spot. And there's some legitimate reasons for that. The problem is no one wants to actually deal with the issue causing the homeless to exist. I'd say a large part of that is that the solutions we do have to homelessness that seem to work are relatively new and mostly unknown, on top of being things that a lot of people (stupid or ignorant people mostly) gripe about on "principle". Which means it ends up being easier just trying to push the homeless somewhere else rather then actually dealing with the issue.

    mrondeauPhoenix-D
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Brolo wrote: »
    I hate state-sponsored initiatives that are designed to persecute the homeless.

    If you won't let them sleep under a fucking bridge, where the fuck do you want them to go?

    Another city, because idiots always believe homeless people are from somewhere else. They're wrong, but people keep thinking that.

    :so_raven:
  • NosfNosf Registered User regular
    IDK, I don't mind the dudes who camp on the front lawn at work and leave in the morning as I'm pulling in. Less keen on the needles everywhere. Put 'em in the garbage already. Also, the one dude who harasses the female staff and wants to know if they want to smoke some meth. Or flashes clients and their kids. IDK, I kinda don't feel a lot of compassion for that one, I kinda just want that one to disappear.

  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Being from a big city I thought I understood homelessness .... And then I went to Vancouver.

    Hastings is like another planet!

    PSN: Canadian_llama
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Nosf wrote: »
    IDK, I don't mind the dudes who camp on the front lawn at work and leave in the morning as I'm pulling in. Less keen on the needles everywhere. Put 'em in the garbage already. Also, the one dude who harasses the female staff and wants to know if they want to smoke some meth. Or flashes clients and their kids. IDK, I kinda don't feel a lot of compassion for that one, I kinda just want that one to disappear.

    Addiction changes your brain. That combined with the fact that Canada drops them like a hot potato makes being a "good member" of society less important.

    PSN: Canadian_llama
    ImperfectArcticLancerBroloCanadianWolverine
  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    Disco11 wrote: »
    Being from a big city I thought I understood homelessness .... And then I went to Vancouver.

    Hastings is like another planet!

    My brother lives there. It's...an experience.

  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Disco11 wrote: »
    Being from a big city I thought I understood homelessness .... And then I went to Vancouver.

    Hastings is like another planet!

    Welcome to the Downtown Eastside.

    :so_raven:
    CaedwyrDisco11
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Corvus wrote: »
    Disco11 wrote: »
    Being from a big city I thought I understood homelessness .... And then I went to Vancouver.

    Hastings is like another planet!

    Welcome to the Downtown Eastside.

    Looks like St-Catherines street in Montreal on a busy Saturday night..... At all times.

    Weirdly never felt unsafe though but would not want to wander there after it get's dark

    PSN: Canadian_llama
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