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[Giant Bomb] Noooooooooooooooo! :(

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    GlalGlal AiredaleRegistered User regular
    Yeah, but what you're describing is just bad faith abuse, not design as intended. Twitter is designed to prioritise engagement over clarity, context, safety or anything else that one would consider a cornerstone to communication.

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    SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    I was listening to The Hot Spot today from last week and kind of got the sense that Jeff/Vinnie are not at all happy about the sale to Red Ventures.

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    Undead ScottsmanUndead Scottsman Registered User regular
    I was listening to The Hot Spot today from last week and kind of got the sense that Jeff/Vinnie are not at all happy about the sale to Red Ventures.

    I got the exact opposite impression. They spent the majority of the podcast complaining about how CBSi basically had no idea what to do with them and were constantly treating them as inconsequential, while Red Venture seems to have a better handle on what Giant Bomb is and where to take it. (I think Jeff mentioned he was surprised when they suggested a Roku app, as that's something they had tried and failed to get made while at CBSi!)

    They seemed pretty jazzed about the aquisition, all told. I think Vinny is.. not salty, but breaking down the studio reopened some old wounds from working at CBSi, so I think that contributed to his crankiness.

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    HedgethornHedgethorn Associate Professor of Historical Hobby Horses In the Lions' DenRegistered User regular
    Agreed, I think they tried to paint a picture of a rosy future with Red Ventures. If they were really irate I don't think we'd hear about it on the Hotspot: Jeff and Vinny have been around long enough to know that it doesn't make sense to publicly complain about the new bosses before things really get started. Now's the time to be publicly optimistic and make any concerns known in-house before the new trajectories get fully fixed.

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    SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    Ok, that's good then. I was working while listening so probably missed stuff.
    There was one part in particular where Jeff was referencing terms he made with CBS when they bought GB not being honored where I got the the sense that he was throwing shade on both CBS and RV. Glad to hear I was likely misreading that.

    Either way, it was a really interesting episode.

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    HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    oh shit i'm way way behind on hotspot but this sounds like a required listen.

    is this the latest ep?

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    SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    I know a few of you probably aren't on the GB newsletter list, and there's way to see them on the site, so I decided to paste the latest one in here! It's about the GBEast studio, with a lengthy bit from Vinny and reflections from all current and former GBEasters:

    (spoilered for huge wall of text!)
    A few days ago, I was in our New York studio disconnecting everything and tearing it down. The physical space that the studio is in belongs to ViacomCBS, so seeing as we’re no longer part of that company it’s time to start packing our gear up and finding new digs. I have a real love/hate relationship with that studio. It was tiny and cramped. It had terrible climate control. The walls were a centimeter thick and let every outside sound in (and every inside sound out, or so I’ve been told). It even had networking and power issues. It was also mostly ours, and aside from the occasional shout or banging on the wall or ceiling, everybody left us alone to do our dark deeds in there.

    When Alex and I started Giant Bomb East we were sharing a studio space in Midtown Manhattan with TV Guide. It would be a bit longer before we joined Jeff Bakalar at our more familiar home at the 28th Street CBS office. Those 28th Street digs were actually under construction at the time. As far as I could tell, the previous producer from TV Guide had left fairly suddenly and the new production person we shared the studio with was left to figure a lot out. It’s hard to inherit a studio, and especially a control room, from somebody else. A lot of time cables are labelled when they are installed the first time but then keep those (now incorrect) labels as the wire is hastily moved onto a new purpose. I know I’m guilty of this, so I apologize to anyone that has had to deal with it as a result.

    As I mentioned, the 28th Street office (the one we were at for the majority of our time at CBS) was being renovated, with space being partitioned out for the different teams. We joined that conversation fairly late in the renovation process, so you can imagine how happy everyone was when I asked for some studio space. The arrangement we came to was TV Guide and Giant Bomb would share filming space and all the groups would share a common podcasting room. If I’m remembering correctly, this is what led to the size of our control room being roughly a third of our overall space. The producer for TV Guide, who was a lot of fun to work with, wanted enough space to have a control room and green room to use as they had actual TV folks coming in and out for shoots. It was a completely reasonable ask, and so we all agreed.

    Well, once we finally got that space walled off and moved in our stuff it was clear it would not meet their needs and I don’t think they ever shot a single thing in there. I don’t blame them, it was not an attractive shooting location. We had scavenged some old tables for control room surfaces, we sat on stools a foot from the wall with the camera another 3 feet from us. It had a window that opened up to the lunch tables which took up 70 percent of one wall. Initially, that window was not frosted so that’s why that screen you see in all our shots is there. It covers that window and the people on the other side just trying to each their lunch without being filmed doing it.

    It did have high enough ceilings to have a lighting grid installed, so that was definitely a plus. We also had a track with a green screen/curtain initially but never had the space to utilize it so we took it out. Lighting was always super difficult because of the tight space. It was hard to get separation between the background and the talent. As soon as you put any light on in the room the whole thing filled up. I’m not super great at lighting to begin with, but I’ve had enough experience to know this space was tough. We wound up closing down the cameras to darken the room and jacking up the brightness of the lights a lot to get something usable. Not too fun when people have spotlights blasting into their face from eight feet away. The bleed from the window and the control room lights didn’t help, but it didn’t hurt too much either. I think mostly it looked just fine, but you can see that between shows if something moved or the seating was slightly different it all had to be completely readjusted, and we just didn’t have that kind of time to spend before going live on each show.

    That was around the 4th or 5th studio I’d put together and luckily by that point and I knew pretty much how I wanted to handle the tech. I want to say, initially, I was aiming to come in under 10K for the entire setup. Video mixer, cameras, lights, converter boxes, audio mixer, microphones, recording devices, computers, etc. I think we made it, but it’s hard to remember exactly. Since it was just myself, Alex, and Austin I needed to build it so that I could control the show from the set. So that was my goal. Audio and video monitoring would have to all be essentially remote. I also wanted to build it out to be 4K ready, which we did. Now obviously, just because you can do something doesn’t mean it’s the best solution. Hosting (or even guesting on something) as well as running the production stinks, at least for me. I really disliked splitting my attention between those two responsibilities. I felt I could never give the production the attention it deserved, or needed. I was used to multiple camera switches, and really had to settle for locking into a shot for the duration with the hope that the audio didn’t change too dramatically during the course of a show. It worked, for the most part, but I always felt like I needed to keep a portion of my brain reserved to worry if the recordings were still rolling or the levels were ok. It wasn’t until Abby joined us that I was able to relax a bit and that tension started to ease while hosting something.

    When we got staffed up with Dan and Abby (and of course Alex) at Giant Bomb East we had enough people where I could spend more time in the control room during shows, which is a part of the job I truly love. I like seeing the waveforms bounce. I like seeing “time remaining” on the recording devices, and I find it extremely satisfying when everything is working as intended. I like knowing that I can solve an audio mix issue, or maybe find a dumb camera angle, or add something to a moment so that the person in front of the camera and the person behind are on exactly the same frequency and it all works to elevate a bit. Those were things I missed in the early days in that tiny studio but luckily, we were busy and there wasn’t much time to miss anything.

    Those early days are not what I will remember most about that space. It’s not the lighting problems, and it’s not the sound bleeding through the walls. It’s not the humidity, or computers shutting down in the control room because it was too hot. It was the fun times I had with an amazing group of extremely talented people. It’s Project B.E.A.S.T with Austin and Alex. It’s Abby doing bakling live, and Dan doing magic. It’s Burgle My Bananas, which I think really stretched what should be done in that space. It’s dragging out that racing wheel so Alex could truck. It’s Abby trying to get VR to work in a space that could hardly fit normal reality. It’s Alex doing drum marathons. It was a terrible space and we did terrible things to it, but it was ours and a part of me is going to miss it. The great news though, I realized as I was throwing away some bits and bobs as I was cleaning up, is that 90 percent of our time in that studio is recorded forever and available to relive whenever anybody wants. The other 10 percent is clearly secret and can obviously never be told. Thanks to everyone that was inside that studio at some point, and thanks to everyone who watched and listened to us broadcast from that studio. It was sometimes fun and it was sometimes frustrating, but it was always clearly memorable.

    I reached out to the rest of the amazing team that made that space great and here’s what they had to say:

    Alex Navarro
    I have several good-to-great memories of working in that cramped box CBS called a studio. To name a few: sitting on those awful bar stools as we played through the emotional beats of Life Is Strange, and the goofy-ass action of Until Dawn; getting absolutely blitzed during work hours with only the flimsiest of justifications (playing Jackbox with Mary Kish or watching Fast & Furious movies for "content"); playing a lot of video game drums for charity; nearly dying from Vinny not being able to remember the word "fireball". But if I'm honest, I think the prevailing memory of the studio, the one that will never leave me, is the last one I have. Specifically, the memory of that last day working out of that space last March, most of the way through a Def Jam: Fight for NY playthrough, of all things. I will remember Vinny's furrowed brow in the control room as emails began to come in, and me joking at the end of the stream that we'd be back in, like, November. I did not expect that joke to be optimistic in hindsight.

    I'm sad we didn't get to give that space a proper send-off. I'm sad we didn't get to come back and do one last Def Jam stream to tie off that hanging thread. I don't know if I'll miss the space, exactly, but I regret that we didn't get to walk out of there on our own terms. Goodbye, tiny studio. You were a space of our own, and more often than not, that was enough.

    Austin Walker
    As many hours as I spent in that office, my strongest memory of it remains my first one. I've told this story before, but during the application process for the gig at GB, I was living in exile up in Ontario. One week, I was headed to New York to talk at a conference on labor, the economy and stuff like that, and it struck me that I should probably just push on (then CBS Interactive) HR and say "Hey, I'll be in town, can I swing by the office for an interview?" HR cleared it with the team, and when it came time to come into the building, I was sort of thrown for a loop.

    GB to me had always been associated with comfortable (if dank-looking) basements, box-and-tchotchke filled office spaces, and ingenious but cramped studio setups. But the CBS Interactive office was corporate as hell. Fluorescent lights, glass walled offices, and rows and rows of cubes. And you know, lots of corporate sales people in suits. This was behind-the-scenes at Giant Bomb?

    But eventually I found the conference room where Vinny and Alex were, a space I don't think I ever went into after that day, and I immediately felt at ease. Not because they were unprofessional—both guys took the task seriously, asked me some tough questions, and drilled deep into whether I would be good for the gig—but because I could sense that whatever office space this team was put into, they'd bring their authenticity and personality would come with them. We hit it off immediately, and after some follow-up interviews with Jeff and some other CBS Interactive folks, we put ink to page and I moved back to New York.

    Within months, that office felt like a second home to me. Not because I was working super long hours or anything, but because even with the cramped studio, the fluorescent lights, and the guys in suits, making stuff with the crew at GB was like being with family. Corny, I know, but you don't get many excuses to be earnest these days, and I'm gonna take what I can get.

    Dan Ryckert
    It always cracked me up to leave a Film & 40s session at like 4pm and walk past a bunch of marketing people like I hadn’t just taken down two 40s of Olde E.

    Abby Russell
    I feel like there are going to be a lot of snarky remarks about our little studio from the rest of the crew, but I will always have a lot of fondness for my time in that space. Yes, the studio was small. Yes, the studio had awful soundproofing. Yes, the studio occasionally kinda smelled like chicken nuggets and feet. But most of the time the studio still felt like an oasis in what was mostly a dull office space. We were the weirdos who got to play games all day! I can only assume that for the rest of the office our studio was full of mYsTeRy. Or at the very least full of disruptive screaming and noise, for which I have no defense.

    One of the first things I did when I got my job at GB was organize the whole studio space. Of course, it eventually reverted back into being a huge mess again (but this time it was also MY mess), but organizing that space, decorating the shelves, choosing which bins and controller chargers to order gave me a sense of ownership of the space. I was a Giant Bomb employee! See those cubbies?? That was me!! Before 13 Deadly Sims and Six Crazy Frights, I had those shelves.

    And when my time at Giant Bomb came to a close, I was sad that I couldn't be in that stinky little studio playing games and having a few beers with everyone. I'm sad I couldn't help break down the space. The sentimental in me would have appreciated that time to say goodbye to the studio and also my time at Giant Bomb. Most of my fondest memories of my time at Giant Bomb were made in that stinky little box. But also, the realist in me is thankful I don't have to see how many of my hair ties were surely unearthed behind every piece of equipment and furniture.

    Jeff Bakalar
    You know, I'll miss that studio. And when I say "I'll miss that studio," what I'm really saying is I will absolutely not miss that studio. "But why?" you might ask. Well, aside from having to shift around all the garbage so I could have a seat for The Giant Beastcast each week, it turned out my chair was the only one that rotated.

    It also smelled very bad. I guess GBE was nose-deaf or something, but that place always smelled like B.O. and regret. There were a million light switches in there and none of them worked. You couldn't walk anywhere without tripping on a wire, snagging your clothing on splintered wood or knocking over a game console.

    It took years before we got comfortable chairs in there. Before that we had to sit on these horrific red plastic atrocities that made NJ Transit bus seats appear luxurious by comparison.

    I've meant everything I've said so far, and while I'm being honest, I also made countless memories in that little space and laughed harder there than I've ever laughed before. My best times at 28th Street were within that incredibly tiny coffin-- and, I've never told anyone this, but when the crew would go to San Francisco for GOTY, I'd sleep in there.

    I don't think we ever got a proper video "tour" of that studio, did we?

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    AistanAistan Tiny Bat Registered User regular
    For some reason the giant bomb newsletter keeps getting sent to my junk mail despite every time me saying it's not junk, so thanks for the reminder it was sent out.

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    NosfNosf Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Ex-Vlambeer co-founder and friend of the site Rami Ismail had an unfortunate meltdown on Twitter last night and has deleted his account.
    While I've personally gotten into a couple of arguments with Rami on similar topics I do think the platform is worse off without his voice and I hope he comes back.

    That said, I really disagree with him wrt to the point that drove him off Twitter and I'm glad Gita Jackson called him on his bullshit in this particular case.

    His Twitter is gone, and Vita's looks like it's private. A crumb of context?

    His twitter is back.

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    never dienever die Registered User regular
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    oh shit i'm way way behind on hotspot but this sounds like a required listen.

    is this the latest ep?

    Yeah, it’s the most recent episode. I was very amused when they talked about the difficulty of getting ads for the podcast until, after multiple GMs, one of the GMs got them contracted out to an ad agency (instead of using in house CBS marketing) and it immediately was hugely successful for them.

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    SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    Yeah the story about them needing to fight to reallocate sales budget for headcount simply due to the fact that CBS sales was useless to them resonated a lot with me. Been there, done that.

    I'd love to almost get a corporate presentation on how GB operates. I kind of always assumed Dave Nelasca was their sales guy across all things but that's clearly not the case.

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    agoajagoaj Top Tier One FearRegistered User regular
    Has Vinny or Jan done a "virtual studio" tour of how they manage combining the video streams now that everyones working from home?

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    CormacCormac Registered User regular
    Dave Nillasca will always be Dave in Alaska for me and I feel kind of bad about that.

    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
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    HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    Cormac wrote: »
    Dave Nillasca will always be Dave in Alaska for me and I feel kind of bad about that.

    don't worry, you're not alone in this

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    OptyOpty Registered User regular
    Jason A Striker vs Dave in Alaska

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    FuriousJodoFuriousJodo Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    agoaj wrote: »
    Has Vinny or Jan done a "virtual studio" tour of how they manage combining the video streams now that everyones working from home?

    I haven't seen anything like that, but from what I've gathered they are using Parsec to stream individually to whoever is hosting who is then tying all of the streams together somehow on the other end.

    FuriousJodo on Twitch/PSN/XBL/Whatever else
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    ManetherenWolfManetherenWolf Registered User regular
    I wanna say Jan mentioned something about potentially doing a video on that at some point.

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    SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    edited February 2021
    Hah, I love that we finally get an explanation of Jeff's fall from this video in the latest HotSpot.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2N3nTf5s_zo

    He basically fell onto some bean bags and crawled away to stay out of the camera shot.

    SteevL on
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    DiannaoChongDiannaoChong Registered User regular
    I liked the further mention of "hey that shot was actually really cool with the virtual screen and I have no idea why it never got used again"

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    HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    that fall still makes me laugh, even knowing it's now fake.

    also holy shit that was a great hotspot, thanks for the recommendation folks

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    Knight_Knight_ Dead Dead Dead Registered User regular
    it's funny because now that he's said it i do hear the beanbag

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    cooljammer00cooljammer00 Hey Small Christmas-Man!Registered User regular
    I thought everyone knew it was at least partially a bit, just not how much.

    Also there was that time he actually fell at a PAX and had a bruised tailbone for weeks.

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    SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    I thought everyone knew it was at least partially a bit, just not how much.

    Also there was that time he actually fell at a PAX and had a bruised tailbone for weeks.

    He mentions that right after talking about the fall from the above video. He said it actually hurt for about 2 years after that and he "probably should have seen a doctor". Yikes!

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    SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    Dan got a house



    Is that a central vacuum I see? I grew up with one of those and it was nice to have at the time. Probably a pain in the ass to maintain, though.

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    AistanAistan Tiny Bat Registered User regular
    And an oil heater.

    And well water.

    He's gonna have a fun time.

    Or he'll hire people to maintain it, have no problems whatsoever, then find gold in the walls.

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    OptyOpty Registered User regular
    That house screams "affordable because dealing with its amenities will be a pain in the ass" to me. I bet it has a septic tank too.

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    Undead ScottsmanUndead Scottsman Registered User regular
    While it sucks that GB lost so many people over the last year, the lineup for UPF of Jeff, Brad, Vinny, Alex, Jan and Jason is a pretty good one.

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    webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Aistan wrote: »
    And an oil heater.

    And well water.

    He's gonna have a fun time.

    Or he'll hire people to maintain it, have no problems whatsoever, then find gold in the walls.

    I don't think it's well water, Its just a softener system. All of that stuff, if designed into the house well it will be little effort to maintain. If it was shoehorned in though, woof!

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    NosfNosf Registered User regular
    That big of a softener suggests a well, seen that before when my parents moved out into the sticks. It's sort of a hassle, but not too bad. You just have to do a few things to maintain it, keep some big bags of salt (IIRC) pellets on hand. They had electric heat (which also sucks) and a fireplace.

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    RehabRehab Registered User regular
    Dan also prepared himself for home ownership recently by building one that he said was an exact replica of his real world home in Valheim.

    Which means that somewhere in his house he has a campfire and then a part of the roof open at an angle directly above it to let the smoke out.

    NNID: Rehab0
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    SyphonBlueSyphonBlue The studying beaver That beaver sure loves studying!Registered User regular
    Hopefully Dan has learned what a mortgage is

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    ManetherenWolfManetherenWolf Registered User regular
    Well his first act of home ownership was decorating the fireplace mantle with a Waluigi Amiibo.

    Never change Dan. Never change.

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    HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    I wonder what contest he won a house in

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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    I wonder what contest he won a house in

    Morton Salt. For being their biggest customer.

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    KelorKelor Registered User regular
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6ndc6SSENU

    Thought people might enjoy this.

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    Undead ScottsmanUndead Scottsman Registered User regular


    Of course Dan would eventually turn his twitch stuff into a talkshow. Of course he would.

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    SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular


    Of course Dan would eventually turn his twitch stuff into a talkshow. Of course he would.

    She's right about it being the best Gitaroo Man song too!

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    Houk the NamebringerHouk the Namebringer Nipples The EchidnaRegistered User regular
    If you held a gun to my head I don't think I could pick a favorite Gitaroo Man song. Every song pretty much falls into either "I don't really like or care about this song at all" or "this is the best song in the game, along with all these other ones" and I really can't rank them any more precisely than that.

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    GlalGlal AiredaleRegistered User regular
    Flyin' to Your Heart and Legendary Theme are both... *chef kiss*

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    Houk the NamebringerHouk the Namebringer Nipples The EchidnaRegistered User regular
    Flyin' to Your Heart, Legendary Theme (all versions), and Born to Be Bone, are all top-tier, with Resurrection coming in just barely beneath them.

    Bee Jam Blues is right in the middle. Everything else is fine but not crucial.

This discussion has been closed.