Star Trek: Give Us Sexy Dolphins Now!!

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  • BizazedoBizazedo Registered User regular
    edited May 22
    For some reason (I HATE MYSELF?), I decided to re-watch TNG season 1. I've done a re-watch of it all a few years ago, but the first season is missing from my memory. I may have skipped it? I dunno.

    It's not good thus far (up to episode 8 or 9) and the music is used horribly / oddly at times. It builds or cues...oddly. I love Picard being a dick at times, but it's still not good. Chief Engineer Argyle was terrible.

    Episode 7 made me howl in amusement, though, because it ends with Picard under the control of an alien who convinces him it's a good idea to explore the galaxy as an energy being. He uses the transporter to make himself into energy and dumps himself into an energy cloud.

    The merger doesn't work, they somehow get him back and use the transporter to reconstitute himself....and he doesn't remember anything that happened after he transported into the cloud and is confused. TROI says the transporter rebuilt him from a version before he went into the cloud....

    Confirming to me that transporters are murder.

    Of course, Doctor McCoy was on a previous episode insinuating the same thing, but still. I smirked all through the credits.

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  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Picard in Farpoint is trying to invoke the wonder he's feeling at this new starship and his excitement to explore the galaxy but then "Shut off that damn noise!" and he sounds so ornery. It's funny.

    That said, "If we're going to be damned, let's be damned for who we are" is a great line and the kind of sentiment worthy of a Star Trek Captain.

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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    eEK! wrote: »
    Guess its up to me to defend Voyager (what did I do to deserve this...).

    Yes its got a bunch of problems, but its also not afraid to be Star Trek and to ask the kind of pretentious questions that Star Trek should ask, sometimes that means they end up doing an episode where the Pilot and the Captain transform into Salamanders, but it also means they've got a fantastic episodes about the allocation of resources in American Healthcare and several great episodes about whether a computer programs simulated ego-mania can cause it to gain sentience (Yes, these are all Doctor episodes.. but still...).
    That was a horrible episode. No, no, just horrible. It's meant to be a public vs. private healthcare debate, but it fails on every possible level.

    First of all, the alien healthcare system is not the US system. Their triage system prioritizes individuals who are expected to make contributions to society. That may be offensive to those of us (and to the Doctor) who value a triage system based on medical need, but it's a defensible position (which the episode never actually bothers to defend). It is also considerably better than the US system, which is just giving healthcare to rich people and screwing over the poor and middle class. (Sure, their healthcare system is predicated on a system to measure individual contributions to society, but this is Star Trek, insane impossible technologies are a dime a dozen.)

    Second, the alien healthcare system is setup this way because they do not have the resources to treat everyone. And that's a real problem, that's affecting real public healthcare systems here on Earth in the present. And this major question is... ignored right after it's brought up and never considered again. In fact the Doctor, by forcing them to switch to a needs-based triage without resolving the underlying resource issue, has pretty much screwed over that society.

    And third, the issue is resolved... by the Doctor basically torturing the administrator until he agrees to change the system. What a brilliant victory for public healthcare! The best argument the Voyager writers can come up with for "you should heal the sick" is "if you don't we'll torture you."

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  • CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    I'm sorry what, were you asleep during part of the episode? The conflict was between the magic medicine being used to save the kid's life and being used preventatively to possibly extend the lives of the elites that their special computer (built by the elites!) said were more important. The scarcity is artificial, just like in real life, because the people in charge are evil, just like in real life. Intentionally poisoning the guy wasn't great, but working within the system the system was never going to work because the elites completely control the system. Whether that's true in real life as well I'll leave up to you.

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  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    I don't think the episode explicitly said it, but for some reason I was pretty sure the venn diagram of "important for our society" and "wealthy and powerful" was not quite the circle that planet hoped it was.

    Pity, because that could be a good argument if used correctly.

  • CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    I don't think the episode explicitly said it, but for some reason I was pretty sure the venn diagram of "important for our society" and "wealthy and powerful" was not quite the circle that planet hoped it was.

    Pity, because that could be a good argument if used correctly.
    Now that I think about it you're right the example wasn't some rich slob, but meritocracy is a fake idea so it still works.

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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Coinage wrote: »
    I'm sorry what, were you asleep during part of the episode? The conflict was between the magic medicine being used to save the kid's life and being used preventatively to possibly extend the lives of the elites that their special computer (built by the elites!) said were more important. The scarcity is artificial, just like in real life, because the people in charge are evil, just like in real life. Intentionally poisoning the guy wasn't great, but working within the system the system was never going to work because the elites completely control the system. Whether that's true in real life as well I'll leave up to you.

    You're the one who's been watching the episode with your eyes closed.

    The scarcity was real, it was even in the very example you just cited: the sick kid didn't get medicine because the other kid whose life they extended got it instead. That's scarcity right there. There's not enough medicine to administer to both of them, and choices need to be made.

    Just like in real life! I don't know how you can argue that medical resource scarcity is not a real thing today, while Trump's idiocy is causing a shortage of a life-saving drug for people who really need it right as we fucking speak.

    Also, there were no "elites" in the episode. I mean, obviously there are elites somewhere on the planet, but they were not in the episode. There was only the Doctor, the Administrator, the sick kid, and for one scene the kid whose life was extended. And he was pick by merit, not by elitism. Which brings me to:
    Coinage wrote: »
    Now that I think about it you're right the example wasn't some rich slob, but meritocracy is a fake idea so it still works.

    So is FTL, space aliens, and medical holograms. "This piece of Star Trek technology is fake" is a bullshit cop-out. Just because it doesn't exist in reality doesn't mean you get to ignore its importance on the story and sub in your own prejudices.

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  • CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    The scarcity was real, it was even in the very example you just cited: the sick kid didn't get medicine because the other kid whose life they extended got it instead. That's scarcity right there. There's not enough medicine to administer to both of them, and choices need to be made.
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    You're believing the propaganda used to maintain the status quo in a fictional story!
    So is FTL, space aliens, and medical holograms. "This piece of Star Trek technology is fake" is a bullshit cop-out. Just because it doesn't exist in reality doesn't mean you get to ignore its importance on the story and sub in your own prejudices.
    Yes, I believe the system that classifies someone born into mining as having less "potential" is wrong, and there can never be a system accurately classifying "potential value" with any technology imaginable unless it's some sort of time travel eugenics. If that's prejudice than I guess all I can say is okay liberal.

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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Coinage wrote: »
    The scarcity was real, it was even in the very example you just cited: the sick kid didn't get medicine because the other kid whose life they extended got it instead. That's scarcity right there. There's not enough medicine to administer to both of them, and choices need to be made.
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    You're believing the propaganda used to maintain the status quo in a fictional story!
    I don't know where the hell you got this, but it's not in the episode. And also, it's still scarcity. There's not enough resources to give everyone everything they need, so they allocate based on some algorithm. You just shot your own argument down.
    So is FTL, space aliens, and medical holograms. "This piece of Star Trek technology is fake" is a bullshit cop-out. Just because it doesn't exist in reality doesn't mean you get to ignore its importance on the story and sub in your own prejudices.
    Yes, I believe the system that classifies someone born into mining as having less "potential" is wrong, and there can never be a system accurately classifying "potential value" with any technology imaginable unless it's some sort of time travel eugenics. If that's prejudice than I guess all I can say is okay liberal.
    Yes, there will never be a perfect and completely objective meritocracy software in the real world. There will also never be space aliens and FTL travel in the real world. If you want a discussion limited to things that can exist in the real world, what the fuck are you doing in a Star Trek thread?

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  • CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    edited May 22
    Oh my god go to 24:10 on Netflix of S7E5: Critical Care are you fucking kidding me? And the obvious implication is that they (as a society) could give more but choose not to. Just like we as a society could have medical care for everyone, but choose not to. Yes, the current situation has challenges, I don't mean tomorrow. Besides that potentially extending the life of an engineer (who is definitely replacable!) and saving the actual life of a child is not an actual choice.
    here will also never be space aliens and FTL travel in the real world. If you want a discussion limited to things that can exist in the real world, what the fuck are you doing in a Star Trek thread?
    It's not possible because human life has intrinsic value and eugenics is wrong you absurdly silly goose. Maybe if you think eugenics is okay and the only problem was it being done wrong I should ask what the fuck are you doing in a Star Trek thread?

    If it seems like I'm getting too heated, it's because what you're saying is why people are dying in real life.

    Coinage on
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  • MancingtomMancingtom Registered User regular
    Oh my God! A new thread argument. I'm so excited!

    Access to healthcare should be determined by one's Star Wars opinions. Those who are Incorrect are summarily executed, their identities erased from pubic knowledge. This feels about as logical and humane as what exists now, with the added bonus of eliminating society's true undesirables. No downsides!

    Richy
  • CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    I'm willing to die to complain that The Last Jedi was not terrible but pretty sub-par because I have principles

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  • BizazedoBizazedo Registered User regular
    Mancingtom wrote: »
    Oh my God! A new thread argument. I'm so excited!

    Access to healthcare should be determined by one's Star Wars opinions. Those who are Incorrect are summarily executed, their identities erased from pubic knowledge. This feels about as logical and humane as what exists now, with the added bonus of eliminating society's true undesirables. No downsides!

    Unneeded. Not only do transporters murder, the new clones are also subtly changed in their brain chemistry to make them zealots who believe in the Federation. That's why simple citizens, like the Maquis, and the few Federation officers who realize the situation, try to rebel.

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  • MancingtomMancingtom Registered User regular
    Bizazedo wrote: »
    Mancingtom wrote: »
    Oh my God! A new thread argument. I'm so excited!

    Access to healthcare should be determined by one's Star Wars opinions. Those who are Incorrect are summarily executed, their identities erased from pubic knowledge. This feels about as logical and humane as what exists now, with the added bonus of eliminating society's true undesirables. No downsides!

    Unneeded. Not only do transporters murder, the new clones are also subtly changed in their brain chemistry to make them zealots who believe in the Federation. That's why simple citizens, like the Maquis, and the few Federation officers who realize the situation, try to rebel.

    Genius like that is why, if you were in a horror movie, you'd be the Final Girl.

    Bizazedo
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Coinage wrote: »
    Oh my god go to 24:10 on Netflix of S7E5: Critical Care are you fucking kidding me? And the obvious implication is that they (as a society) could give more but choose not to. Just like we as a society could have medical care for everyone, but choose not to. Yes, the current situation has challenges, I don't mean tomorrow. Besides that potentially extending the life of an engineer (who is definitely replacable!) and saving the actual life of a child is not an actual choice.
    here will also never be space aliens and FTL travel in the real world. If you want a discussion limited to things that can exist in the real world, what the fuck are you doing in a Star Trek thread?
    It's not possible because human life has intrinsic value and eugenics is wrong you absurdly silly goose. Maybe if you think eugenics is okay and the only problem was it being done wrong I should ask what the fuck are you doing in a Star Trek thread?

    If it seems like I'm getting too heated, it's because what you're saying is why people are dying in real life.
    We as a society cannot give complete medical care for everyone. We don't have enough doctors, specialists, nurses, medication, diagnosis machines, hospital beds, etc. etc. This is not a US-healthcare problem. The fully-public healthcare of Canada also cannot provide everything for everyone. Neither can the mix-model European healthcare system. There just isn't enough of these resources available for everyone to get everything they need. Now I'll take a moment and let you think, and guess what we call this situation where a resource is too scarce to fill the needs. Hint: the bolded word will help you.

    Now sure, we could get more of all the things I listed, but we'd need to pay for them in one of three ways: either we cut how much we spend on non-healthcare things like education, infrastructure, defense, etc., or we raise taxes, or we go into (even more) deficit and pass on the debt to the next generations. We as a society decided we don't want to do that. Not because we don't value human life, but because we value other things as well, and thus need to balance multiple priorities. We could give more healthcare services to everyone, but we don't want to do it if it means we can no longer educate our children, or help those in need in our society, or advance scientific research, or defend our borders, or dozens of other things.

    Are you still with me? Good.

    Now, given that we have limited medical resources, we need to decide who gets them. This is called triage. It's actually the first step in every and all healthcare systems that have ever existed in human history around the world, and will continue to be so until we somehow become a post-scarcity society. One way to do triage is to allocate based on medical need, within the constraints of what is available. It has many benefits, but the most important one I think is fairness, which is something most of us value in society (today -- this was not always the case!). As a result we consider this a very good way to do triage.

    But.... and this is the part that will blow you mind, so hang on. You may want to take a deep breath before reading on.

    It's not the only way to do triage. Other ways exist, and they have benefits and limitations, just like medical-need-based has benefits and limitations. Welcome to the real world. It's messy and complicated and full of trade-offs.

    This is what this Voyager wanted to be about. Needs-based triage vs the US profit-based triage.

    My point, from my original post, is that it fails miserably at that. First of all, because the alien system is not profit-based, it's merit-based, which makes it completely different from the US system. Second, because they never actually contrast and debate the merits of each system. And third, because the argument is ultimately "won" by the Doctor literally torturing the Administrator into submission. If the only argument you can make for your healthcare system is "I'll torture you if you disagree with me", you're not making a very strong or convincing argument (except towards the person you're torturing).

    Think about it. What's going to happen the day after the Doctor leaves and the Administrator tries to change the system? The hospital and society are still bound by scarce resources, they didn't solve (or even address) that problem. And the Administrator does have superiors to answer to, that's stated explicitly in the episode. So what happens when his superiors call him up and ask why his resource allocations changed all the sudden? He can't argue for his way being better, because it has never been shown (in the episode) to be better. He can argue he's been tortured into doing this, but since the torturer has left that's not much of a strong point going forward, and in fact an argument for turning back to the old way of doing things. Or he can torture his superiors into accepting his way of doing things, and create healthcare reform through a regime of punishment and fear. None of those are really good outcomes.

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  • CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    No we definitely don't spend more on healthcare because we don't value human life. Or at the very least some people don't value some lives. I hope you're sitting down but I don't believe Canada is the best we can do.

    And again, I don't know how to make it any clearer the episode believes the "merit" is obviously class based. The low priority queue is dirty and and dark and cramped and everyone has ragged clothes. The high priority queue is bright and spacious and everyone has nice clothes. If the episode was actually about an even remotely objective merit system the conflict would be between the head engineer and like a moderately popular musician. Not the head engineer and a miner who wants to be a doctor. And the "trade-off" wouldn't be so cartoonishly evil.

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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Coinage wrote: »
    No we definitely don't spend more on healthcare because we don't value human life. Or at the very least some people don't value some lives. I hope you're sitting down but I don't believe Canada is the best we can do.

    And again, I don't know how to make it any clearer the episode believes the "merit" is obviously class based. The low priority queue is dirty and and dark and cramped and everyone has ragged clothes. The high priority queue is bright and spacious and everyone has nice clothes. If the episode was actually about an even remotely objective merit system the conflict would be between the head engineer and like a moderately popular musician. Not the head engineer and a miner who wants to be a doctor. And the "trade-off" wouldn't be so cartoonishly evil.

    I never said the Canadian healthcare system was the best we could do. I also never said their system wasn't flawed. I'm starting to realize that you're paying as much attention to my posts as you did to the episode we're arguing about.

    Again, from the top: in a resource-scarcity setting, such as the real world or the fictional world the episode is set in, priorities must be set for resource allocation, including healthcare resources. We can triage patients and allocate resources in one of several different manners, such as by medical need, by wealth and profit, or by merit using a fictional alien merit-assignment algorithm developed on a fictional alien planet we reached using a fictional FTL drive (I don't know if I'm getting through to you how fictional this scenario is). Every system has pros and cons, and none of them is inherently evil or predicated on devaluating human life.

    The above paragraph already contains more depth of analysis of healthcare systems than the Voyager episode we are debating. And this is the crux of my complaint. It sets up a real problem (medical resource scarcity) and two conflicting solutions (allocation on need or merit), then drops the problem completely and fails to compare and debate the solutions, and finally solves the issue with the "good" guy torturing the "bad" guy. If this is what you consider either a good episode or a good argument for medical-need-based healthcare triage, I don't know what to tell you.

    Though I guess I shouldn't tell you anything and just torture you until you agree with me it's a crappy episode.

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  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Ah, arguing the minutiae of scripts as relating to real-world ethics applied to the Star Trek setting.

    Truly, this is Classic Internet Star Trek.

    Okay, who is going to quote something from another episode to prove or disprove a point, including a timestamp for the quote and two mistakes that were made filming the scene?

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  • Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion A fixed point in space and timeRegistered User regular
    I mean, it's D&D. It's kind of what we signed up for.

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  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Oh, I'm not complaining. I find it... comforting, I suppose.

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  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    "Trek. Trek never changes."

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  • TubularLuggageTubularLuggage Registered User regular
    Wow, analysis of a 20~ year old critique of the American healthcare system sure got out of hand.
    Guys, the episode just wanted to state that healthcare should be universal, and not prioritized for the wealthy.
    Healthcare should be universal, not decided by capitalism. Boom. (It didn't do this perfectly, but that was the intended message).

    Also, while the Canadian healthcare system is far from perfect, (there are a lot of things we still need to change, and some countries are well ahead of us on this), it absolutely is possible to provide adequate healthcare to every person, if we remove the profit incentive, and treat healthcare as a service rather than a for profit thing.

  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    I'm not going to argue the minutiae of a Voyager episode because they were usually pretty terrible at making good points, unfortunately. But I do enjoy reading a good Star Trek fight, not gonna lie.

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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Wow, analysis of a 20~ year old critique of the American healthcare system sure got out of hand.
    Guys, the episode just wanted to state that healthcare should be universal, and not prioritized for the wealthy.
    Healthcare should be universal, not decided by capitalism. Boom. (It didn't do this perfectly, but that was the intended message).

    Also, while the Canadian healthcare system is far from perfect, (there are a lot of things we still need to change, and some countries are well ahead of us on this), it absolutely is possible to provide adequate healthcare to every person, if we remove the profit incentive, and treat healthcare as a service rather than a for profit thing.

    For a definition of adequate.

    Richy
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Wow, analysis of a 20~ year old critique of the American healthcare system sure got out of hand.
    Guys, the episode just wanted to state that healthcare should be universal, and not prioritized for the wealthy.
    Healthcare should be universal, not decided by capitalism. Boom. (It didn't do this perfectly, but that was the intended message).

    That's what I hate about the episode. It's a good message that I agree wholeheartedly with. But they defend it, not with facts proving universal healthcare is better, not with an appeal to emotion for the sick, not with a Picard speech or a technobabble solution or destroying an alien god, but by torturing people against universal healthcare into submission. And I for one don't want to be on the pro-torture side. So this episode is pushing me in the anti-universal-healthcare camp against my will and against every humane fiber in my body.

    "People have a right not to be sick" is the easiest, most straightforward high ground to claim and defend. 20 years on and it still blows my mind that Voyager failed so miserably to claim and defend it that they ended up making an argument against it.

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  • eEK!eEK! Registered User regular
    edited May 23
    Richy wrote: »
    Wow, analysis of a 20~ year old critique of the American healthcare system sure got out of hand.
    Guys, the episode just wanted to state that healthcare should be universal, and not prioritized for the wealthy.
    Healthcare should be universal, not decided by capitalism. Boom. (It didn't do this perfectly, but that was the intended message).

    That's what I hate about the episode. It's a good message that I agree wholeheartedly with. But they defend it, not with facts proving universal healthcare is better, not with an appeal to emotion for the sick, not with a Picard speech or a technobabble solution or destroying an alien god, but by torturing people against universal healthcare into submission. And I for one don't want to be on the pro-torture side. So this episode is pushing me in the anti-universal-healthcare camp against my will and against every humane fiber in my body.

    "People have a right not to be sick" is the easiest, most straightforward high ground to claim and defend. 20 years on and it still blows my mind that Voyager failed so miserably to claim and defend it that they ended up making an argument against it.

    Well this is odd, I figured that episode would only be critiqued as too preachy or on the nose, but I'll see if I argue against your criticisms anyway.

    So... on the idea that it doesn't represent the American system, as this system claims to be meritocratic. The episode takes at face value the argument that the American system of resource allocation is merit based, with money being the primary indicator of merit and runs with it to create an exaggerated example that doesn't use money as an indicator of merit, which is still horrific.

    On the the doctor infecting and reclassifying the administrator, thinking on this again I can see how you'd interpret that as the administrator being tortured into changing his position, as that's literally what happens (always a bad point to concede), but I've always watched Star Trek as a morality play (not sure how it can be watched as anything else) and from that perspective its obvious that the administrator is receiving a taste of his own medicine and the story makes it clear that he deserves it, by having him kill a child to prove his point. Further the administrators capitulation isn't just necessary for the doctor's plan, it also demonstrates to the audience that he wasn't willing to accept the judgement of his system, when he was the victim of it.
    Normally in a morality play it would be random chance or divine intervention that punish the villain, so this is an immoral act from the doctor, but they include that in the story as well, by making the doctor check his ethics routines [edited in the end of this bit, cos I forgot it].

    More broadly on the facts vs. emotions aspect of the argument, the facts have been settled for decades and its only the emotional argument that continues.

    Finally on the planet having a real resource shortage and the administrator's system being an improvement on their previous situation, the doctor says out loud in the episode, that its not good enough to say 'things are better than they were' when they can be better still for everyone.

    Final Finally (this is video game forum after all) just to ignorantly dunk on the new treks, the lack of discussions like this is why I've not bothered watching the new series, I'm sure there's a lot to like about them, but the focus on character and action isn't what I'm looking for and I'd rather they asked the questions of the day like 'why does God need a star ship???'

    eEK! on
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  • HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Are you still with me? Good....

    But.... and this is the part that will blow you mind, so hang on. You may want to take a deep breath before reading on....

    Think about it....

    fyi this is not a effective way of making an argument

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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    Are you still with me? Good....

    But.... and this is the part that will blow you mind, so hang on. You may want to take a deep breath before reading on....

    Think about it....

    fyi this is not a effective way of making an argument

    Yeah, I was getting annoyed at that point. I shouldn't have talked that way. It was very un-utopian-better-human of me.

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  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    edited May 23
  • autono-wally, erotibot300autono-wally, erotibot300 love machine Registered User regular
    God that was such a good finale

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  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    God that was such a good finale

    Still hands down the best Trek Finale

    Close second to "Second star to the right and straight on til morning".

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  • KupiKupi Registered User regular
    God that was such a good finale

    Still hands down the best Trek Finale

    Close second to "Second star to the right and straight on til morning".

    I was always more interested in video games than television as a kid, so I found Star Trek something of an nuisance (it was my mother's favorite show at the time, and she could obviously pull rank on use of the TV), so this is the first time I'm noticing that Riker is holding damn near every chip on that table. :lol:

    My favorite musical instrument is the air-raid siren.
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  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Nobody ever seems to learn that yes, Riker is bluffing.

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  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    "Four hands in a row. How does he do it?"
    "I cheat."
    "..."
    "I'm kidding!"

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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Kupi wrote: »
    God that was such a good finale

    Still hands down the best Trek Finale

    Close second to "Second star to the right and straight on til morning".

    I was always more interested in video games than television as a kid, so I found Star Trek something of an nuisance (it was my mother's favorite show at the time, and she could obviously pull rank on use of the TV), so this is the first time I'm noticing that Riker is holding damn near every chip on that table. :lol:

    Damn I had never realized that. That is hilarious :lol:

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    shryke
  • Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    That's part of what makes the scene where he plays a hand against his transporter clone so rad.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Kupi wrote: »
    God that was such a good finale

    Still hands down the best Trek Finale

    Close second to "Second star to the right and straight on til morning".

    I was always more interested in video games than television as a kid, so I found Star Trek something of an nuisance (it was my mother's favorite show at the time, and she could obviously pull rank on use of the TV), so this is the first time I'm noticing that Riker is holding damn near every chip on that table. :lol:

    Damn I had never realized that. That is hilarious :lol:

    They're on set getting the final scene done, everyone is trying not to cry, Frakes is sliding other actor's chips over to his side for the final dolly shot. No one notices till post.

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  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    For real?!

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    Steam, Warframe: Megajoule
  • Zilla360Zilla360 21st Century. |She/Her| Surreal. Immersive. Earth.Registered User regular
    Re-watching Datalore from S1 of TNG the other day and I'd forgotten how horny Riker was. First question he asks Data about Lore before he gets rebuilt is whether or not he comes 'fully equipped'.

    Kind of implying that Riker really wants to see if he can fuck a robot. :lol:

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  • AuralynxAuralynx Darkness is a perspective Watching the ego workRegistered User regular
    Zilla360 wrote: »
    Re-watching Datalore from S1 of TNG the other day and I'd forgotten how horny Riker was. First question he asks Data about Lore before he gets rebuilt is whether or not he comes 'fully equipped'.

    Kind of implying that Riker really wants to see if he can fuck a robot. :lol:

    I've brought this up before but early-seasons Riker comes off like a real jerk on re-watch, contrary to how I remembered him!

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    Zilla360chrono_travellerNightslyr
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