I need to apply for a job wtf do [resume] help

ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morningAnd the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
I just saw an ad for an administrative assistant and like I really want the job, it pays well and I think it would be a good fit except the person looking knows me a little and so my resume really needs to blow them away.

All my administrative experience is from a solid minimum of 15 years ago and the only resumes I've written recently have been for biology degree-related stuff

Is there a good template? Should I not use a template? Do I need a cover letter? What is a cover letter really

And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn

Posts

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    edited January 30
    If they don't ask for a cover letter, don't send one.

    Templates are a place to start, but often they follow old resume formats. Pull out the key words from the job and make sure they are included in the resume. If you have a 4 year degree and 15 years experience you can go to 1.5 pages. Leave out the objective statement.

    I'm leaving work right now, I'll muck about later to find a template I like for an admin.

    Edit:
    Because your work history is a bit shakey I think for you we do a functional resume. It’s more about the skills you bring to the table.

    I would take something like this:
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/cf/49/e6/cf49e67207c68645bcd7ef38794f5f95.gif

    Remove the objective statement and tailor it to the job you are applying for. Keywords are crucial to get passed any automated guard dogs.

    zepherin on
    ceres
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited January 31
    If your resume gets past the HR filter-droids, you'll kill it in an interview. Action words and say "time management" at least once.

    dispatch.o on
    ceresnever die
  • Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    use the job description as a guideline for writing your resume; every point on 'duties' or 'essential requirements' or whatever should find an 'answer' in your resume, even if the application isn't directly related

    try to re-use their own wording/keywords as much as possible; this will help you get past machine sorting and even at the human evaluation stage, using wording they came up with tends to make you seem like a better 'fit'

    imo only submit a cover letter if they specifically ask for one, although there's some disagreement about this I think

    NREqxl5.jpg
    zepherinEnc
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    If you know the person who posted the job, can you mention the fact in your cover letter? Or even contact them privately so you can get through the robofilters.

    Thro
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    Theres a very easy and specific pattern to follow when writing resumes. Essentially each bullet point can be boiled down to what you did, why you did it, and what you accomplished by doing it. Think of any big or specific accomplishments then fit them to this template. Make it a mix of specific actions/accomplishments and general skills and aptitudes. Having specifics on the resume is the hook that hiring managers and future bosses look for because it gives them something to ask about in the interview and let's them know you are better than other candidates.

    If I have a job posting that lists X Y and Z duties/skills and I get a resume that just says the candidate is skilled at X Y and Z without specific instances, I'm going to think they aren't actually skilled at X Y and Z, or are so uncreative that I don't want them anyways (at least in my line of work that requires problem solving and critical thinking beyond those skills).

    Think of it like all good stories, it's better to show than to tell.

    Super generic examples:
    Flagged design flaw early in in production of Widget V that allowed the company to retool and saved $xxx on warranty claims

    Managed large scale project Y to Z for client, and finished $yyy under budget

    Forged relationships with multiple stakeholders at client firms for repeat business and grew sales revenue by z% year over year. (sales oriented)

    Specific example from my own resume -
    Create and implement new workflows for large structured data case that involved 18 separate proprietary database collections, including a 6TB pharma adverse events database, and train client attorneys and review team on these unique formats and workflows
    (I realize that's mostly gibberish to anyone outside my industry, but it's an example of a specific project that piques curiosity but also shows skills).

  • SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    If they don't ask for a cover letter, don't send one.

    That's gonna be a hard disagree from me. I started getting more interviews when I started being diligent about cover letters. Unless you are specifically instructed not to send a cover letter, it's better to send one.

    mts wrote: »
    heres how i see it being a total win situation for you
    1. stay with your wife while she dog sits. this wins husband points since she knows its out of your comfort zone
    2. have sex all over her friends house so that the next time you see her friend look at you condescendingly, you can wink back knowing you did the freaky deaky where she eats her cheerios.
    KetBraEncCelestialBadgerSatanIsMyMotorMulysaSemproniusSixPsykoma
  • KetBraKetBra Dressed Ridiculously Registered User regular
    Always send a cover letter.

    KGMvDLc.jpg?1
    EncCelestialBadgerMulysaSemproniusRichy
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Job Duties include:
    - Outbound calls to existing clients
    - Account management
    - Administrative duties

    Aside from some info about location and benefits... that's it.

    The first one I did a ton of while working at a veterinarian's office. The third I did when I worked as a security guard (for a few years) and then after that for a temp agency, where I mostly took short-term jobs.

    I'm not sure I have too much experience with account management since I'm not entirely sure what that entails but I have managed cell cultures, even many of them at a time. Now between their personalities and the naming convention that's probably saying something, but I doubt it means much to someone who wants someone who can type.

    Generally speaking I find the list frustratingly vague, and the wrinkle here is I did confirm the last name and the person who sent the info to the community is my son's best friend's dad. Now, my son and his best friend have a... complicated relationship that none of us are entirely sure what to do with, and also I'm pretty sure his dad makes about our annual income in a month or so and being around them makes me... nervous. They wanted to be closer to where their kids' friends are so they just went ahead and bought a fairly expensive house there... and then didn't sell the old one and when I had to figure out how to get to that one I got lost because looking at google maps I thought it was a shopping center.

    They have a basketball court in their yard. Not a net, a court. A real one. And a pool. It's the SAME YARD. And it's 20 minutes away from the house they just bought that they only stay at on weekends I can't even imagine.

    So, best case scenario, I don't have the interview with him because it would be a lot harder to get through because being around him makes me sweat.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    zepherinBrody
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    I'd be happy to do a look-over critique if you want to PM me the job description and your resume.

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    If you know the guy who is hiring outside of work and hang out with him occasionally as parent friends, why not contact him directly? That's networking.

    Would it make you feel really awkward working for this guy? Like, if it didn't work out it'd make it difficult for your kid to carry on being friends with his kid?

    LaOsThro
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    If you know the guy who is hiring outside of work and hang out with him occasionally as parent friends, why not contact him directly? That's networking.

    Would it make you feel really awkward working for this guy? Like, if it didn't work out it'd make it difficult for your kid to carry on being friends with his kid?

    More like, if I blow the interview, or maybe even submit a resume. I've been around rich people before, I don't really give a crap most of the time, and they seem perfectly nice and all, but the combination of the fact that I worry an interview where I look ridiculous (which is entirely possible because I have a hard time looking professional in general and I worry that even though he seems perfectly nice, knowing that... yeah) and my usual worry that he gets kicked out of their house for doing something he shouldn't with their furniture and then they won't be able to really play...

    I'm almost certainly getting in my own way and worked up over nothing, but... anyway. I should probably shut up about that and try to do my best with this resume anyway.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    zepherin
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