Helping You Build A Better [Home Network]

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  • Blameless ClericBlameless Cleric An angel made of sapphires each more flawlessly cut than the last Registered User regular
    edited September 26
    Ok that sounds amazing. Our house is made of a lot of seemingly random materials (some walls kinda.. smoosh? if you press on them, some are brick. Various pieces of it have been here in some form since ~1841) and I think I may be able to convince everyone to shell out that much!! If there is a lower tier option I would love to know about it if only so I can present it as context for taking the better one haha

    Ah also I’m sorry to ask for more work but I’m looking at Eero stuff and I’m not sure which thing to suggest we get, the beacons or the like boxes? Or both? Hm. Looking at your map (BEAUTIFUL thank u) I think it would be 2 regular box ones + 2 beacons (maybe 3 if that back room doesn’t get stuff)?

    Blameless Cleric on
    Orphane wrote: »

    one flower ring to rule them all and in the sunlightness bind them

    I'd love it if you took a look at my art and my PATREON!
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Nah, no beacons. Go with the $250 three pack here and a single additional here . If you set everything up and find out you need one more stand alone unit, get it then. Try without it though. Setup is dead easy, it's all app based so it will walk you through the process.

    Disclaimer: the links go to best buy. I work for them, but I'm a field work grunt and ultimately don't care where you buy them. If you find a better price, please take it.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    IoloBlameless Cleric
  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    Hey all, I just set up a wireless mesh network (Netgear Nighthawk) and it's been working really well and we now have solid signal everywhere in the house (lath and plaster in our old home created a lot of dead zones), but that's not the reason I'm here. My old router (Archer C7) had a USB print server which was great for connecting my non-networked laser printer into the network and allow any (Windows) device to print to it. I'd love to be able to move the printer into the closet of my office, which has an electrical outlet and some shelf space, in order to clear some space on my desk since the printer doesn't get used all that often.

    Is it possible to set up that old router as a wireless print server (connection chain: Printer--usb-->old router--wireless b/g/n-->mesh router-->all networked devices) or do I need to purchase some kind of wireless print server dongle which seems to run ~$60-100?

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    edited September 28
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Hey all, I just set up a wireless mesh network (Netgear Nighthawk) and it's been working really well and we now have solid signal everywhere in the house (lath and plaster in our old home created a lot of dead zones), but that's not the reason I'm here. My old router (Archer C7) had a USB print server which was great for connecting my non-networked laser printer into the network and allow any (Windows) device to print to it. I'd love to be able to move the printer into the closet of my office, which has an electrical outlet and some shelf space, in order to clear some space on my desk since the printer doesn't get used all that often.

    Is it possible to set up that old router as a wireless print server (connection chain: Printer--usb-->old router--wireless b/g/n-->mesh router-->all networked devices) or do I need to purchase some kind of wireless print server dongle which seems to run ~$60-100?

    This is a little dated but should work.

    https://www.tp-link.com/us/support/faq/415/

    Edit: looking into this again, it may not work without an attached computer.

    Another option would be something like a RaspberryPi connected to the printer and acting like the server.

    Mugsley on
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    edited October 5
    Mugsley wrote: »
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Hey all, I just set up a wireless mesh network (Netgear Nighthawk) and it's been working really well and we now have solid signal everywhere in the house (lath and plaster in our old home created a lot of dead zones), but that's not the reason I'm here. My old router (Archer C7) had a USB print server which was great for connecting my non-networked laser printer into the network and allow any (Windows) device to print to it. I'd love to be able to move the printer into the closet of my office, which has an electrical outlet and some shelf space, in order to clear some space on my desk since the printer doesn't get used all that often.

    Is it possible to set up that old router as a wireless print server (connection chain: Printer--usb-->old router--wireless b/g/n-->mesh router-->all networked devices) or do I need to purchase some kind of wireless print server dongle which seems to run ~$60-100?

    This is a little dated but should work.

    https://www.tp-link.com/us/support/faq/415/

    Edit: looking into this again, it may not work without an attached computer.

    Another option would be something like a RaspberryPi connected to the printer and acting like the server.

    So, there may be an issue here, but not the one most people would think. The problem is that most consumer grade routers aren't designed to connect to an upstream device via wireless on the same network - that is, you don't have the option with most routers to connect with wireless to an existing network, and with those that can (like my little travel router), it's designed to connect on the WAN interface, not the LAN. If you really want to keep the old router, you can buy a wireless extender with an Ethernet port, and connect it that way. But as suggested above, the more flexible solution is to go with a Raspberry Pi running CUPS, if your printer is supported.

    Edit: Short version - old routers can be repurposed, but they require a good deal of setup (turning off all routing functions, making sure their IP address is set up correctly, etc.) to do so.

    AngelHedgie on
    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    Shadowfire
  • FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Hey all, I just set up a wireless mesh network (Netgear Nighthawk) and it's been working really well and we now have solid signal everywhere in the house (lath and plaster in our old home created a lot of dead zones), but that's not the reason I'm here. My old router (Archer C7) had a USB print server which was great for connecting my non-networked laser printer into the network and allow any (Windows) device to print to it. I'd love to be able to move the printer into the closet of my office, which has an electrical outlet and some shelf space, in order to clear some space on my desk since the printer doesn't get used all that often.

    Is it possible to set up that old router as a wireless print server (connection chain: Printer--usb-->old router--wireless b/g/n-->mesh router-->all networked devices) or do I need to purchase some kind of wireless print server dongle which seems to run ~$60-100?

    Three options:

    First (recommended): A wireless print server, like this one (https://www.newegg.com/startech-pm1115uw/p/N82E16833114129). This is going to have the easiest setup and the least maintenance.

    Second: Flash your Archer C7 with a custom firmware that allows you to use it as a wireless bridge. OpenWRT would be my choice. (https://openwrt.org/toh/tp-link/archer-c7-1750) This is going to be more complicated and require more work, though. The benefit of doing this (besides not spending any money) is that you can use the OpenWRT-flashed router for other purposes as well, like running a wireless repeater.

    Third (not recommended): Raspberry Pi with CUPS. If you're going to put that much work into it, I'd just OpenWRT the old router.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
  • FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    Ok hello!! I live in a giant old house with 8 people and now that we’re all working from home our internet needs to function at a level above “kind of ok I guess”! Unfortunately that seems to be somewhat complicated by a couple of factors! First, the current set up was put together by someone who doesn’t live here any more and is not a reliable narrator so idk exactly what’s up with it! Second, Comcast (the only provider locally) thinks we are 2 houses and wants us to have 2 separate internet plans, but that is not the case and there is only one coax hookup in the house, and we cannot seem to disabuse them of this notion, so for years we have been using a WiFi extensor to get internet to the back half of the house, and that is inconsistent at Best & in one room does not work at all.

    So! What to do! I have been put in charge of this by virtue of knowing the word “coax”. We have decided that one thing we should probably do is replace the standard Comcast router with a better one??? I guess?? I dunno! What do you think?

    Currently we have

    1. The standard Comcast router
    2. These other things
    27gauml4wl9f.jpeg
    3. This guy (the extensor I think)
    ak5wvaa1ti90.jpeg

    In the following layout:
    03ymuljus44g.jpeg
    720jb3sh81cb.jpeg

    I’ve marked out where the Worst internet areas are. Also the antennae on that netgear guy have been straightened.

    Thank u for all help



    @Blameless Cleric I just wanted to commend you on doing this work and these diagrams. Mapping the space is the most important part of solving wifi coverage issues.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
    Blameless Cleric
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