[PC Build Thread] Keep your human antivirus up to date

Welcome to Part Shoppers Anonymous the Penny Arcade Computer Build Thread!
(this OP is shamelessly stolen/modified from our missing overlord alecthar (via Jebus314, and minor incident, and BouwsT).

Tl;dr:
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We do our best to provide advice about component choice, shopping for components, assembling the PC itself, and even a little bit of troubleshooting for new builds (if you're having issues). To my knowledge no forumer has ever left with a non functioning build. We'll get you there! All at a measly 250% of your original budget!

Acronyms!

PC - Personal Computer
CPU - Central Processing Unit (Computer's Brain)
GPU - Graphics Processing Unit (Computer's Muscles)
PSU - Power Supply (Computer Power Plant)
MOBO - Mother Board (Computer Skeleton / Nervous System
RAM - Random Access Memory (Computer's Short Term Memory)
HDD - Hard Disk Drive (Computer's Long Term Memory, with high capacity but low speed)
SSD - Solid State Drive (Computer's Long Term Memory, with low(er) capacity but high speeds.

"Why should I build my own computer when I could just have a bunch of underpaid assembly line workers do it for me?"
Knowledge: Building your own computer is a learning experience. To start with, you'll probably end up doing a lot of research on the current state of consumer computing hardware, along with learning a bit about how various computer components work within a complete system. You'll also gain valuable knowledge about the actual assembly of a PC, something that definitely comes in handy if you find yourself doing family tech support.
  • Quality: PCs from companies like Dell and HP are built cheaply. Sometimes this isn't a huge issue. Intel, for example, doesn't sell a separate "from the junk pile" line of CPUs. Hard drives are generally of fairly consistent quality among manufacturers. However, depending on the PC, you may end up with a fairly anemic, or even cruddy, generic PSU, along with motherboards that are generally pretty limited in their flexibility and feature-set, and don't even get me started on the cases they use. Building your own PC gives you complete control over the quality of the components you use.
  • Flexibility: A prebuilt PC sometimes comes with proprietary components, or in a case with a proprietary form factor with a weird sized PSU. When you build your own PC, you can select the components with an eye towards whatever degree of flexibility or upgrade path you deem appropriate. Because retail component design adheres to certain standards, you end up with a more modular system that can be changed more easily.
  • Value: When it comes to a PC with real horsepower, manufacturers believe we're willing to pay a serious premium. Building your own Gaming (or Workstation) PC almost always saves you significant amounts of money.

With all that said, I want to highlight a very important point. If all you need to do with a computer is browse the internet, consume media, and use productivity software like Microsoft Office, there's admittedly little reason not to buy a prebuilt machine. Because of the economy of scale, you will almost always get a higher spec'd computer for cheaper if your budget is less than $400 or so. Quality can still sometimes be an issue, and you won't gain any knowledge, but cheap computers are probably a better deal prebuilt.

"You've convinced me to build my own, what's inside the box again?"
In general there are 8 main components to a PC.
  • CPU: This is the central processing unit. It is the heart of your PC build and is what controls how quickly your computer can perform various tasks. There are only 2 manufacturers (AMD and Intel), and these days Intel is dominating. As of writing this OP, AMD has released their new Ryzen CPU's, which are presenting some much needed competition in the CPU space! Pro-tip, over the years CPUs are generally tracked by their architecture (which alludes to how they are designed) and each unique architecture is given a name (Newest are Skylake for Intel, and Ryzen for AMD). There are a multitude of different specs for CPUs, but it's nigh impossible to use them for comparison across manufactures and often times even across different architectures. Generally you will want to go to a place like Tom's Hardware and look actual measured comparisons between the chips to decide... If you're looking for high end performance, and the best bang for your buck, you will also want to look out for unlocked CPUs that allow for overclocking. These days it is a very painless process, and can easily give you a 10-30% performance boost for the cost of a bigger heatsink. For intel CPUs, model numbers that end in a K do not come with a heatsink (as you'll likely be buying a larger one any way) and allow overclocking.
    AnandTech's Q1 2017 CPU Comparisons
    Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • GPU: This is the graphical processing unit. As the name implies it controls how pretty things will look, and what games you can play. The first important decision for your GPU is onboard versus discrete. These days Intel and AMD are offering combined CPU/GPU chips that are really pretty good. For everything besides gaming and graphic intensive work, these combined chips offer the best performance at the cheapest price. If you're building a HTPC (home theater PC) for example this is definitely the way to go. AMD may lead on the higher end, as their APU line (their terminology for the combined CPU/GPU) can have better GPU performance with similar CPU performance than the corresponding Intel products. A top of the line AMD APU will be good enough to stream any video content, watch blurays, and even play some older games at moderate settings...
    If, however, you are looking to game or do a lot of video editing/other graphics intensive work, then a discrete graphics card is the way to go. For the purposes of gaming, the rest of your system is mainly an effort to get out of your video card's way. The price of a solid video card reflects that; for gaming PCs the video card will be the most expensive single component you purchase. For discrete GPUs there are again 2 manufacturers, AMD (formally ATI) and Nvidia. Unlike CPUs the GPU race has been a bit stale for well over a year, but we're always hoping for better competition to allow for good consumer choice! To make things more confusing AMD and Nvidia don't actually sell graphics cards themselves, instead the sell the designs (or base hardware) to other companies who build them and sell them to consumers. This means that for any given GPU model (say the Nvidia GTX 1060), there will be several different vendors selling that exact model (like this GTX 1060 sold by EVGA). Different vendors can have different coolers, different amounts of overclocking, and different build quality, so be careful with who the exact card is coming from. Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • Motherboard: The motherboard is the complex circuitry that connects all of your fancy parts together. Buying a motherboard is all about quality, compatibility, and options. The two most important compatibility issues are getting the right socket for your CPU, and getting the right size for your case. Whatever CPU you are interested in getting should have a corresponding socket number (like LGA 1151 for Kaby Lake Intel based CPUs), and you absolutely must get a motherboard with that socket. Motherboards also generally come in a few different sizes (or form factors), with the most common being: ATX, micro-ATX, mini-ATX, and mini-ITX. The key here is to make sure that you Case specifically says it is compatible with the form factor you choose. For quality purposes you generally want to stick to the main manufacturers: MSI, ASUS, EVGA, ASRock, and Gigabyte. Finally, it's all about the options. Make a list of everything that you want to hook up to your PC and what type of connection it needs (USB 3.0 vs 2.0, HDMI vs DVI vs Display Port, eSADA, ect...) and find yourself a motherboard that has all the necessary connections. Other things to consider are SLI/crossfire compatibility (which allows you to run 2+ GPUs simultaneously for Nvidia or AMD cards respectively), PCI-E slots (quantity and bandwidth per slot typically described as 8x or 16x), CPU overclocking compatible, onboard GPU compatible, soundcard capabilities, and ethernet capabilities. Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • Memory: This is often referred to as the RAM or Random Access Memory, and it controls how many things you can do at once. These days there are basically 3 rules to follow when buying RAM. (1) Buy DDR4: Only legacy sockets from AMD and Intel support DDR2 and DDR3 is quickly being phased out. This is a compatibility check with the motherboard so always look at the motherboard specs to verify, but almost everything currently sold these days is DDR4. (2) Don't overthing the RAM speed (2400 MHz can be had for cheap). Slower and you may seem some changes in performance for a cheaper price, and faster does NOT provide a good performance per dollar value. Timings largely mean nothing, and should be completely ignored for your first build. (3) Buy 8-16 GB and as many DIMMS (or sticks) as channels on your motherboard. So if your motherboard supports 2 channel memory, get 2 sticks of 8GB Ram (for 16GB total). RAM is cheap so lean towards more rather than less, but for most people anything more than 32 GB will be wasted (even 32 GB+ is only for most power users, or insane amounts of multi-tasking). Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • Hard Disk Drive/Solid State Drive: This is where all of your software and data is stored. If you're budget can swing it the most effective setup is to use a smaller SSD (240-500 GB) for your programs and OS, and a larger HDD (1-4 TB) for media storage. Not all SSDs and not all HDDs are created equal. For HDDs the spindle speed (typically 5400, 7200, and 10000 RPMs) dictates how quickly you will be able to access your data, with higher RPMs giving faster access. For purely data storage the speed tends not to matter that much, but for programs/games loading will be much faster. Any SSD will be far quicker than even the best HDDs. Most importantly for both you want something that is reliable, so check the comments/reviews for any particular model. Just keep in mind that every single model ever created will have some small number of drives that fail and those will be the bulk of the people leaving comments. As a general rule, Samsung 850 EVO SSD's, and Wester Digital brand HDD's are generally the golden rule. Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • PSU: This is the power supply unit, and as the name implies it powers your PC. There are 3 basic factors to consider for a PSU: modular/non-modular, wattage, and efficiency. A non-modular PSU will have all of the cables permanently attached and can be a pain to keep organized compared to being able to remove unnecessary cables. Wattage is the amount of power your PSU can supply and you generally want your computer to run close to but not at the maximum rating for your PSU. To see what that would be before you buy your PSU, just find any online wattage calculator, put in the parts you want to use, and viola. Finally there is the efficiency, which is rated as Bronze, Silver, Gold, etc and indicate how efficiently the PSU takes your wall power and converts it to useable power for your PC. Generally Seasonic (and PSU's build by Seasonic and sold under different names) are the golden standard here on the forum. Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • Case: This is where you put all those things above. Don't underestimate the importance of a good case. A Good cable management system and layout can make building a PC a vastly superior experience, as well as giving longevity to your build through superior heat management. Also that shit should look badass. The only requirement though is that you find a case that is large enough to house all of your components (this is not a trick, often times GPUs, PSUs, certain types of memory, and some optical drives will not fit in a particular case), and can accept the form factor for the motherboard used. Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
  • Bling Factor LED lighting is critical to PC modding, and should be included in every case and component where possible.

    I've done extensive research into LEDs (I went to college for this), I'll go ahead and quote an old post I made regarding my findings:
    LEDs play a vital role in any PC build! In case anyone doesn't know, no PC is complete without an associated set of colored LEDs. However, it is very important that you choose your LED colors carefully, as each one has specific advantages:
    Red LEDs are very powerful. They make your PC run much, much faster. If you are looking to get a performance boost but can't afford higher quality parts or are unable to overclock, red LEDs are the way to go. Just make sure to beef up your cooling levels, because they will make your PC run much hotter. All of the top MLG Pro gamers use red LEDs (including myself).

    Blue LEDs are great. They make your machine run much cooler. If your ambient temperatures are on the rise and you can't afford spending $20 a piece on high quality Noctua fans or $Idaho on expensive watercooling setups, blue LEDs are your best bet. I once knew a guy who had so many blue LEDs that his case pulled double duty as a minifridge. Not even joking. We'd keep the root beer in there during LAN parties.

    Green LEDs are great because they make your system use significantly less AC power to run, thus lowering both your electricity bill and your carbon footprint. A set of high quality green LEDs surrounding a 1000w PSU will bring its power draw down to as low as 4-500w (not counting the extra power used to run the green LEDs).

    White LEDs are (on paper) the best option, as they combine the benefits of red, blue, and green LEDs. Be very careful though!, white LEDs aren't very common because the light gives you cancer.

    Legends tell of the fabled Purple LED, but so far they have eluded me. Could such a thing really exist? While evidence suggesting the existence of purple LEDs has been found in ancient Sumerian ruins, my years of investigation and research have led me to the conclusion that purple LEDs are a myth that exist solely in the delusional babblings of men who have gone mad while searching for them. The are the El Dorado of the PC building world.

    You might think to yourself "Why wouldn't I combine LED colors in my case and gain multiple advantages without the drawbacks of white LEDs?". In the early fifties, when PC LEDs were still in their infancy, LED-combination experimentation using a series of lead sheets and mirrors appeared promising (aside from a few tragic mishaps due to the ineffective safety measures prevalent in laboratories at the time), unfortunately combining LED colors has proven impossible, as the effects simply cancel each other out.

    Sure, some people prefer a "pure" PC and might not use LEDs at all, considering them to be "cheating", but you gotta ask yourself - if you were an Olympic athlete, and someone said you could inject LEDs to make your performance significantly better, would that be "cheating"? Of course not.

    Hope this helps.
  • Other: This is just a list of other parts to keep in mind, that you may or may not need. Additional fans, optical drive, soundcard, WiFi card (or USB dongle), monitor, keyboard, mouse, cables (fan cables, SATA cables, ect...), aftermarket CPU heatsink (necessary for overclocking), and zipties (or other cable management device). Feel free to ask for current recommendations.
"Ok I know what a PC is now, but where do I start?"
Here are a few questions you should ask yourself when you're ready to start researching parts for your new PC. Once you have some answers to these questions, post them in this thread and others will jump in to fill in the gaps and get you well on your way to completing your order! Don't be intimidated if you don't know any of the answers though, as any questions (no matter how basic) are always welcome. In general though, the more information we have about what you want and how much you're willing to pay to get it, the better the advice you'll get.
  • What kind of computer do you need? The 4 basic categories are: standard gaming PC, HTPC, server, and a serious Workstation.
  • What's your budget for this project?
  • What needs to be included in that budget? Do you need a monitor, keyboard and mouse to go with it? Are there components from a previous PC that you are carrying over to the new build? What about an operating system (like Windows 10)?
  • What are your performance needs? For games, what resolution do you game at, and what kind of performance do you want to see there? For professional tasks, what are you doing and what kind of numbers would you like to see?
  • Do you have any partiality towards specific manufacturers, like Intel/AMD, AMD/NVIDIA, or perhaps specific vendors?
  • Do you have any specific needs? That is, are you looking for quiet operation, small form factor, significant upgrade-ability, or other specific features?


"I'm totes ready to buy, but everyone keeps posting this PC partpicker thing. Where do I actually get my stuff?"
US
There are a number of solid online purchasing options available to US consumers. My personal favorite is Newegg, though there are other options like Tiger Direct, and (of course) Amazon. Brick and mortar buyers can find some components at big box retailers like Best Buy and Fry's, though I've found that prices from online retailers are significantly better than these stores. The exception to that seems to be Microcenter, which often has great deals on processors and motherboards in particular.
Canada
Some more recent opinions:
Re: first post -- for the 'Canadian shops' bit, you should add memoryexpress.com to that list (not sure how they are for mail order, but as an in-the-flesh shop, at least, they're great).
BouwsT wrote:
I used Memory Express for my last build, they are actually really great so far for their mail orders. Also, their price beat is stronger than newegg.ca (10% of difference, rather than just a straight match). I would definitely recommend them for Canadian buyers, at least to check out.
Other Links:
Amazon.ca
Newegg.ca
UK
Online retailers in the UK include Ebuyer, which apparently has a wide selection of components, Novatech, which also does custom systems and apparently has some fans in UK PC forums, and dabs.com, a site recommend by our very own Big Isy, who cited their frequent free shipping/free game deals.
Australia
Our very own Tef put together a very thorough buying guide for Australians:
Tef wrote:
Online retailers (Australia-wide)
  • www.pccasegear.com - Based in Melbourne, these guys are as close to an Australian Newegg as you will find. PCcasegear are known for their reliable service and good RMA (returning faulty equipment) policies. They have a somewhat decent range of equipment, for Australia and while generally pretty cheap, there certainly are cheaper options out there. For people in Melbourne, you can also visit their store front and pick up the parts personally.
  • www.msy.com.au - A cheaper alternative to PCcasegear that is still reasonably reliable. MSY does suffer from a limited range and volume of stock on occasion. As of October 2011, they do not have a delivery system in place (in progress, according to MSY) so you will have to pick up the parts from their brick and mortar shops. Fortunately, they have numerous store fronts around the country, so finding one nearby shouldn't be too hard to do. Be aware that when you're shopping online make sure you set your store location to the store that you'll be picking the parts up from. MSY filter their displayed products based on what shop you've selected and it's very annoying to get to the checkout and realise all your parts are only available in far north Queensland.
Other Australia-based Online Retailers
www.mwave.com.au www.megabuy.com.au www.umart.com.au - These are some other notable budget PC shops. They'll ship anywhere domestically and are usually competitively priced. Do note that they're budget resellers (particularly in the case of megabuy) and their customer support and shipping status/timeframes may not always be as great as what you'll find from MSY/PCcasegear.
International Purchasing
An option exists to purchase parts overseas and ship them in yourself, thus avoiding the mark-up from Aussie vendors. www.priceusa.com.au is the only vendor the writer has experience with and therefore is the only one this writer is prepared to recommend with confidence. There are several caveats associated with international orders, namely that support/returns will be more difficult due to distances and there is a potential for longer lead-times on orders (though this is not always the case). Recommendations for overseas shipping would be that you don't order cases and possibly PSUs from overseas, as the associated hikes in shipping costs make this expensive (it should go without saying that you should do your own research on this point though, as it may be more cost effective depending on where you can buy domestically).
Purchase Support and Services
www.staticice.com.au and www.ausprices.com are two good price comparison sites that you can use to find who's selling what and for how much. The former is probably the highest quality of the two; just make sure you're looking at the Australian version (i.e. .au at the end)

While ostensibly a forum for PC overlockers, forums.overclockers.com.au has a surprisingly good quality sub forum relating to the state of PC part purchasing in Australia. They are a good location for solid advice on retailers (after PA, of course!).
Failing all that, send a mention or a PM towards Tef or chrishallett83, both Australian forumers, who are usually more than happy to offer advice.
And here is a handy flowchart!
zzwoPOS.png

Sagroth wrote: »
Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
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Posts

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Ok, this is a good one
    4i8el6bt90zz.jpeg

    IncindiumOrcaübergeekXeddicusjungleroomxemp123Aridholchrishallett83IanatorMyiagros
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    It's cute I suppose...I'm just sort over the whole "PC master race" thing. Consoles are important, they set the floor for what's possible in computer gaming. They allow a completely un-techsaavy audience who can afford one five hundred dollar machine every 5-7 years to at least participate.

    This isn't directed at you Mugsley, it's just a general gripe I have right now with new consoles on the horizon and the PC space doing that overly defensive, "but our machines are better hurgleblurgle" thing we tend to do.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
    wunderbara5ehrenIanatorAngelHedgieInquisitor77Mulletude
  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    It's cute I suppose...I'm just sort over the whole "PC master race" thing. Consoles are important, they set the floor for what's possible in computer gaming. They allow a completely un-techsaavy audience who can afford one five hundred dollar machine every 5-7 years to at least participate.

    This isn't directed at you Mugsley, it's just a general gripe I have right now with new consoles on the horizon and the PC space doing that overly defensive, "but our machines are better hurgleblurgle" thing we tend to do.

    We're just trying to justify our lack of some console exclusives.

    (Primary PC gamer, but I own a PS4 and just bought a Switch. Coexistence is very possible).

    GnomeTankBullheadhtm
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx antifa anti american nazi socialist terrorist fascist alien warmonger Registered User regular
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    It's cute I suppose...I'm just sort over the whole "PC master race" thing. Consoles are important, they set the floor for what's possible in computer gaming. They allow a completely un-techsaavy audience who can afford one five hundred dollar machine every 5-7 years to at least participate.

    This isn't directed at you Mugsley, it's just a general gripe I have right now with new consoles on the horizon and the PC space doing that overly defensive, "but our machines are better hurgleblurgle" thing we tend to do.

    tbf

    Make. Time.
    GnomeTankAridholBouwsT
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    Orca wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    It's cute I suppose...I'm just sort over the whole "PC master race" thing. Consoles are important, they set the floor for what's possible in computer gaming. They allow a completely un-techsaavy audience who can afford one five hundred dollar machine every 5-7 years to at least participate.

    This isn't directed at you Mugsley, it's just a general gripe I have right now with new consoles on the horizon and the PC space doing that overly defensive, "but our machines are better hurgleblurgle" thing we tend to do.

    We're just trying to justify our lack of some console exclusives.

    (Primary PC gamer, but I own a PS4 and just bought a Switch. Coexistence is very possible).

    I have a PS4 Pro, a Switch and a One X. I just like gaming tech. It's wholly unnecessary, my PC is a monster compared to the consoles...but I enjoy them for what they are.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • shadowaneshadowane Registered User regular
    Have the ram, graphics card, and now processor for my wife's new computer. Just a few more pieces to go.

    Rich on Beer - I talk about drinking beer. You read about it.
    MugsleyThe Escape GoatBouwsT
  • XeddicusXeddicus Registered User regular
    Consoles aren't horrible or anything, but they have set games design back a bit. Controls, area sizes, memory limitations. These things aren't designed around so much as the design is scaled to fit since that's where the money is. Hopefully this changes more and more.

    My 360 red-ringed again recently, I should crack it open to see if I can fix it again.

    "For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men. Not women. Not beasts...this you can trust."
  • HeatwaveHeatwave Come, now, and walk the path of explosions with me!Registered User regular
    Not sure if this is related, but I thought I'd try asking here anyway.

    Does anyone know if there would be much of a difference gaming online with an internet upload speed of 20Mbps vs 40Mbps?

    I'm thinking of changing my plan from 600GB to unlimited for like $1AUD more, but my upload speed would drop to 20Mbps.

    I currently don't need the extra data, as I usually use around 100GB a month, something more. Also if I'm forced to work from home I'd rather not want to worry about how much data gets used by whatever work applications get used or even updates.

    Plus I could stream more HQ content instead of limiting myself to SD.

    P2n5r3l.jpg
    Steam / Origin & Wii U: Heatwave111 / FC: 4227-1965-3206 / Battle.net: Heatwave#11356
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Heatwave wrote: »
    Not sure if this is related, but I thought I'd try asking here anyway.

    Does anyone know if there would be much of a difference gaming online with an internet upload speed of 20Mbps vs 40Mbps?

    I'm thinking of changing my plan from 600GB to unlimited for like $1AUD more, but my upload speed would drop to 20Mbps.

    I currently don't need the extra data, as I usually use around 100GB a month, something more. Also if I'm forced to work from home I'd rather not want to worry about how much data gets used by whatever work applications get used or even updates.

    Plus I could stream more HQ content instead of limiting myself to SD.

    I stream 1080p youtube all the time (sometimes hours per day) and haven't gotten near my 250GB cap for as long as I can remember. For gaming you want the lowest possible ping, upload bandwidth is basically negligible because the datastream the servers use is all pure code, it's kB/s of data, not megs.

    PailryderBahamutZERO
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    I'm at Gigabit down and 30 Mbps up. I don't have issues with slow downs or quality. We've used applications like Zoom in the past week without degradation.

    If you're not trying to update databases or move files on a regular basis, I don't expect you'll have a problem. (Insert Internet Rando Disclaimer Here)

  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    Yeah upload speeds, for typical usage, aren't nearly so critical.

  • HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited March 30
    oh shit new thread
    can we ban RGB this time around? ;)

    edit - actually realtalk: if we could ban the phrase "PC Master Race" that'd be great. the racist connotations are so gross and I hate that this is in the lexicon

    Hardtarget on
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    chrishallett83cardboard delusionstsmvengyjungleroomxa5ehrenIncindiumShadowfireBahamutZEROIanatorexpendableTurambarMulletudeArmoroc
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Xeddicus wrote: »
    Consoles aren't horrible or anything, but they have set games design back a bit. Controls, area sizes, memory limitations. These things aren't designed around so much as the design is scaled to fit since that's where the money is. Hopefully this changes more and more.

    My 360 red-ringed again recently, I should crack it open to see if I can fix it again.

    I mean, you could argue that PC architecture is holding games back far more than console limitations.

  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    Xeddicus wrote: »
    Consoles aren't horrible or anything, but they have set games design back a bit. Controls, area sizes, memory limitations. These things aren't designed around so much as the design is scaled to fit since that's where the money is. Hopefully this changes more and more.

    My 360 red-ringed again recently, I should crack it open to see if I can fix it again.

    I mean, you could argue that PC architecture is holding games back far more than console limitations.

    what do you mean by that (genuinely curious)

    DevoutlyApatheticchrishallett83BouwsT
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    I take it to mean that it's difficult to program for a massive variety of combinations and manufacturers. As well as potential interference from 3rd party software, differing drivers, and the random quality of the person who owns and runs the machine.

    And, for games at least, every five years or so you'll need to buy it all over again adding more to the list of things to deal with.

  • jungleroomxjungleroomx antifa anti american nazi socialist terrorist fascist alien warmonger Registered User regular
    edited March 30
    Interesting video, AMDs new mobile chip (4900 HS) just absolutely smoked Intels 9880HK.


    jungleroomx on
    Make. Time.
    V1m
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Even if you ignore all of that, there are a lot of unnecessary hurdles. Non kernel-mode software can't directly access graphics or audio hardware, there are large performance penalties for doing things like framebuffer DMA via the CPU.

    a5ehren
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx antifa anti american nazi socialist terrorist fascist alien warmonger Registered User regular
    edited March 30
    I take it to mean that it's difficult to program for a massive variety of combinations and manufacturers. As well as potential interference from 3rd party software, differing drivers, and the random quality of the person who owns and runs the machine.

    And, for games at least, every five years or so you'll need to buy it all over again adding more to the list of things to deal with.

    PC hardware differentiation is mostly handled by the game engines. A vast majority of the compatibility work is done by Unreal or Unity, not each game.

    MS has streamlined just about everything using APIs. Theres actually not a whole lot of rogue systems with weird hardware outside of the strange secondary Southeast Asian PC markets.

    jungleroomx on
    Make. Time.
    Aridhol
  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    The big thing in a few years is that designers will still have to account for spinning rust on PC and not consoles.

    My best guess is that we'll see some pretty brutal initial loading screens along with a big jump in RAM requirements, but it will be interesting.

  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    a5ehren wrote: »
    The big thing in a few years is that designers will still have to account for spinning rust on PC and not consoles.

    My best guess is that we'll see some pretty brutal initial loading screens along with a big jump in RAM requirements, but it will be interesting.

    God I hope so.

    Spoit
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx antifa anti american nazi socialist terrorist fascist alien warmonger Registered User regular
    I thought platter drive consideration was dead like a year ago everywhere, considering the load times of some games

    Make. Time.
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    I thought platter drive consideration was dead like a year ago everywhere, considering the load times of some games

    It's more than just load times though. Platter drives influence devs' considerations for real-time level streaming.

  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    The next gen of consoles have gone to SSDs though, so devs will assume PC gamers who haven't already upgraded will do so soon.

    Hell, I built this system in 2012 and it's SSD-only.

    jungleroomxV1m
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx antifa anti american nazi socialist terrorist fascist alien warmonger Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    I thought platter drive consideration was dead like a year ago everywhere, considering the load times of some games

    It's more than just load times though. Platter drives influence devs' considerations for real-time level streaming.

    I wish there was more info on who is actually using hard drives still. I feel like they were going extinct 5 years ago.

    Make. Time.
    Bullhead
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    mowh7wgw8ytb.png

    OrcajungleroomxübergeekStormwatchertsmvengyAridhol
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    I thought platter drive consideration was dead like a year ago everywhere, considering the load times of some games

    It's more than just load times though. Platter drives influence devs' considerations for real-time level streaming.

    I wish there was more info on who is actually using hard drives still. I feel like they were going extinct 5 years ago.

    there is a world outside developed countries. SSDs are still more expensive around here, and i need like 10TB of storage space

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    I thought platter drive consideration was dead like a year ago everywhere, considering the load times of some games

    It's more than just load times though. Platter drives influence devs' considerations for real-time level streaming.

    I wish there was more info on who is actually using hard drives still. I feel like they were going extinct 5 years ago.

    HDDs still have an advantage when you want large storage capacity. I can get a 1TB SSD for ~$200 or 6TB HDD for about the same price.

    SSDs are still fucking expensive.

    OrcaKPCexpendableMulletudeForar
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    I can get a 1TB for $90 US but they are still expensive when compared to spinners

  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    Why not both? I ask as I stare at my 1 TB NVME and my 10 TB platter

    DevoutlyApatheticPailryderBullheadCormacForar
  • SpoitSpoit *twitch twitch* Registered User regular
    Interesting video, AMDs new mobile chip (4900 HS) just absolutely smoked Intels 9880HK.



    So how much money did I waste on this 3900x?

    steam_sig.png
  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    The 4900 mobile chip is based on the 3xxx desktop chips. It is very bad naming.

    jungleroomxtsmvengydanxBouwsT
  • KarlKarl Registered User regular
    PC build thread:

    I require your expertise.

    I've got a

    I5-8400
    1070ti
    16gb 2666mhz ddr4 RAM

    I'm an avid (yet terrible) Rainbow Six Siege player and I've noticed that they've released Vulkan API functionality for it. Doing some research, Vulkan should take some strain off my GPU and put it on the CPU (i think?). Is my pc Vulkan compatible?

    And are there any benchmark tools you guys recommend?

    YOU'RE ALL BABIES.
    SO MUCH POTENTIAL TO WASTE.
    Koshian wrote: »
    JOKE'S ON YOU
    MY POTENTIAL IS ALREADY WASTED
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    A quick Google says yes, the 10-series cards support vulkan according to Nvidia

  • KarlKarl Registered User regular
    edited March 31
    I've half tempted to snag 3dmark off steam and see how my setup copes

    Karl on
    YOU'RE ALL BABIES.
    SO MUCH POTENTIAL TO WASTE.
    Koshian wrote: »
    JOKE'S ON YOU
    MY POTENTIAL IS ALREADY WASTED
  • KarlKarl Registered User regular
    According to the 3dmark DX 12 test I ran, my PC is fairly mid-range. Around the 6400 mark.

    What super computers are you lot building?

    YOU'RE ALL BABIES.
    SO MUCH POTENTIAL TO WASTE.
    Koshian wrote: »
    JOKE'S ON YOU
    MY POTENTIAL IS ALREADY WASTED
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    The current hotness is a Ryzen 3600 CPU coupled with either a 2070 or 5700XT

    I myself am awaiting the Zen 3 desktop CPUs, probably out in October (pandemics permitting)

    AridholStormwatcher
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Karl wrote: »
    According to the 3dmark DX 12 test I ran, my PC is fairly mid-range. Around the 6400 mark.

    What super computers are you lot building?

    A 3950x with a OC'd 2080ti.

    AridholBouwsT
  • KarlKarl Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    Karl wrote: »
    According to the 3dmark DX 12 test I ran, my PC is fairly mid-range. Around the 6400 mark.

    What super computers are you lot building?

    A 3950x with a OC'd 2080ti.

    @LD50 is developing AI at home confirmed

    YOU'RE ALL BABIES.
    SO MUCH POTENTIAL TO WASTE.
    Koshian wrote: »
    JOKE'S ON YOU
    MY POTENTIAL IS ALREADY WASTED
  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    Karl wrote: »
    PC build thread:

    I require your expertise.

    I've got a

    I5-8400
    1070ti
    16gb 2666mhz ddr4 RAM

    I'm an avid (yet terrible) Rainbow Six Siege player and I've noticed that they've released Vulkan API functionality for it. Doing some research, Vulkan should take some strain off my GPU and put it on the CPU (i think?). Is my pc Vulkan compatible?

    And are there any benchmark tools you guys recommend?

    Considering what you already have, I would wait for the next CPU generation to upgrade. You already have 6 cores. GPU could obviously be upgraded at any point. How's your SSD situation?

    steam_sig.png
    V1m
  • KarlKarl Registered User regular
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    Karl wrote: »
    PC build thread:

    I require your expertise.

    I've got a

    I5-8400
    1070ti
    16gb 2666mhz ddr4 RAM

    I'm an avid (yet terrible) Rainbow Six Siege player and I've noticed that they've released Vulkan API functionality for it. Doing some research, Vulkan should take some strain off my GPU and put it on the CPU (i think?). Is my pc Vulkan compatible?

    And are there any benchmark tools you guys recommend?

    Considering what you already have, I would wait for the next CPU generation to upgrade. You already have 6 cores. GPU could obviously be upgraded at any point. How's your SSD situation?

    I've got a 250gig SSD that's chugging along. It's fine so far as the only modernish game I play is siege and worst case I can just uninstall that if there's a space issue.

    My question was more "if I run the vulkan API option on games, will my pc cope". Which it seems it will?

    I'm playing at 1080p mind

    YOU'RE ALL BABIES.
    SO MUCH POTENTIAL TO WASTE.
    Koshian wrote: »
    JOKE'S ON YOU
    MY POTENTIAL IS ALREADY WASTED
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