[Natural Disasters] redux: Fires, Hurricanes, Floods, and everything else

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  • HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    Born and raised Puget Sounder here. For the longest time, our summers used to go from approximately the middle of July until the beginning/middle of September. Rainfall wasn't uncommon, either; we rarely went more than a month without some form of downpour, be it powerful or middling. I can count on one hand the number of times in my youth that "Fire Season" was a thing that made the local news and still have enough fingers left over to slap a climate denier. The change in the character of our average regional conditions has happened rapidly and with great ferocity. Summer has become a snarling dragon of a season, breathing fire and smoke, growing longer and more unmanageable with each passing year. The apocalyptic betting game between ice and fire has produced a red result written on the smokey sky outside my window. Average rainfall is down, acreage lost to fires are up, glaciers are shrinking, forests are dying, rivers are drying, and inexplicably my rent keeps rising.

    It pains me to say it, but this place has become the literal hellscape foretold of in so much glossy cyberpunk media from Neuromancer to Shadowrun, and everything in between. I'd say I hope we can get a fix on this with someone else in the White House, but I also know that the national parties by and large don't give a fuck about people on the west coast, so I won't hold my breath.

    Or rather, I will hold my breath, because the air isn't fit to breathe.

    IncenjucarPreacherTicaldfjamLikeaBosh
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    Counterpoint to the fire season thing
    https://www.thestranger.com/slog/2018/08/15/30818635/seattles-summers-should-be-a-bit-smoky
    When Mark Twain arrived in Olympia on an August day in 1895 his welcome party had an apology for him.

    “I am sorry the smoke is so dense that you cannot see our mountains and our forests, which are now on fire,” said John Miller Murphy, the editor of the local paper.

    Twain was experiencing a fairly common summer occurrence in the 19th-century Puget Sound Lowlands, as the millions of surrounding acres of forests followed their natural burn cycle, occasionally filling the region with smoke and blocking the mountain views that Twain’s welcome party had hoped to impress upon him.

    Those natural fires went away soon after Twain's trip thanks to our government's fire suppression efforts, effectively stopping smoke from ever filling spaces like Seattle. We've spent a century unnaturally suppressing wildfires, an effort that we are now reckoning with by experiencing bigger and more destructive fires. And more smoke in our cities.

    Smoke in Seattle is not an abnormality, it's the absence of smoke for over a century that is strange.

    And now we get the one two punch: those fires are now too big to control and climate change is making them much worse.

    thatassemblyguyIncenjucarJragghenStarZapperdispatch.ofurlionSmrtnikNobeardA Kobold's KoboldDevlin_Dragonus
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/09/12/weather/tropical-update-gulf-storm-saturday/index.html

    Tropical storm Sally formed in the gulf and is now expected to become a hurricane (earlier today it only had medium chance to make tropical storm just before landfall). It's expected to make landfall in Mississippi, watches are on place from Louisiana to the Florida panhandle.

    This is not expected to be a severe storm, unless you're right on the coast or in an area that's not expecting water or power to be restored for weeks from the last storm (Sorry Louisiana).


    On the records, this is an 18 day record break for the S storm, and also a record break for the biggest record break. T is almost certain to be named in the next couple days, the record is 22 days out right now, so it's sure to be both an even bigger record break.

  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Checking in from Vancouver BC. We've apparently got the second worst air quality on the planet today behind Portland. It was weirdly cool out due to the smoke blocking the sun. Was not a smart day to re-arrange my garage. Never great when the weather forecast is "Smoke"

    We may get some rain Monday night, hope the states do too.

    :so_raven:
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    Corvus wrote: »
    Checking in from Vancouver BC. We've apparently got the second worst air quality on the planet today behind Portland. It was weirdly cool out due to the smoke blocking the sun. Was not a smart day to re-arrange my garage. Never great when the weather forecast is "Smoke"

    We may get some rain Monday night, hope the states do too.


    Perhaps this can be filed under "weather whiplash". On Thursday, Seattle reached a record high of 91. A temperature that warm had occurred only 7 times so late in the year. Today, just 48 hours later, the high was 61. This was the second coldest September 12th on record.

    Same situation here, as far as smoke clears go. I think OR/CA are still fucked for a bit

  • IncenjucarIncenjucar Not a Fictional Character Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    California's Creek Fire is 8% contained! Progress! Sadly, still 196,667 burned, but at least it's getting less explosive. Doesn't help any of the other poor folks and critters in the path of the main destruction, but it looks like my family is at least going to get through this one in one piece, for now.

    Gnome-InterruptusGiantGeek2020JragghenNobearddurandal4532ElvenshaeDoctor Detroit
  • BullheadBullhead Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/09/12/weather/tropical-update-gulf-storm-saturday/index.html

    Tropical storm Sally formed in the gulf and is now expected to become a hurricane (earlier today it only had medium chance to make tropical storm just before landfall). It's expected to make landfall in Mississippi, watches are on place from Louisiana to the Florida panhandle.

    This is not expected to be a severe storm, unless you're right on the coast or in an area that's not expecting water or power to be restored for weeks from the last storm (Sorry Louisiana).


    On the records, this is an 18 day record break for the S storm, and also a record break for the biggest record break. T is almost certain to be named in the next couple days, the record is 22 days out right now, so it's sure to be both an even bigger record break.

    Problem right now with Sally (at least here in florida) is flooding. It's been raining for like 3 weeks solid here and this is not helping, most of the west coast of florida is under flood watches/warnings. I've had to drain the pool down about 5 inches already once (it was about to overflow) and it's already pushing back up close to needing it again >.<

    camo_sig2.png
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/09/12/weather/tropical-update-gulf-storm-saturday/index.html

    Tropical storm Sally formed in the gulf and is now expected to become a hurricane (earlier today it only had medium chance to make tropical storm just before landfall). It's expected to make landfall in Mississippi, watches are on place from Louisiana to the Florida panhandle.

    This is not expected to be a severe storm, unless you're right on the coast or in an area that's not expecting water or power to be restored for weeks from the last storm (Sorry Louisiana).


    On the records, this is an 18 day record break for the S storm, and also a record break for the biggest record break. T is almost certain to be named in the next couple days, the record is 22 days out right now, so it's sure to be both an even bigger record break.

    Problem right now with Sally (at least here in florida) is flooding. It's been raining for like 3 weeks solid here and this is not helping, most of the west coast of florida is under flood watches/warnings. I've had to drain the pool down about 5 inches already once (it was about to overflow) and it's already pushing back up close to needing it again >.<

    Send some rain to Seattle we miss it and want our moody shitty rain back. This smoke aint it.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    WeaverJragghenTicaldfjam
  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    Preacher wrote: »
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/09/12/weather/tropical-update-gulf-storm-saturday/index.html

    Tropical storm Sally formed in the gulf and is now expected to become a hurricane (earlier today it only had medium chance to make tropical storm just before landfall). It's expected to make landfall in Mississippi, watches are on place from Louisiana to the Florida panhandle.

    This is not expected to be a severe storm, unless you're right on the coast or in an area that's not expecting water or power to be restored for weeks from the last storm (Sorry Louisiana).


    On the records, this is an 18 day record break for the S storm, and also a record break for the biggest record break. T is almost certain to be named in the next couple days, the record is 22 days out right now, so it's sure to be both an even bigger record break.

    Problem right now with Sally (at least here in florida) is flooding. It's been raining for like 3 weeks solid here and this is not helping, most of the west coast of florida is under flood watches/warnings. I've had to drain the pool down about 5 inches already once (it was about to overflow) and it's already pushing back up close to needing it again >.<

    Send some rain to Seattle we miss it and want our moody shitty rain back. This smoke aint it.

    The entire west coast has become London circa 1900, but with fewer horses.

  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Orca wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/09/12/weather/tropical-update-gulf-storm-saturday/index.html

    Tropical storm Sally formed in the gulf and is now expected to become a hurricane (earlier today it only had medium chance to make tropical storm just before landfall). It's expected to make landfall in Mississippi, watches are on place from Louisiana to the Florida panhandle.

    This is not expected to be a severe storm, unless you're right on the coast or in an area that's not expecting water or power to be restored for weeks from the last storm (Sorry Louisiana).


    On the records, this is an 18 day record break for the S storm, and also a record break for the biggest record break. T is almost certain to be named in the next couple days, the record is 22 days out right now, so it's sure to be both an even bigger record break.

    Problem right now with Sally (at least here in florida) is flooding. It's been raining for like 3 weeks solid here and this is not helping, most of the west coast of florida is under flood watches/warnings. I've had to drain the pool down about 5 inches already once (it was about to overflow) and it's already pushing back up close to needing it again >.<

    Send some rain to Seattle we miss it and want our moody shitty rain back. This smoke aint it.

    The entire west coast has become London circa 1900, but with fewer horses.

    But more peoples ability to pronounce the H sound.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    ElvenshaeMosati
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    Current visibility where I am just outside of Portland, OR is about 50 feet. It's going to feel real strange going to the grocery store in a respirator in a little bit.

    It feels like I'm watching a prequel to The Road.

    PreacherWeaver
  • NobeardNobeard North Carolina: Failed StateRegistered User regular
    Hacksaw wrote: »
    Born and raised Puget Sounder here. For the longest time, our summers used to go from approximately the middle of July until the beginning/middle of September. Rainfall wasn't uncommon, either; we rarely went more than a month without some form of downpour, be it powerful or middling. I can count on one hand the number of times in my youth that "Fire Season" was a thing that made the local news and still have enough fingers left over to slap a climate denier. The change in the character of our average regional conditions has happened rapidly and with great ferocity. Summer has become a snarling dragon of a season, breathing fire and smoke, growing longer and more unmanageable with each passing year. The apocalyptic betting game between ice and fire has produced a red result written on the smokey sky outside my window. Average rainfall is down, acreage lost to fires are up, glaciers are shrinking, forests are dying, rivers are drying, and inexplicably my rent keeps rising.

    It pains me to say it, but this place has become the literal hellscape foretold of in so much glossy cyberpunk media from Neuromancer to Shadowrun, and everything in between. I'd say I hope we can get a fix on this with someone else in the White House, but I also know that the national parties by and large don't give a fuck about people on the west coast, so I won't hold my breath.

    Or rather, I will hold my breath, because the air isn't fit to breathe.

    Nice bit of climate change poetry there.

    I'm not saying we are going to have an autocratic dystopia, but things keep happening that look like they come from an autocratic dystopia.
    OrcaIncenjucarElvenshaeHacksawSkeithfurlionGnome-InterruptusJazzSolar
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Phoenix-D wrote: »
    I think this might win for creepiest video of the month. Erg.



    re climate change vs brush clearing / forest management: Honestly? It's both. Hotter, dryer forests. More intense and shorter rainy seasons leading to more dry brush to burn. We would be having problems even if we hadn't cocked up forest management. And if we'd fixed climate change we'd still be having bad fires. The two just combine to make things much worse.

    So, there are a bunch of things that bug me about this "firenado." First is the lack of scale. How big is that thing? There's nothing here for reference. Are those fires on the ground the size of houses or the size of leaves? This could be a huge tornado or a tiny dust devil (very common in fires, I will add). Second, it is spinning anti-cyclonically, which is exceedingly rare for tornados in the northern hemisphere, and fire tornados themselves are rarer still. To have both phenomena in a single specimen is somewhat unlikely. Finally, the siren is so loud they must have been standing right next to it, which also seems unlikely, and it's strange to me that it starts up perfectly with the start of the video. Odds are the siren sound effect was added to make the video more dramatic.

    Don't get me wrong, fire tornados are real... but I'm calling fake on this one.

    Here's a real fire tornado for reference:

    0u0ob7yvdub2.jpg

    Note that it is clearly huge, and it is descending from a pyrocumulus (fire generated storm cloud).

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    thatassemblyguy
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Fiery equivalents of "dust devils" are entirely common in big brush fires and are nowhere near the same as actual tornadoes. An actual tornado can have windspeed that will strip the paint off your car and then fling it two miles away. That little "firenado" (fire aside) probably wouldn't even be that hard to stand up in and is probably no more than thirty or so feet tall, and is just part of what happens when you have enough fire around to move the air around a bunch; for every one of them caught on video, there's probably a dozen being missed. It just means there is a bunch of turbulent air around.

    The fire itself is infinitely more devastating than that teeny teeny atmospheric event could be.

    BullheadAbsoluteZeroTynnanInvectivusSkeithShadowfireSleepHavelock2.0Sorce
  • Blackhawk1313Blackhawk1313 Registered User regular
    edited September 16
    Tornado Watch here in PC, getting some licks from the bands coming on shore, water is about 6 feet in to the driveway at this point. We should be fine, if a bit trapped for awhile, but there’s areas here where mailboxes are submerged at this point. And it hasn’t even made its landfall. Gonna be a bit of a mess when all is said and done.

    Blackhawk1313 on
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar Not a Fictional Character Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Creek Fire is at 220,025 acres, 18% contained.

    And of course now another person I care about had to evacuate because of a different fire.

  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    Tornado Watch here in PC, getting some licks from the bands coming on shore, water is about 6 feet in to the driveway at this point. We should be fine, if a bit trapped for awhile, but there’s areas here where mailboxes are submerged at this point. And it hasn’t even made its landfall. Gonna be a bit of a mess when all is said and done.

    PC?

  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited September 16
    Typo of BC, perhaps?

    Edit: or not. A cursory google'ing isn't showing much flooding going on in BC right now.

    Forar on
    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
  • VeeveeVeevee WisconsinRegistered User regular
    Panama City, Florida

    VishNubLucedesJazz
  • Blackhawk1313Blackhawk1313 Registered User regular
    More specifically Lynn Haven, which is nestled right next to Panama City, FL. Tornado warnings throughout the night, a river for a road, and a flash flood warning just came in. And we aren’t done yet because Sally is straight up crawling across.

    Jazz
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Forar wrote: »
    Typo of BC, perhaps?

    Edit: or not. A cursory google'ing isn't showing much flooding going on in BC right now.

    We don't get much coastal flooding in BC, it's usually river floods due to snow pack melt.

    :so_raven:
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar Not a Fictional Character Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    So, with one of the major fires headed their way, a person I know pretty much just said F this and *moved away from the countryside* with their family rather that fret over whether or not the fire was going to eat their home and all their stuff.

    I doubt they're the only ones making that kind of decision this year. Climate change and mismanagement of federal land is basically turning people into rural refugees.

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