[Gardening], the activity of tending and cultivating a garden, especially as a pastime.

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Posts

  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    2exi2huvr3cj.jpg

    Grandfather Ashlock tomato. Beefsteak, very large, like 1lb.

    Also, probably the most delicious tomato I have ever had.

    Slap some of those bad boys in some BLTs. The ultimate sandwich for enjoying what a tomato has to offer.

    So I made BLTs for my wife and I yesterday, and they were amazing.

    Today, I took it up a level:

    4ulue63spsv3.jpg
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    Bacon cheeseburgers with Grandfather Ashlock tomatoes with hydroponic lettuce. Just mayo, american cheese.

    Best damned hamburger I've ever had. It was sublime.

    Hmmmm

    That first pic made me think of a caprese blt

    B for basil, not bacon, but you use an avocado spread on the bread to bring in some richness to offset the lack of bacon

  • AntinumericAntinumeric Registered User regular
    Antoshka wrote: »
    Looking for some advice from someone who knows about Kaffir Lime ( or just Lime) trees:
    s3KSgNx.jpg

    This is my Kaffir Lime tree - it's currently Winter, heading to spring, and you may notice something about this tree - roughly one third of it consists of what I want from the tree (delicious, delicious leaves) and two thirds consists of it trying to kill everything in its vague area, via impalement. Anyone have any tips on how to convince the tree to change these ratios? I need to weed under it ( difficult, because it penetrates all gloves and sleeves I throw at it), but I'm not sure why it hates all other life with quite the intensity it does.

    Is it grafted?

    Normally fruit trees are mutants that don't grow very well, so they are grafted onto a stronger base tree. If all goes well only the mutant grows above ground and the base grows the roots. (this is called a rootstock). What it looks like happened here is a the rootstock of a kaffir lime graft started sending out shoots, and trying to grow into a tree. This is bad as the rootstock has undesirable properties (like thorns and no tasty leaves) and is faster at growing. If you leave it the mutant graft will die off as it is not producing enough resources for the tree.

    Double check it is grafted. If it is, then cut all the thorny branches off as low as possible (they should all be sprouting below the kaffir section) and keep trimming back that which is not kaffir lime.

    As always, double check elsewhere online.

    In this moment, I am euphoric. Not because of any phony god’s blessing. But because, I am enlightened by my intelligence.
  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    By any chance, does anyone here have experience of growing wine cap mushrooms? Because I've been talking with a local mushroom guy and might just be getting into trying to cultivate a bed of them.

  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I'm thinking about turning part of my garage into a seedling station because the late summer fall heat is killing all my sprouts, does anyone have grow light suggestions?

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
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  • Amy5821Amy5821 USARegistered User new member
    Could you please give me advice on fertilizers? I'm not quite sure which to pick for hydrangeas.

    Thanks in advance

  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Hydrangeas - if you want them blue, keep the soil acidic. If you want them pink, let it go neutral/alkaline. An easy trick is to use pine needles or pine bark as mulch, which supplies the acid while also protecting the ground and moisture.

    As for fertilizer, some compost or something mixed in the soil before you mulch. Early spring is best; fertilizers added too late in the growing season just wash away, wasting your money and polluting the waterways.

  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    I built up a bunch of cheap raised beds at our new house, and had a lot of early success, but lately my poor plants have been beset by EVERYTHING.

    I wonder if using a bunch of bagged soil to fill them increased my risk of overwintered bugs, or if I should just expect a fight every year.

    Just in the bug department I’ve got:

    -squash bugs
    -cucumber beetles
    -squash borers
    -buffalo treehoppers
    -cabbageworms
    -tomato fruit worms

    Some of it was just being dumb, but I’m about to give up on Neem oil and go nuclear.

    Try to rotate your crops as much as possible, don't plant things in the same area, and ideally don't plant the same plants two years in a row. The latter is hard, but REALLY throws the targetted insects for a loop. If you can say, focus on squash, corn and peppers one year and then carrots, tomotoes and beans the next then it can really help keep harmful insect numbers down. However, it clearly sucks because you have to be so picky about what you grow.

    Definately rotate the crops though.

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
    Mayabird
  • AntinumericAntinumeric Registered User regular
    tbloxham wrote: »
    I built up a bunch of cheap raised beds at our new house, and had a lot of early success, but lately my poor plants have been beset by EVERYTHING.

    I wonder if using a bunch of bagged soil to fill them increased my risk of overwintered bugs, or if I should just expect a fight every year.

    Just in the bug department I’ve got:

    -squash bugs
    -cucumber beetles
    -squash borers
    -buffalo treehoppers
    -cabbageworms
    -tomato fruit worms

    Some of it was just being dumb, but I’m about to give up on Neem oil and go nuclear.

    Try to rotate your crops as much as possible, don't plant things in the same area, and ideally don't plant the same plants two years in a row. The latter is hard, but REALLY throws the targetted insects for a loop. If you can say, focus on squash, corn and peppers one year and then carrots, tomotoes and beans the next then it can really help keep harmful insect numbers down. However, it clearly sucks because you have to be so picky about what you grow.

    Definately rotate the crops though.

    We got stuck with something like this on our allotment - white rot on our onions and garlic. Renders the soil unusuable for *years*. Affects two of our beds now :( Same bed can grow squash and rocket no problem however, just shift focus and move on.

    In this moment, I am euphoric. Not because of any phony god’s blessing. But because, I am enlightened by my intelligence.
    MayabirdAbsoluteZero
  • AntoshkaAntoshka Miauen Oil Change LazarusRegistered User regular
    Antoshka wrote: »
    Looking for some advice from someone who knows about Kaffir Lime ( or just Lime) trees:
    s3KSgNx.jpg

    This is my Kaffir Lime tree - it's currently Winter, heading to spring, and you may notice something about this tree - roughly one third of it consists of what I want from the tree (delicious, delicious leaves) and two thirds consists of it trying to kill everything in its vague area, via impalement. Anyone have any tips on how to convince the tree to change these ratios? I need to weed under it ( difficult, because it penetrates all gloves and sleeves I throw at it), but I'm not sure why it hates all other life with quite the intensity it does.

    Is it grafted?

    In this case, no it is not grafted - however, in my looking, I found that the leaves were showing signs that the plant didn't have the nutrients it needed - not surprising, I guess, in a raised bed, so I went out and found some specialized citrus fertilizer to try. Few weeks later:
    M8HvxWj.jpg
    It still wants to kill everything, but it looks pretty (and smells amazing) while doing it.

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    AntinumericCalica
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I had given up on my tomatillos which were flowering all summer but didn't seem to be fruiting.

    Clearly something changed in the last 3 days:

    jZNVJUe.jpg

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Torchlight | Steam | ART
    MayabirdKamiroSoggybiscuitAntoshkaBullheadCalica
  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit At the edge of spacetime lies a path with no end.Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    I had given up on my tomatillos which were flowering all summer but didn't seem to be fruiting.

    Clearly something changed in the last 3 days:

    jZNVJUe.jpg

    Yeah mine did crap all during the summer as well. As soon as we got some rain the plants sprang to life and started producing.

    The sad part is I've let my garden grow over, so I could cut it all down and compost everything. Even my previous dormant tomatoes have come back to life. Months without rain makes for a sad gardener.

    Steam - Synthetic Violence | XBOX Live - Cannonfuse | PSN - CastleBravo | Twitch - SoggybiscuitPA
    Doodmann
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