The [Bread] Thread! A Thread all about Bread!

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  • UrielUriel Registered User regular
    edited June 2
    I wanna make some brioche

    Alas I don't think I've enough eggs or butter

    Or maybe I do? I think my butter is frozen though

    Uriel on
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    it was mostly cool.



    not the amount of bubbles I thought I'd have, but it's so very very good. and the crumb is right where I want it.


    Now, what do I do about the leftovers of previous loaves? They weren't quite amazing enough to finish. so I have some leftover. Would you suggest maybe making croutons? or breadcrumbs?

    PinfeldorftynicProlegomenahonovere
  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    Breadcrumbs freeze basically forever without compromising quality, so they're a great choice if you don't have any near-future crouton plans. Although it is French onion soup season down there, so there's that.

    Then again, you could always just deplete your butter and cinnamon stock and make bread pudding.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
    tynicV1m
  • PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Realtor Santa ClaritaRegistered User regular
    I love using leftover stale sourdough to make meatloaf.

  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    i just put a sourdough crumb cake in the oven with the discard, so doing that and bread pudding might be a stretch.

    so for breadcrumbs, do I just slice and let air dry for a day? do I dry them in the oven like I would croutons and then food process them?

    and when i have them crumbed, should i store them in a glass jar with some rice?

  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    Yup! Dry 'em for a day, tear 'em up, bake 'em for 20-30 minutes until crunchy. I used to just bash them up in a ziploc with a rolling pin and then put the ziploc in the freezer, but I imagine a food processor would work even better.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
    lonelyahava
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    My mother used to food process then freeze in ziplocks too. So that’s a second vote!

    lonelyahavawebguy203clipse
  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    edited June 6
    No knead white bread. 2 hour rise, 18 hours fridge. "00" type flour. Best looking loaf so far I think. Crust could've used a bit longer in the oven.
    98urr5jki6n5.jpg
    y8tpnu020xhy.jpg


    Edit: same dough, the other half, a day later.
    4s3vwwdf7za9.jpg
    7gn6j35pti9s.jpg

    honovere on
    3clipseTynnanThegreatcowwebguy20SilverWindlonelyahavaPeenbowen
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    I have made bagels!
    Sourdough Bagels!

    MUWAHAHAHAHAHA
    psqchycw3kz0.jpg
    tx7rn561rhmd.jpg
    8uicyuyb6bpj.jpg

    Jedocwebguy203clipseschusshonovereProlegomenabowenSilverWindPeen
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Yes please post me a bagel.

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    honovere
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    how about i give you recipe?

    https://littlespoonfarm.com/sourdough-bagels-recipe/

    Although be warned, when she mentions this is a stiff dough, it's a stiff dough. My little non-KA mixer struggled a lot with kneading the dough. I might recommend trying by hand, but that will get tiring.

    but the recipe was super easy and had weight measures as well a volume.

    tynicwebguy20
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Back in the bread game. Note my complete inability to portion with the bench knifes60qyrtoax7p.jpg

    3clipseBahamutZEROwebguy20TynnanhonovereProlegomenabowenPolaritiePeen
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    edited June 19
    So we went to my wife's family cabin for the weekend and there is just a treasure trove of weird old books that my wife's late bipolar hippy grandma collected and stashed up there and I always enjoy poking through them. Sometimes you find women's self help books from the 40s, sometimes you find memoirs of old white men on safari being spectacularly racist, sometimes you find wild health food cookbooks from the 1920s

    this time I found a book called Bread and Breadmaking by Sylvester Graham, originally published in 1837.
    There are probably few people in civilized life, who were the question put to them directly - would not say, that they consider bread one of the most, if not the most important article of diet which enters into the food of man. And yet there is, in reality, almost a total and universal carelessness about the character of bread. Thousands in civic life will, for years, and perhaps as long as they live, eat the most miserable trash that can be imagined, the the form of bread, and never seem to think that they can possibly have anything better, nor even that it is an evil to eat such stuff as they do. And if there is occasionally an individual who is troubled with some convictions that his bread is not quite what it should be, he knows no how to remedy the difficulty; for it is a serious truth, that, although nearly every human being in civilized life eats bread of some kind or other, yet scarcely any one has sufficient knowledge of the true principles and process concerned in bread making, and of the actual causes of the bad qualities of bread, to know how, with any degree of certainty, to avoid bad and secure good bread.

    I have thought, therefore, that I could hardly do society a better service, than to publish the following treatise on the subject which, whether people are aware of it or not, is, in reality, of very great importance to the health and comfort of every one.

    It has been prepared for the press with more haste under more embarrassments from other engagements, and with less severity of revision, than I could wish. Yet, whatever may be its defects of arrangement, method or style, I have taken care to have the principles correct, and the instructions such as, if attended to, will enable every one who is heartily devoted to the subject, to make good bread.

    Friends... it is a wild read. According to old Sly here, if people ate only fresh, uncooked, naturally occurring things in their natural state nobody would ever get sick for any reason. That every food on earth has a nutritious portion and a "bulk" portion, and to remove the bulk (which is to say refine foods) will make you "pale and droop and lose your worldly vigor". He believes the worst thing you can do for your teeth and your digestive system is eat HOT food.
    Hot substances taken into the mouth serve more directly and powerfully to destroy the teeth than any other cause which acts immediately upon them and hot food and drink received into the stomach always in some degree debilitate that organ and through it every other organ and portion of the whole system

    He goes on to call farmers of the time monsters for "over tilling" their soil, that wheat grown from "virgin soil" is the only real good stuff. Then he drags commercial bakers saying that their bread is ALWAYS trash, and usually full of chalk or other bulking agents. He says that every illness on earth could be cured if people ate whole grain bread they baked at home (and wouldn't you know it he's seen people with chronic disease cured every time within just a couple of weeks of eating whole wheat).

    But of course after a while it all comes around to how women are actually failing everyone and if mothers and wives just did their job the way they should then everyone would have good bread and be happy.
    could wives and mothers fully comprehend the importance of good bread in relation to all the bodily and intellectual and moral interests of their husbands and children, and in relation to the domestic and social and civil welfare of mankind, and to their religious prosperity, both for time and eternity, they would estimate the art and of bread making far very far more highly than they now do.

    So yeah, wives and mothers, hop to it and start milling wheat you grew from virgin soil so society will get better, sheesh
    You can read the whole thing here if you feel like it.

    #pipe on
    tynic3clipseBahamutZEROUrielJedocPeen
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    this guy sounds like he knows his stuff! Sign me up!

  • ProlegomenaProlegomena Frictionless Spinning The VoidRegistered User regular
    Ironically it sounds like there might be a useful nutritive portion of good information in that book, once you remove the bulk of dubious opinion/misogyny/etc.

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    It does sound like he’s advocating a high fiber diet somewhere in there

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    I made olive bread yesterday. Just the same normal white loaf I've made before but I mixed in a load of sliced black olives. It worked well, came out softer than usual which I wonder might be from the oil in the olives? Next time I think I need to put more in though because I just did it by eye and it looked like plenty but once the loaf rose the olives were pretty spaced out.

    tynicTynnanlonelyahava3clipsePeen
  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    #pipe wrote: »
    So we went to my wife's family cabin for the weekend and there is just a treasure trove of weird old books that my wife's late bipolar hippy grandma collected and stashed up there and I always enjoy poking through them. Sometimes you find women's self help books from the 40s, sometimes you find memoirs of old white men on safari being spectacularly racist, sometimes you find wild health food cookbooks from the 1920s

    this time I found a book called Bread and Breadmaking by Sylvester Graham, originally published in 1837.
    There are probably few people in civilized life, who were the question put to them directly - would not say, that they consider bread one of the most, if not the most important article of diet which enters into the food of man. And yet there is, in reality, almost a total and universal carelessness about the character of bread. Thousands in civic life will, for years, and perhaps as long as they live, eat the most miserable trash that can be imagined, the the form of bread, and never seem to think that they can possibly have anything better, nor even that it is an evil to eat such stuff as they do. And if there is occasionally an individual who is troubled with some convictions that his bread is not quite what it should be, he knows no how to remedy the difficulty; for it is a serious truth, that, although nearly every human being in civilized life eats bread of some kind or other, yet scarcely any one has sufficient knowledge of the true principles and process concerned in bread making, and of the actual causes of the bad qualities of bread, to know how, with any degree of certainty, to avoid bad and secure good bread.

    I have thought, therefore, that I could hardly do society a better service, than to publish the following treatise on the subject which, whether people are aware of it or not, is, in reality, of very great importance to the health and comfort of every one.

    It has been prepared for the press with more haste under more embarrassments from other engagements, and with less severity of revision, than I could wish. Yet, whatever may be its defects of arrangement, method or style, I have taken care to have the principles correct, and the instructions such as, if attended to, will enable every one who is heartily devoted to the subject, to make good bread.

    Friends... it is a wild read. According to old Sly here, if people ate only fresh, uncooked, naturally occurring things in their natural state nobody would ever get sick for any reason. That every food on earth has a nutritious portion and a "bulk" portion, and to remove the bulk (which is to say refine foods) will make you "pale and droop and lose your worldly vigor". He believes the worst thing you can do for your teeth and your digestive system is eat HOT food.
    Hot substances taken into the mouth serve more directly and powerfully to destroy the teeth than any other cause which acts immediately upon them and hot food and drink received into the stomach always in some degree debilitate that organ and through it every other organ and portion of the whole system

    He goes on to call farmers of the time monsters for "over tilling" their soil, that wheat grown from "virgin soil" is the only real good stuff. Then he drags commercial bakers saying that their bread is ALWAYS trash, and usually full of chalk or other bulking agents. He says that every illness on earth could be cured if people ate whole grain bread they baked at home (and wouldn't you know it he's seen people with chronic disease cured every time within just a couple of weeks of eating whole wheat).

    But of course after a while it all comes around to how women are actually failing everyone and if mothers and wives just did their job the way they should then everyone would have good bread and be happy.
    could wives and mothers fully comprehend the importance of good bread in relation to all the bodily and intellectual and moral interests of their husbands and children, and in relation to the domestic and social and civil welfare of mankind, and to their religious prosperity, both for time and eternity, they would estimate the art and of bread making far very far more highly than they now do.

    So yeah, wives and mothers, hop to it and start milling wheat you grew from virgin soil so society will get better, sheesh
    You can read the whole thing here if you feel like it.

    Oh cool, I was wondering who Pete Evan's great granddad was.

  • UrielUriel Registered User regular
    edited June 19
    Sylvester Graham was also the guy in the early temperance movement that thought all worldly pleasure is what caused all evil and illness right?

    Like he's the guy Graham crackers are named after.

    Oh yeah! I forgot. John Harvey Kellogg picked up a lot of his stuff later on and that dude was obsessed with bowel health to the extreme. Also a noted antimastabatory crusader.

    I bet they were fun at parties

    Uriel on
  • ThegreatcowThegreatcow Lord of All Bacons Washington State - It's Wet up here innit? Registered User regular
    Wooof...I completely borked it when I tried to make Babish’s sourdough. My guess is I either killed my starter somehow or one of the 12 bazillion knead rest cycles wasn’t enough and it. Didn’t aerate the dough or who knows. Frankly sourdough is too much a pain in the butt at this point for me to attempt it again. The starter does make good waffles though.

    But yeah, hail to my might flatbread on steroids yo!

    b0m7gn0ujlby.jpeg

    Jedoc
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Wooof...I completely borked it when I tried to make Babish’s sourdough. My guess is I either killed my starter somehow or one of the 12 bazillion knead rest cycles wasn’t enough and it. Didn’t aerate the dough or who knows. Frankly sourdough is too much a pain in the butt at this point for me to attempt it again. The starter does make good waffles though.

    But yeah, hail to my might flatbread on steroids yo!

    b0m7gn0ujlby.jpeg

    Mine started that way too!
    My tips -
    1. You only need to fold/turn 4-5 times.
    2. If you made your own starter and it isn't "frothy", add some commercial yeast (like an eighth of a teaspoon) during the initial mix. It took my starter ~3 weeks to really be well developed.
    3. Don't be afraid to deviate from recipes if you aren't getting the rise you expect. It sometimes takes longer. I'm looking at you Tartine directions.

  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    Man, if he thought farmers were over-tilling in 1837, he probably did not enjoy the coming decades. Farmers already thought the good soil was down deep, and plows were designed to flip a whole sheet of dirt over on its top, burying the topsoil and collapsing water-absorbing cavities.

    While this book was being written, John Deere was putting the finishing touches on the steel plow that would allow farmers to plough even deeper, until they were routinely burying topsoil under 18-24 inches of compacted subsoil.

    They got away with this for decades, just because the soil in the river valleys that supported early American agriculture was still that good even two feet down. But when they took these techniques to the Great Plains, they were digging up nearly-sterile hardpan and completely destroying the 4-6 inches of usable topsoil. Soil exhaustion, erosion, and the Dust Bowl followed.

    And I'm sure the ghost of Sylvester Graham was like "I told you! I told you fools about over-tilling! Stop cooking your food, assholes!"

    GDdCWMm.jpg
    tynicwebguy20
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    Uriel wrote: »
    Sylvester Graham was also the guy in the early temperance movement that thought all worldly pleasure is what caused all evil and illness right?

    Like he's the guy Graham crackers are named after.

    Oh yeah! I forgot. John Harvey Kellogg picked up a lot of his stuff later on and that dude was obsessed with bowel health to the extreme. Also a noted antimastabatory crusader.

    I bet they were fun at parties

    He did go on a big tirade about how you shouldn't get your yeast from brewers because they were hell children.

    Actually the fermentation section is hilarious because he has tips on how to make yeast

    And they're all like "mix up flour and water and cooked hops, then dump in a bunch of good yeast" like ?????????

    tynicwebguy20
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    JedocUrielTynnan
  • UrielUriel Registered User regular
    I really should buy a Pullman pan

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    #pipe wrote: »
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    In that 10 hours though it's just like 30 minutes of work. It's more a space issue than a time issue.

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  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    It's definitely a schedule issue. And a memory issue.

    Like I have my autolyse still sitting on the counter from yesterday. The levain is still waiting from two days ago. Because I got distracted and forgot them.

    I'm not every sure that I can use them and don't just need to start over.

  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    Wooof...I completely borked it when I tried to make Babish’s sourdough. My guess is I either killed my starter somehow or one of the 12 bazillion knead rest cycles wasn’t enough and it. Didn’t aerate the dough or who knows. Frankly sourdough is too much a pain in the butt at this point for me to attempt it again. The starter does make good waffles though.

    But yeah, hail to my might flatbread on steroids yo!

    b0m7gn0ujlby.jpeg

    That loaf shows classic signs of over-proofing (tight crumb with one giant bubble at the top). Try cutting down on the fold counts and rest time.

    schuss
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    In that 10 hours though it's just like 30 minutes of work. It's more a space issue than a time issue.

    It's a "this is my whole day" issue. It's that I can't really leave the house while it's happening. And it's also the fact that I won't have bread for ten hours.

  • PeenPeen tw1tch0rz occasionallyRegistered User regular
    I love eating sourdough bread. I love the idea of sourdough bread. I love the process of tenderly shepherding the loaf's components through the day until you end up with lovely bread.

    But then I look at how long all of that takes, and how long it takes with the yeast in my freezer, and I use the yeast and end up with lovely bread anyway. I salute the sourdough artisans of the world but it's not for me, most of the time.

    #pipe
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    #pipe wrote: »
    webguy20 wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    In that 10 hours though it's just like 30 minutes of work. It's more a space issue than a time issue.

    It's a "this is my whole day" issue. It's that I can't really leave the house while it's happening. And it's also the fact that I won't have bread for ten hours.

    Yeah... I dont think I'm ever going to try and do sourdough. Yeast, sure. I can spend an afternoon and knead up a nice loaf. Or, you know, just grab the baking powder and be done in <30m. Banana bread and such is still delicious.

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  • ShortyShorty JUDGE BROSEF Registered User regular
    you know I've been baking because the lady just asked me if I knew what the float test was and I said, "yeah, it's very useful" but it turns out she was talking about witches

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  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Polaritie wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    webguy20 wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    In that 10 hours though it's just like 30 minutes of work. It's more a space issue than a time issue.

    It's a "this is my whole day" issue. It's that I can't really leave the house while it's happening. And it's also the fact that I won't have bread for ten hours.

    Yeah... I dont think I'm ever going to try and do sourdough. Yeast, sure. I can spend an afternoon and knead up a nice loaf. Or, you know, just grab the baking powder and be done in <30m. Banana bread and such is still delicious.

    It's really not that bad.

    tynic
  • ThegreatcowThegreatcow Lord of All Bacons Washington State - It's Wet up here innit? Registered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Wooof...I completely borked it when I tried to make Babish’s sourdough. My guess is I either killed my starter somehow or one of the 12 bazillion knead rest cycles wasn’t enough and it. Didn’t aerate the dough or who knows. Frankly sourdough is too much a pain in the butt at this point for me to attempt it again. The starter does make good waffles though.

    But yeah, hail to my might flatbread on steroids yo!

    b0m7gn0ujlby.jpeg

    That loaf shows classic signs of over-proofing (tight crumb with one giant bubble at the top). Try cutting down on the fold counts and rest time.

    Cheers, that at least gives me insight into what went wrong. Thanks for the info.

  • SilverWindSilverWind Registered User regular
    For those of you using razor blades / lames, how many times do you reuse your razor (say, per corner) before replacing it? I use it twice per corner, for the two loaves I bake at a time, but I can't help feeling somewhat wasteful

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  • PeenPeen tw1tch0rz occasionallyRegistered User regular
    I want to try this very, very soon.

  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    webguy20 wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    In that 10 hours though it's just like 30 minutes of work. It's more a space issue than a time issue.

    It's a "this is my whole day" issue. It's that I can't really leave the house while it's happening. And it's also the fact that I won't have bread for ten hours.

    Yeah... I dont think I'm ever going to try and do sourdough. Yeast, sure. I can spend an afternoon and knead up a nice loaf. Or, you know, just grab the baking powder and be done in <30m. Banana bread and such is still delicious.

    It's really not that bad.

    I mean, it actually is. I like making sourdough, but the past couple of weekends I’ve taken my starter out to make the levian and just end up with a massive pile of starter and no bread because life gets in the way. It’s not like exhausting or anything, but there are a bunch of tasks and it stops me from, going to see friends, going to the shops, walking the dog, or letting the wife have a nap because I have to watch the baby.

    My favourite quote about sourdough is brad’s “why doesn’t sourdough cost like, thirty dollars” because while it isn’t a massive amount of active time, it’s a massive time of where you have to be home doing shit.

    #pipeShortylonelyahava
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    SilverWind wrote: »
    For those of you using razor blades / lames, how many times do you reuse your razor (say, per corner) before replacing it? I use it twice per corner, for the two loaves I bake at a time, but I can't help feeling somewhat wasteful

    just...

    just wipe it and reuse it until it doesn't cut clean anymore.

    I use razor blades on my FACE like 10 times before I replace them.

    ShortyTynnanwebguy203clipsetynicschussLaOs
  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    Of all the things to cut with a razor, strands of gluten and bits of wet starch are pretty unlikely to dull the blade. Just clean it and store it dry.

    Shortywebguy203clipsetynicschuss
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Blake T wrote: »
    schuss wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    webguy20 wrote: »
    #pipe wrote: »
    In other news I made a loaf of yeast Pullman today and it was so quick and easy that I'm officially retiring fr sourdough.

    Sourdough is good, unquestionably. But it takes like 10 hours to make a loaf of bread, and with yeast it takes two. It's good, but it's not five times as good.

    In that 10 hours though it's just like 30 minutes of work. It's more a space issue than a time issue.

    It's a "this is my whole day" issue. It's that I can't really leave the house while it's happening. And it's also the fact that I won't have bread for ten hours.

    Yeah... I dont think I'm ever going to try and do sourdough. Yeast, sure. I can spend an afternoon and knead up a nice loaf. Or, you know, just grab the baking powder and be done in <30m. Banana bread and such is still delicious.

    It's really not that bad.

    I mean, it actually is. I like making sourdough, but the past couple of weekends I’ve taken my starter out to make the levian and just end up with a massive pile of starter and no bread because life gets in the way. It’s not like exhausting or anything, but there are a bunch of tasks and it stops me from, going to see friends, going to the shops, walking the dog, or letting the wife have a nap because I have to watch the baby.

    My favourite quote about sourdough is brad’s “why doesn’t sourdough cost like, thirty dollars” because while it isn’t a massive amount of active time, it’s a massive time of where you have to be home doing shit.

    Eh, feed the levain - once/twice a day. Takes 2-3 minutes.
    Mix primary dough - 5 minutes for mix. Have to be in the area for the next 45 for the autolyse to complete and mix in the salt/initial. Then you just have to be kinda nearby for at least 2-3 of the next 6 hours for at least 3 folds. If you did your stuff mid-day, you can now just spend 10-15 mins shaping and toss it in the fridge overnight. Then an hour or so early morning baking it (which again, is only a few minutes here and there of active work).
    It's inconvenient, but not that bad if you line it up with a workday or something (since many of us are still WFH).

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