[Hiberno-Britannic Politics] Let’s Do The Lockdown Again

18889919394100

Posts

  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited October 19


    I wonder if Sturgeon will pull the trigger on this as well.

    Bogart on
  • HerrCronHerrCron It that wickedly supports taxation Registered User regular
    Whelp - as predicted six weeks of level five restrictions in Ireland, as of Wednesday, announced with a hint of "if ye fuck this up, there'll be no Christmas for anyone"

    Overview of restrictions here but some highlights
    Can't go more than 5km from home
    Social visits not allowed
    WFH if possible
    Schools to remain open
    Pubs to close, restaurants to do takeaway only

    sig.gif
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    HerrCron wrote: »
    Whelp - as predicted six weeks of level five restrictions in Ireland, as of Wednesday, announced with a hint of "if ye fuck this up, there'll be no Christmas for anyone"

    Overview of restrictions here but some highlights
    Can't go more than 5km from home
    Social visits not allowed
    WFH if possible
    Schools to remain open
    Pubs to close, restaurants to do takeaway only

    Sounds like a good package of measures, lets hope it is effective. Israel seems to be showing that strict measures still work, even if the population is exhausted.

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
  • japanjapan Registered User regular


    Signs of panic?
    Continuing to dismiss Scottish calls for another independence vote outright could be “counterproductive,” the memo said. Possible counter-measures include London handing more power to Edinburgh and ratifying a new settlement through a popular vote, and pressuring the European Union to nix the idea of Scotland rejoining the bloc as an independent country.

    Yeah good luck with that
    Another option set out in the memo would be to prepare a new constitutional plan ready to roll out in case of an SNP victory in May. These measures could eventually be ratified via a referendum as a “placation” against the SNP’s demands for an independence vote, the document says.

    Oh look, it's the electoral reform referendum game plan

  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    They’re just so fucking dumb about Scottish independence. You’re the main reason it’s surging, you useless fucks.

    JazzShadowenBethrynmonikerCasualDoodmanndanxCommander ZoomaltidBrovid HasselsmofPolaritieAntoshkaFencingsaxTicaldfjamSkeithLordSolarMachariusRhesus PositiveGnome-InterruptustzeentchlingSolarSporkAndrewLord_AsmodeusMorganVGiantGeek2020Zilla360boogedybooJaysonFour
  • CasualCasual Wiggle Wiggle Wiggle Flap Flap Flap Registered User regular
    I'd love to see what the Tories think they can offer Scotland that would match being shot of them forever.

    And yes, lol at the idea of pressuring the EU to act against their own interests.

    i write amazing erotic fiction

    its all about anthropomorphic dicks doing everyday things like buying shoes for their scrotum-feet
    Winky wrote: »
    Corgis are totally the white people of dogs
    Kayne Red RobeJazzAntinumericGiantGeek2020
  • CasualCasual Wiggle Wiggle Wiggle Flap Flap Flap Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    They’re just so fucking dumb about Scottish independence. You’re the main reason it’s surging, you useless fucks.

    It is interesting they've realised dismissal isn't going to work. We're past denial and onto bargaining. Is acceptance on the horizon?

    i write amazing erotic fiction

    its all about anthropomorphic dicks doing everyday things like buying shoes for their scrotum-feet
    Winky wrote: »
    Corgis are totally the white people of dogs
    Kayne Red Robe
  • danxdanx Registered User regular
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

  • M-VickersM-Vickers Registered User regular
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    Commander ZoomGiantGeek2020
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    So...can't any EU member veto a new member state? Do the ex-UK members have to draw lots to see which of them gets to tell Britain they can't join? Maybe a rugby tournament or something?

  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    Don't forget the Free City of Greater London.

    steam_sig.png
    Steam, Warframe: Megajoule
  • TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    Don't forget the Free City of Greater London.

    ...and surrounds, don't leave us fenland dwellers alone surrounded by the barbarians! Second only to Scotland I thought?

    Jazz
  • M-VickersM-Vickers Registered User regular
    Tastyfish wrote: »
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    Don't forget the Free City of Greater London.

    ...and surrounds, don't leave us fenland dwellers alone surrounded by the barbarians! Second only to Scotland I thought?

    Maybe Scotland will conquer the North before they leave, take us with them.

    “Well if you don’t want them, we’ll have them.”

    I, for one, would welcome our Scottish overlords.

    SolarSporkAndrewGiantGeek2020pezgen
  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    So...can't any EU member veto a new member state? Do the ex-UK members have to draw lots to see which of them gets to tell Britain they can't join? Maybe a rugby tournament or something?

    They make it the theme of that year's Eurovision

    tzeentchlingRingoMojo_JojoJazzShadowenDevoutlyApathetic
  • Dis'Dis' Registered User regular
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    Tastyfish wrote: »
    M-Vickers wrote: »
    danx wrote: »
    If any of those 'constitutional reforms' require consent of the rest of the UKs populace that referendum could get real awkward.

    It would be painfully ironic if Brexit, the basic concept being the the UK doesn’t need the EU, could lead to the UK splitting up, and everyone except England rejoining the EU as sovereign nations.

    How could England, as a country, possibly survive being surrounded by EU member states ?

    Extra bonus irony points if, in a few decades, a party gets to power based on a policy of applying to join the EU.

    Don't forget the Free City of Greater London.

    ...and surrounds, don't leave us fenland dwellers alone surrounded by the barbarians! Second only to Scotland I thought?

    Maybe Scotland will conquer the North before they leave, take us with them.

    “Well if you don’t want them, we’ll have them.”

    I, for one, would welcome our Scottish overlords.

    Scotland taking the north would kind of defeat the point of independence for self determination: depending on your definition of the 'North' its between 0.7 and 3 times Scotland's population and would dominate the new country :D.

  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck lonely, but not unloved dreaming of faulty keys and latchesRegistered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    Casual wrote: »
    If we end up with no deal and no agreements will we be breaking any laws? Genuine question, I have no idea how this works. My understanding was no deal was throwing everything in the bin, starting from scratch and making it all up as we go along.

    we wont end up with no deal and no agreements because, in practice, what we are heading for is a very very "thin" deal - and then a series of desperate negotiations for piecemeal fixes of the most obviously disastrous elements (partly because some of this stuff is things like coordination and standards issues that aren't really that contentious)

    Notwithstanding the non-contentious nature of some of it, I'm still kind of blown away by the number of people who aren't really grasping how significant a lot of this stuff is, and that the problems generated by knocking all of the existing regulatory infrastructure away get really complicated, really fast

    Like, Reporting Scotland had a piece on exporting potatoes the other day, because it's a big market for Ayrshire and most of their production goes to the EU. As things stand, growers don't know that they will be able to state as of January the 1st whether their product has been produced according to the relevant EU standards. Technically they have, because the regulatory agencies in the UK enforce standards aligned to the EU's. But if those regulatory agencies are no longer recognised by the EU, it isn't clear whether the growers can produce the evidence required to satisfy the resultant phytosanitary checks that the potatoes are now subject to. In principle a grower could, whatever the regulatory regime in the UK, continue to produce according to EU standards - but there's no guarantee that any EU body will recognise that, especially given that there would be no mechanism of recourse or enforcement for that body absent an agreement to implement that in domestic law (such as through a trade agreement).

    Even if there is relatively rapid agreement on things like this, there's still a lot of scope for timing issues to put a lot of companies out of business while they wait for recognition to kick in.

    as an addendum to this: it is worth noting that both gov and eu have, sotto voce, already given up (albeit the eu because they know we are not serious)

    the govs main goal is in presenting an acceptable pr presentation - mainly revolving around the oft-repeated conservativehome line that the eu are being "difficult" and their "peculiar" approach to negotiations has made a deal impossible - and to show whatever incredibly minor and thin nonsense we get as being a victory that we won due to our willingness to play hardball and threaten them with the economic warfare of no deal

    this is the biggest abdication of policy responsibility we have seen in the last 100 years of british political life but its a fait accompli at this point. coronavirus is a useful sideshow

    this is partly reflected in the increasingly unserious nonsense being trotted out in parliament - cf gove saying that a no deal would give us "new opportunities" for security cooperation with the eu, to theresa mays obvious disbelief - and partly in the complete refusal to talk about any concrete benefits. i havent really been posting much because theres nothing to say; the lords can have some minor influence but unless something surprising happens we are at this point simply discussing the size and consistency of the inveitable shitshow

    obF2Wuw.png
    SolarjapanJazzRhesus PositiveAntinumericFencingsaxLord_AsmodeusCasualShadowenautono-wally, erotibot300BogartSporkAndrewaltidBethrynBurnagemonikertzeentchlingZilla360
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    Len McCluskey was on Newsnight last night to tell Peter Mandelson (of Jewish heritage) to "go into a room and count his gold", just to keep everyone updated on whether Big Len has learned to shut the fuck up yet and have a little think about things.

    Particularly ironic considering the vast wodge of cash McCluskey has wrung out of his position.

    SolarSporkAndrewJazzaltidBethrynmonikertynicGiantGeek2020Zilla360Lord_Asmodeus
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Len McCluskey is scum. I truly do hate that man. He just uses the union as a personal expenses bank, and to solidify his own influence, and he's an anti-semite and he's well known to be a nasty bit of work in the Labour party too

    altid
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    Casual wrote: »
    If we end up with no deal and no agreements will we be breaking any laws? Genuine question, I have no idea how this works. My understanding was no deal was throwing everything in the bin, starting from scratch and making it all up as we go along.

    we wont end up with no deal and no agreements because, in practice, what we are heading for is a very very "thin" deal - and then a series of desperate negotiations for piecemeal fixes of the most obviously disastrous elements (partly because some of this stuff is things like coordination and standards issues that aren't really that contentious)

    Notwithstanding the non-contentious nature of some of it, I'm still kind of blown away by the number of people who aren't really grasping how significant a lot of this stuff is, and that the problems generated by knocking all of the existing regulatory infrastructure away get really complicated, really fast

    Like, Reporting Scotland had a piece on exporting potatoes the other day, because it's a big market for Ayrshire and most of their production goes to the EU. As things stand, growers don't know that they will be able to state as of January the 1st whether their product has been produced according to the relevant EU standards. Technically they have, because the regulatory agencies in the UK enforce standards aligned to the EU's. But if those regulatory agencies are no longer recognised by the EU, it isn't clear whether the growers can produce the evidence required to satisfy the resultant phytosanitary checks that the potatoes are now subject to. In principle a grower could, whatever the regulatory regime in the UK, continue to produce according to EU standards - but there's no guarantee that any EU body will recognise that, especially given that there would be no mechanism of recourse or enforcement for that body absent an agreement to implement that in domestic law (such as through a trade agreement).

    Even if there is relatively rapid agreement on things like this, there's still a lot of scope for timing issues to put a lot of companies out of business while they wait for recognition to kick in.

    as an addendum to this: it is worth noting that both gov and eu have, sotto voce, already given up (albeit the eu because they know we are not serious)

    the govs main goal is in presenting an acceptable pr presentation - mainly revolving around the oft-repeated conservativehome line that the eu are being "difficult" and their "peculiar" approach to negotiations has made a deal impossible - and to show whatever incredibly minor and thin nonsense we get as being a victory that we won due to our willingness to play hardball and threaten them with the economic warfare of no deal

    this is the biggest abdication of policy responsibility we have seen in the last 100 years of british political life but its a fait accompli at this point. coronavirus is a useful sideshow

    this is partly reflected in the increasingly unserious nonsense being trotted out in parliament - cf gove saying that a no deal would give us "new opportunities" for security cooperation with the eu, to theresa mays obvious disbelief - and partly in the complete refusal to talk about any concrete benefits. i havent really been posting much because theres nothing to say; the lords can have some minor influence but unless something surprising happens we are at this point simply discussing the size and consistency of the inveitable shitshow

    So the government is not doing enough (or anything) to get a deal while pretending that things are fine which limits their and everyone else in the UK's efforts to prepare for a Jan 1 crash out.

    Shut up, Mr. Burton! You were not brought upon this world to get it!
  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck lonely, but not unloved dreaming of faulty keys and latchesRegistered User regular
    daveNYC wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    Casual wrote: »
    If we end up with no deal and no agreements will we be breaking any laws? Genuine question, I have no idea how this works. My understanding was no deal was throwing everything in the bin, starting from scratch and making it all up as we go along.

    we wont end up with no deal and no agreements because, in practice, what we are heading for is a very very "thin" deal - and then a series of desperate negotiations for piecemeal fixes of the most obviously disastrous elements (partly because some of this stuff is things like coordination and standards issues that aren't really that contentious)

    Notwithstanding the non-contentious nature of some of it, I'm still kind of blown away by the number of people who aren't really grasping how significant a lot of this stuff is, and that the problems generated by knocking all of the existing regulatory infrastructure away get really complicated, really fast

    Like, Reporting Scotland had a piece on exporting potatoes the other day, because it's a big market for Ayrshire and most of their production goes to the EU. As things stand, growers don't know that they will be able to state as of January the 1st whether their product has been produced according to the relevant EU standards. Technically they have, because the regulatory agencies in the UK enforce standards aligned to the EU's. But if those regulatory agencies are no longer recognised by the EU, it isn't clear whether the growers can produce the evidence required to satisfy the resultant phytosanitary checks that the potatoes are now subject to. In principle a grower could, whatever the regulatory regime in the UK, continue to produce according to EU standards - but there's no guarantee that any EU body will recognise that, especially given that there would be no mechanism of recourse or enforcement for that body absent an agreement to implement that in domestic law (such as through a trade agreement).

    Even if there is relatively rapid agreement on things like this, there's still a lot of scope for timing issues to put a lot of companies out of business while they wait for recognition to kick in.

    as an addendum to this: it is worth noting that both gov and eu have, sotto voce, already given up (albeit the eu because they know we are not serious)

    the govs main goal is in presenting an acceptable pr presentation - mainly revolving around the oft-repeated conservativehome line that the eu are being "difficult" and their "peculiar" approach to negotiations has made a deal impossible - and to show whatever incredibly minor and thin nonsense we get as being a victory that we won due to our willingness to play hardball and threaten them with the economic warfare of no deal

    this is the biggest abdication of policy responsibility we have seen in the last 100 years of british political life but its a fait accompli at this point. coronavirus is a useful sideshow

    this is partly reflected in the increasingly unserious nonsense being trotted out in parliament - cf gove saying that a no deal would give us "new opportunities" for security cooperation with the eu, to theresa mays obvious disbelief - and partly in the complete refusal to talk about any concrete benefits. i havent really been posting much because theres nothing to say; the lords can have some minor influence but unless something surprising happens we are at this point simply discussing the size and consistency of the inveitable shitshow

    So the government is not doing enough (or anything) to get a deal while pretending that things are fine which limits their and everyone else in the UK's efforts to prepare for a Jan 1 crash out.

    there is no deal with any serious upside possible. given what they have said, their vulnerability to what they perceive as the political necessity of certain aspects of brexit both in the party base and in their voter base and the basic problems they need to solve their choice was always a humiliating collapse to some kind of status quo extension or an euino, or something like what is happening now

    obF2Wuw.png
    tynicCommander Zoom
  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    edited October 20
    Johnson is having a presser in a few minutes to point fingers at Andy Burnham after talks broke down, and probably pifflepafflewifflewaffle a bit about Manchester.

    Jazz on
    altid
  • klemmingklemming Registered User regular
    I'm guessing "You lot wouldn't vote for me anyway, so I don't really care" probably won't be said out loud, but I bet he'll be thinking it.

    Nobody remembers the singer. The song remains.
    Commander ZoomLiiyaFencingsaxCasualJazzSporkAndrew
  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    So, tier 3, no shock there, and Johnson refuses to specify how much support the region will get because he's a fucking shitheel.

    tynic
  • LiiyaLiiya Registered User regular
    The hate for the government here in Manchester is palpable - I very much hope it results in some real political change.

    SharpyVIItynicJazzSporkAndrewSolarRingo
  • eEK!eEK! Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    Len McCluskey was on Newsnight last night to tell Peter Mandelson (of Jewish heritage) to "go into a room and count his gold", just to keep everyone updated on whether Big Len has learned to shut the fuck up yet and have a little think about things.

    Particularly ironic considering the vast wodge of cash McCluskey has wrung out of his position.

    You're right that gobshite Len needs to get lost, but Mandelson is an infamous and toxic crook, so I don't agree this particular statement is incorrect.

  • Slacker1913Slacker1913 Registered User regular
    eEK! wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    Len McCluskey was on Newsnight last night to tell Peter Mandelson (of Jewish heritage) to "go into a room and count his gold", just to keep everyone updated on whether Big Len has learned to shut the fuck up yet and have a little think about things.

    Particularly ironic considering the vast wodge of cash McCluskey has wrung out of his position.

    You're right that gobshite Len needs to get lost, but Mandelson is an infamous and toxic crook, so I don't agree this particular statement is incorrect.

    "Go into your room and count your gold." is incorrect and antisemitic.
    "Go into your room and count your money." would not be and still carry the same meaning.

    Eh, I'll get around to it.
    Kipling217
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    eEK! wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    Len McCluskey was on Newsnight last night to tell Peter Mandelson (of Jewish heritage) to "go into a room and count his gold", just to keep everyone updated on whether Big Len has learned to shut the fuck up yet and have a little think about things.

    Particularly ironic considering the vast wodge of cash McCluskey has wrung out of his position.

    You're right that gobshite Len needs to get lost, but Mandelson is an infamous and toxic crook, so I don't agree this particular statement is incorrect.

    "Go into your room and count your gold." is incorrect and antisemitic.
    "Go into your room and count your money." would not be and still carry the same meaning.

    I would say that perhaps its best to just find non financial related insults for people of Jewish Heritage.

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
    Rhesus PositiveShadowenSlacker1913Kayne Red RobeGiantGeek2020
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    It’s not that Mandelson isn’t rich or a good person who shouldn’t ever be insulted, it’s that the very specific imagery McCluskey used is exactly the sort of shit he shouldn’t be saying to someone of Jewish heritage. Especially given Labour’s recent *ahem* troubles.

    monikerPhoenix-DklemmingShadowenCommander ZoomZilla360tynicLord_AsmodeusDevoutlyApatheticJazzFencingsaxtzeentchlingSporkAndrewSolarKayne Red RobeMild ConfusionRingoGiantGeek2020
  • CasualCasual Wiggle Wiggle Wiggle Flap Flap Flap Registered User regular
    tbloxham wrote: »
    eEK! wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    Len McCluskey was on Newsnight last night to tell Peter Mandelson (of Jewish heritage) to "go into a room and count his gold", just to keep everyone updated on whether Big Len has learned to shut the fuck up yet and have a little think about things.

    Particularly ironic considering the vast wodge of cash McCluskey has wrung out of his position.

    You're right that gobshite Len needs to get lost, but Mandelson is an infamous and toxic crook, so I don't agree this particular statement is incorrect.

    "Go into your room and count your gold." is incorrect and antisemitic.
    "Go into your room and count your money." would not be and still carry the same meaning.

    I would say that perhaps its best to just find non financial related insults for people of Jewish Heritage.

    Or just call him a crook. That's fine.

    i write amazing erotic fiction

    its all about anthropomorphic dicks doing everyday things like buying shoes for their scrotum-feet
    Winky wrote: »
    Corgis are totally the white people of dogs
    HerrCrontynicSlacker1913Lord_AsmodeusDevoutlyApatheticJazzFencingsaxSolarRingoGiantGeek2020
  • VermillionPeaceVermillionPeace Registered User regular
    Liiya wrote: »
    The hate for the government here in Manchester is palpable - I very much hope it results in some real political change.

    God forbid the Government protect people from Coronavirus, other parts of the country certainly haven't made as much a spectacle as in Manchester. Anyway its just Burnham's bid for Labour Party leader.



  • SharpyVIISharpyVII Registered User regular
    Liiya wrote: »
    The hate for the government here in Manchester is palpable - I very much hope it results in some real political change.

    God forbid the Government protect people from Coronavirus, other parts of the country certainly haven't made as much a spectacle as in Manchester. Anyway its just Burnham's bid for Labour Party leader.

    Nope!

    It's because the government wasn't offering nearly enough financial support!

    Hardly protecting people if they're going to be impoverished as a result. Burnham was asking for peanuts compared to what the government has wasted on track and trace and handing out to their mates via uncontested PPE contracts.

    autono-wally, erotibot300SporkAndrewSolarCasualLord_Asmodeus
  • VermillionPeaceVermillionPeace Registered User regular
    SharpyVII wrote: »
    It's because the government wasn't offering nearly enough financial support!

    22 million isn't peanuts. Compare it to other places given support and you will find it is at the high end for support. If Manchester hasn't got enough money already then it has bigger problems than coronavirus.

  • SharpyVIISharpyVII Registered User regular
    edited October 21
    SharpyVII wrote: »
    It's because the government wasn't offering nearly enough financial support!

    22 million isn't peanuts. Compare it to other places given support and you will find it is at the high end for support. If Manchester hasn't got enough money already then it has bigger problems than coronavirus.

    Ah yes a quid or two per person is really gonna make things better....

    Liverpool was offered a much higher package of support despite having a smaller population.

    And it really is when £12 billion was spent of track and trace.

    Like I don't know what else to tell you really.

    SharpyVII on
    autono-wally, erotibot300JaysonFourmonikerMild ConfusionRingoLord_Asmodeus
  • ZiggymonZiggymon Registered User regular
    SharpyVII wrote: »
    It's because the government wasn't offering nearly enough financial support!

    22 million isn't peanuts. Compare it to other places given support and you will find it is at the high end for support. If Manchester hasn't got enough money already then it has bigger problems than coronavirus.

    The government gave twice that to Lancashire with less than half the population, Lancashire also was put into Tier 3 lockdown, but then had different restrictions to Liverpool and now Manchester. But then again the majority of Lancashire MPs are Conservative..

    Manchester and many northern regions have had to have regional restrictions, some worse than tier 2 and 3 and have only seen the result be businesses destroyed and high unemployment rates. This is what drains areas financially.

    Bolton an area that was put into the same strict measures as Tier 3 for a considerable time now (simply due to a single person breaking the rules). The measures didn't have the affect desired and just left more businesses destroyed people unemployed and in a number of scientific model studies actually helped to increase the spread.

    This comes on the backdrop of both the official government scientific advice and independent advice both stating that the tier system will no reduct the R rate below 1. A national lockdown is still needed regardless of how many areas go into tier 3.

    Then Look at London, where despite all breaking of covid rules going on mysteriously was left into tier 1, begged by the mayor to go into tier 2 as the rates of infection have increased at a rate faster than Liverpool and Manchester combined. Has had countless cases from whistleblowers stating that the statistics of recording cases in London have been told to be massaged and recorded different to Northern regions to keep numbers looking low despite hospitals now struggling. Then the mayor realising that tier 2 means a 10pm curfew for pubs and bars now wants those lifted as its devastating businesses in the area something all other regions have had to endure without support.

    This is simply a tactic to ensure that when the shit hits the fan for the southern regions the magic money tree will grant those regions with a financial package of billions that will All end up being granted to private tory donors and friends.

    Manchester, its mayor and council leaders have done everything right. The tier system is flawed and targets the most vulnerable. There needed to be a better system that was either applied to all in the same way or scrapped for all.


    I have REZ for the Dreamcast PAL for sale £35. Other Excellent retro games for sale PM for details
    SharpyVIIAlphaRomeroSporkAndrewCasualmonikerLord_Asmodeus
  • SharpyVIISharpyVII Registered User regular
    edited October 21
    Another example is Newark in northern Nottinghamshire has a rescue package worth around £210 per head if it goes in to tier 3, which is over ten times what was offered to Manchester.

    Guess which party the MP for Newark belongs to?

    SharpyVII on
    moniker
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    Geth, kick @VermillionPeace from the thread.

  • GethGeth Legion Perseus VeilRegistered User, Moderator, Penny Arcade Staff, Vanilla Staff vanilla
    Affirmative Bogart. @VermillionPeace banned from this thread.

  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    Obvious troll is obvious.

    Red or Aliveautono-wally, erotibot300Commander ZoomSkeithDark Raven XTicaldfjamJazzSolaraltidmonikerjmcdonaldQanamilMild ConfusiontynicAegisRingoMartini_PhilosopherLord_Asmodeus
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    South Yorkshire is getting the tier 3 treatment next.

This discussion has been closed.