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[Homeowner/House] Thread. How long is it going to take? Two weeks!

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Posts

  • SniperGuySniperGuy SniperGuyGaming Registered User regular
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    Define "cheap" and "super tiny". I would recommend looking at electric mowers - they're a lot less messy and noxious than the traditional 2 stroke engine models.

    Hopefully 100 dollarish range rather than 250+

    Super tiny as in I am positive it'll take like 10 minutes max even with a pretty small mower.

    Twitch Streaming basically all week
    SniperGuyGaming on PSN / SniperGuy710 on Xbone Live
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    Define "cheap" and "super tiny". I would recommend looking at electric mowers - they're a lot less messy and noxious than the traditional 2 stroke engine models.

    Hopefully 100 dollarish range rather than 250+

    Super tiny as in I am positive it'll take like 10 minutes max even with a pretty small mower.

    At that small, it may be worth just investing in a larger electric trimmer.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    Define "cheap" and "super tiny". I would recommend looking at electric mowers - they're a lot less messy and noxious than the traditional 2 stroke engine models.

    Hopefully 100 dollarish range rather than 250+

    Super tiny as in I am positive it'll take like 10 minutes max even with a pretty small mower.

    Oh for that small then get a plug in mower?

    AiouaElvenshae
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    Define "cheap" and "super tiny". I would recommend looking at electric mowers - they're a lot less messy and noxious than the traditional 2 stroke engine models.

    Hopefully 100 dollarish range rather than 250+

    Super tiny as in I am positive it'll take like 10 minutes max even with a pretty small mower.

    Oh for that small then get a plug in mower?

    No - that small, you can just use a trimmer to cut it - this is how grounds crews handle medians and other odd shaped small bits of lawn.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited August 12
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    When we bought our house forever ago we picked up a cheap little Toro lawnmower. It doesn't have a lot of power and can get bogged down on wet or damp grass, but, we've kicked the shit out of that little mower and it's still chugging along after all these years. Now we just use it to trim the stuff our riding mower can't get to, but I'm still impressed it starts right up every season considering how neglected it is.

    Edit: Just saw your budget a few posts back and even the cheapest Toro probably won't fit that, so nevermind!

    AbsoluteZero on
    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    https://snowjoe.com/products/sun-joe-14-inch-12-amp-electric-lawn-mower

    I picked that thing up 3 years ago on sale from Amazon for ~$100 canadian, so US price and availability may vary. But as far as small/cheap/electric goes, it does the job well enough. Something I'll warn about when you get into electric mowers that small though, 12 amps is not a lot of power. When the bag gets full the clipping start to get in the way of the blade, and it'll lose power and seize up. It can also happen if I'm going through an extremely thick patch of grass, or if the grass is damp (learned that lesson the hard way). Basically if I'm not careful, I have to flip the thing over and clear out the clump, or if I hear the motor start to struggle, then I slow down and tip the mower up a bit to give the blade some air to spin.

    If any of that sound like a hassle to you, then you'll probably want to get something with some more oomph than 12 amps. Really for me it just serves as a reminder that I either need to empty the bag, or to stop being lazy and mow the lawn earlier.

    "The sausage of Green Earth explodes with flavor like the cannon of culinary delight."
    PSN: TheWolfman64 3DS/Pokemon Y: 0774-4614-4065/NNID: the_wolfman64
    QanamilPailryderElvenshae
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited August 12
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    I use a push reel mower and it works great for my small city lawn, and is perfect since it takes up next to no space in the garage like an electric/gas mower would. The key is that the cutting bar needs to be tensioned properly to cut well. It's a super simple adjustment that should take about a minute with a screwdriver or pliers. It shouldn't be too tight or the reel won't spin well, and shouldn't be too far away or grass will just slip through without being cut. Just play with tension it until it starts to cut paper inserted between the reel blades and the cutting bar.

    Simpsonia on
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited August 12
    https://snowjoe.com/products/sun-joe-14-inch-12-amp-electric-lawn-mower

    I picked that thing up 3 years ago on sale from Amazon for ~$100 canadian, so US price and availability may vary. But as far as small/cheap/electric goes, it does the job well enough. Something I'll warn about when you get into electric mowers that small though, 12 amps is not a lot of power. When the bag gets full the clipping start to get in the way of the blade, and it'll lose power and seize up. It can also happen if I'm going through an extremely thick patch of grass, or if the grass is damp (learned that lesson the hard way). Basically if I'm not careful, I have to flip the thing over and clear out the clump, or if I hear the motor start to struggle, then I slow down and tip the mower up a bit to give the blade some air to spin.

    If any of that sound like a hassle to you, then you'll probably want to get something with some more oomph than 12 amps. Really for me it just serves as a reminder that I either need to empty the bag, or to stop being lazy and mow the lawn earlier.

    It's $104 at Lowes, or $120 direct from Mr?. Joe.

    Also thanks a lot. :) Looking at this, i saw a sale on electronic door locks and been wanting one for our garage. So that's now ordered...

    MichaelLC on
    Elvenshae
  • MadpoetMadpoet Registered User regular
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have recommendations for a decent cheap lawn mower? Our lawn is super tiny but the reel mower that came with the house isn't cutting it, no pun intended.

    Define "cheap" and "super tiny". I would recommend looking at electric mowers - they're a lot less messy and noxious than the traditional 2 stroke engine models.

    Hopefully 100 dollarish range rather than 250+

    Super tiny as in I am positive it'll take like 10 minutes max even with a pretty small mower.

    At that small, it may be worth just investing in a larger electric trimmer.

    I went that route since I was already in the Ego ecosystem and my 10x20 lawn didn't warrant the garage space for a full blown lawnmower. It's a little awkward, but gets the job done. They have one now that has interchangeable heads, so it can be a trimmer, edger, or chain-glaive.

    Elvenshae
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    Another day of slowly cutting out the massive chunk of concrete under my porch which was actually just poured over an old garden bed (underneath is full of roots) which in turn was poured over the sand for pavers, which in turn sits over the old footpath which came down here.

    I have no words as to why literally any of this was done this way, except that I assume in the 70s diamond tools were more expensive then backing up a cement truck and letting rip.

    But I do know that the wood and soil behind it is absolutely soaked and so I'm glad to be getting ahead of this problem (under here is part of the finished basement but gets very damp when it rains).

    MichaelLC
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    so we had an insane temperature drop and rain/wind storm come in yesterday. Our house is only a few years old and so far no leaks until yesterday. Three of the windows in bedrooms had dripping while the storm was going. We've had storms previously and not had this problem so i'm not overly alarmed but wondering if anyone know if this is something that i should just use caulking or some sort of sealant or might there be a bigger issue?

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    It depends on where the water is coming in. If it's leaking around the actual windows themselves, the part that holds the glass, it would be a seal issue. If it's leaking around the frame then caulk on the outside would work just fine.

    nibXTE7.png
    Elvenshae
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Also could be coming from higher up like getting under siding but yeah check the glass and outside frame first.

    Could it just be condensation from the temp change?

  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    Also could be coming from higher up like getting under siding but yeah check the glass and outside frame first.

    Could it just be condensation from the temp change?

    it was only the windows on one side of the house that the wind was blowing into which doesn't 100% rule out condensation but the dripping was enough that it seems unlikely "to me."

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll probably end up doing both caulking and sealing as well as double checking that the water wasn't coming from up above. Appreciate the feedback!

  • SniperGuySniperGuy SniperGuyGaming Registered User regular
    Anyone have tips on running ethernet? My living room is where the cable that I can hook the modem to comes in. Basement is where my computer is and I definitely want to hard wire ethernet. Never dropped cable before but the basement is unfinished and I figure it won't be too hard?

    Seems like I'd want to basically cut a hole in the wall in the living room, run cable to basement, then make the living room hole a wall plate with an ethernet jack. And maybe get the basement a wall plate too, but there's no drywall for me to stick it in currently so not sure how that would work. Then I can run the router into the plate in the living room, then run my computer in the basement. I've heard of a patch panel but I'm not sure the purpose?

    Or I can pay cox a hundred bucks and supposedly they'll make the coax in my basement function as the cable where the internet comes in and I can hard wire my pc and run the rest of the house on wifi.

    Any thoughts?

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  • zagdrobzagdrob Registered User regular
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Anyone have tips on running ethernet? My living room is where the cable that I can hook the modem to comes in. Basement is where my computer is and I definitely want to hard wire ethernet. Never dropped cable before but the basement is unfinished and I figure it won't be too hard?

    Seems like I'd want to basically cut a hole in the wall in the living room, run cable to basement, then make the living room hole a wall plate with an ethernet jack. And maybe get the basement a wall plate too, but there's no drywall for me to stick it in currently so not sure how that would work. Then I can run the router into the plate in the living room, then run my computer in the basement. I've heard of a patch panel but I'm not sure the purpose?

    Or I can pay cox a hundred bucks and supposedly they'll make the coax in my basement function as the cable where the internet comes in and I can hard wire my pc and run the rest of the house on wifi.

    Any thoughts?

    Naw it's easy.

    Buy a cutout template for boxes and a zip tool (or zip bit for a dremel). Cut out and install low voltage old work boxes where you want them. You can get fancy with keystone plates and jacks if you want.

    It's kinda messy but just drywall dust. Avoid exterior walls if you can, even if it means longer cabling under a desk.

    If your basement is open you can use a 1/2 inch to 3/4 spade to drill into wall spaces and a fish tape to do your pulls. You can get everything at Harbor Freight for $20 or so.

    If you don't know how to wire RJ plugs just buy prepared cables at Monoprice in the estimated length you need. It's not hard but you don't save that much for the hassle. You gotta drill the holes slightly bigger for the ends and go up from the bottom.

    Buy a decent modem and router with good wifi. They aren't cheap but $350 every ten years isn't ridiculous for good internet.

    If you dont already have drops and there is no easy conduit just use wifi on the second floor. Running anything two stories sucks.

    GilgaronPailryderShadowfireTrajan45Thawmus
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    You're going to have to drill holes in the floor from the basement. Your first floor's walls sit on the floor, and you'll also need to drill through the framing base.

    It's not difficult but there's more wood than you'd expect at first.

    Also fwiw, any cable coming into the house can be used for the modem. You can move the modem anywhere that it can plug into coax and your service will still work. If you still have issues, we have a networking thread in Tech Tavern.

  • SniperGuySniperGuy SniperGuyGaming Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    You're going to have to drill holes in the floor from the basement. Your first floor's walls sit on the floor, and you'll also need to drill through the framing base.

    It's not difficult but there's more wood than you'd expect at first.

    Also fwiw, any cable coming into the house can be used for the modem. You can move the modem anywhere that it can plug into coax and your service will still work. If you still have issues, we have a networking thread in Tech Tavern.

    Well I tried plugging into the coax cable in the basement but it didn't work. Called my isp and they couldn't see it and said to plug it in somewhere else.

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  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    You're going to have to drill holes in the floor from the basement. Your first floor's walls sit on the floor, and you'll also need to drill through the framing base.

    It's not difficult but there's more wood than you'd expect at first.

    Also fwiw, any cable coming into the house can be used for the modem. You can move the modem anywhere that it can plug into coax and your service will still work. If you still have issues, we have a networking thread in Tech Tavern.

    Well I tried plugging into the coax cable in the basement but it didn't work. Called my isp and they couldn't see it and said to plug it in somewhere else.

    Not uncommon for an unused drop to simply be disconnected near a splitter somewhere else in the house because the splitter doesn't have enough connections for all the cables. Assuming you can trace the cable back, it's one thing to check.

    The other issue you could have is that every splice connector, splitter, and wall plate connector is reducing the signal level. So by the time it gets to the modem (or cable TV box), there may not be enough signal left for it to work. In that case the solution is to install an inline active return amplifier to boost the signal high enough to overcome the losses in all the connectors. Or if you're like me, your ISP just has well below spec signal levels coming into your house in the first place which also needs an amp to fix. I've got an Arris BDA-42-1-AR-R. An "active return" amp also amplifies the outbound signal back to the ISP. Cheaper amps only boost the inbound signal so may not make a modem work even if TVs are now OK.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    EtheaShadowfireTrajan45Thawmus
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    What sort of grease/lubricant should i use on my garage door?

    It's a chain drive, with metal rollers.

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited August 15
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    What sort of grease/lubricant should i use on my garage door?

    It's a chain drive, with metal rollers.

    look up the brand of opener. The website should have a recommended lubricant. Also, start with just a dallop. One of the big mistakes is over lubricating, then you'll get goobers of chain lube dripping on your car.

    webguy20 on
    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    [quote="zagdrob;c-43942681"
    If you don't know how to wire RJ plugs just buy prepared cables at Monoprice in the estimated length you need. It's not hard but you don't save that much for the hassle. You gotta drill the holes slightly bigger for the ends and go up from the bottom.
    [/quote]

    Note that if you're running a wire through the wall you need plenum grade cable, which is somewhat more expensive than the normal stuff.

    Also note that if you're making your own cables or wiring up keystone jacks, the cable crimper and the jack will have a color-coded diagram for how to wire things. And, also, as long as it's the same type of connector at both keystone jacks or both plugs) it doesn't really matter if you wire them correctly. You just have to put the same wires in the same places on both ends. It's just if you're doing plug on one end and a jack on the other that you need the right colors in the right places. Or if you're making a crossover cable instead of a patch cable, which you probably don't want to do anyway.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    You don't need plenum cables unless you're running the cables through air circulation systems which, if it's a home, would be crazy. As long as there's a CL rating you should be good to go.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    MugsleyThawmus
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited August 15
    zagdrob wrote: »
    If you don't know how to wire RJ plugs just buy prepared cables at Monoprice in the estimated length you need. It's not hard but you don't save that much for the hassle. You gotta drill the holes slightly bigger for the ends and go up from the bottom.

    Note that if you're running a wire through the wall you need plenum grade cable, which is somewhat more expensive than the normal stuff.

    Also note that if you're making your own cables or wiring up keystone jacks, the cable crimper and the jack will have a color-coded diagram for how to wire things. And, also, as long as it's the same type of connector at both keystone jacks or both plugs) it doesn't really matter if you wire them correctly. You just have to put the same wires in the same places on both ends. It's just if you're doing plug on one end and a jack on the other that you need the right colors in the right places. Or if you're making a crossover cable instead of a patch cable, which you probably don't want to do anyway.

    It actually does matter! Twisted pair depends on the matched pairs bring together - it *might* work if you just do it haphazardly but it'll probably be bad.

    electricitylikesme on
    Thawmus
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    This is getting too far in the weeds. Run cable and get a tester:

    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B08LQQLD5T/

    If you have issues or questions, ask for help.

    Having just run cables from a basement to an attic, it's not difficult but it's tedious.

    One tip: get the passthrough connectors because it makes connector installs 1000x easier.
    qabv5ar9e1u0.png

    Soggybiscuit
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    We stopped using passthrough connectors because they don't always cut cleanly. We've had more than one create shorts which has a good chance of causing damage when you're dealing with PoE equipment.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • ThawmusThawmus Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    You don't need plenum cables unless you're running the cables through air circulation systems which, if it's a home, would be crazy. As long as there's a CL rating you should be good to go.

    Yeah I'd actually recommend riser cable for most home use, but that's only if you're putting jacks in (and if you're putting jacks in, please, for the love of christ, put in a small patch panel and label your jacks, I know homeowners don't like to spend that kind of money on home networking but a conglomeration of terminated cables in your closet is a fucking nightmare for troubleshooting years down the road). If you're not putting jacks in and are just terminating cables, just buy patch cables from Monoprice and call it good.

    Side benefit to the patch panel + jacks is that the keystones usually have the diagram right there for you for punching, and you only have to get a punch-down tool and not a crimper ( @SniperGuy if you're still in IT you should have access to a punch-down tool, and if you don't, make your workplace get a punch-down tool and then borrow it immediately). Crimping is, IMHO, not foolproof at all and requires some practice to get right, I have seen sooooooo many bad crimps. I manage a WISP and new employees are always given a box of riser cable to snip and crimp when they're not busy so they can get good practice with it, and it often takes like 20-30 attempts before they get good at it. If this is your first time crimping, I kinda recommend just not ever crimping and kicking that can down the road to "never" unless you think this is a valuable skill to learn. Case in point, I do know how to crimp and can do it quite quickly now yet the skill has become useless to me nowadays, outside of teaching newbies. Punching, on the other hand, is something that'll definitely come in handy, and in most cases is the "correct" way for it to be done.

    Also when it comes to patch panels, I really recommend the modular ones as they tend to be much, much cheaper, and they're much easier to work with, you punch down into a keystone in your hand or on a flat surface, and then you attach it to the panel. I fucking hate angling the tool behind the panel it's a pain in the ass. I have gone modular for the past 5 buildings I've had to put new networking in and I will never look back. It takes up more space on the rack, and sometimes I'll break the clip on a keystone and have to replace it when I snap one in, but I don't give a fuck it's so much easier to work with.


    Here, I just looked it up on monoprice, god this is ridiculously cheap:

    Modular 24-port patch panel - $8.49

    Keystone Jacks - $1.49 each, can probably be found cheaper

    steam_sig.png
    Twitch: Thawmus83
    Youtube: Thawmus
  • SniperGuySniperGuy SniperGuyGaming Registered User regular
    So I ended up getting some riser cable and using that. I found a hole in the living room floor that was previously used by a phone cable and was able to send the cable to the basement that way. Installed a little vertical plate and used a cheap punchdown tool to set it up. So it looks pretty good on the wall and feeds into the basement.

    Basement currently a bit of a mess but I have wired ethernet! Gotta go get another little box and affix the cable properly to a wall to make it look nicer in the basement at some point. I had expected to put a wall plate in the wall but after drilling a hole and running a fish tape down, I discovered there's no exit into the basement from that wall and it's an exterior wall so figuring out where it actually spits out would be an endeavor and I don't want to put too many holes in the floors. Just have to patch up that hole in the wall now >.>

    I'm interested in a patch panel and stuff but currently we're not planning to run ethernet anywhere else other than from basement to living room so I'm not sure if it'd be worth it.

    I do now own way more riser cable than I need and a punchdown tool so if I need to make more keystones in the future, I can!

    Cat6 wooooo

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    CptHamiltonMichaelLCThawmusMugsleyShadowfirezagdrob
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Just for Thawmus I'm going to install networking throughout my house using a patch panel in the middle where I change the cable colors and then wall up the panel.

    All labeling will reference furniture, "Next to Michael's table".

    webguy20CptHamiltonThawmusdjmitchellaElvenshaeMadpoetMugsleyShadowfirePailryderSporkAndrewAegis
  • ThawmusThawmus Registered User regular
    Yeah if you're only running like 2-4 cables I wouldn't bother with the panel, but when someone says home networking I'm imagining wiring 2 walls in every room in the house (like I'm doing) and that's probably not correct for most people, that's my bad.

    steam_sig.png
    Twitch: Thawmus83
    Youtube: Thawmus
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Thawmus wrote: »
    Yeah if you're only running like 2-4 cables I wouldn't bother with the panel, but when someone says home networking I'm imagining wiring 2 walls in every room in the house (like I'm doing) and that's probably not correct for most people, that's my bad.

    Nah. Everyone needs to label their shit. Ideally by room and cardinal direction.

    Our house had a satellite dish. They had coax jacks in literally every room of the house. We installed cable, the technician tracked down the cable line from outside the house and ran a brand new cable to the central location where I wanted our TV / cable modem setup.

    So we have this nest of satellite coax in a little cabinet in our finished basement that I've got no idea where it runs to. At some point I'll need to get a tester or something to figure out where the cables actually lead, but in the short term it didn't matter because now everything streams anyway.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    I can't tell you how excited I am by the installation of this escalation.

    8xNkKzl.jpg?1

    Also picked up the lumber today to sister the undersized ceiling joists in the master bedroom, $444 for 22 20' 2x8s.

    nibXTE7.png
    MugsleyHappylilElfwebguy20AbsoluteZeroMichaelLCStabbity StyleTrajan45StarZapperzepherinSporkAndrewN1tSt4lkerCalicahonoverelonelyahavaAegisjimb213
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Hm.

    Router
    Cable modem
    My desktop
    Raspberry Pi
    Dongle for thermostat (don't get me started)
    PoE switch in attic
    NAS box
    At least 2 other keystone jacks

    Nah I don't need labels.
    >.>

    Oh and multiple runs are the same color cable.

    ThawmusMichaelLCSporkAndrewBrody
  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    Drywall for dummies question:

    We're moving to a new apartment soon and for the first time I have to deal with drywalls. Probably metal studs and only a single 12,5mm layer on each side. I'm not expecting there to be any reinforcements in there for higher loads.

    Anyway. We've got to secure some wardrobes to the wall with a mounting rail. The rail wants a s srcew about every 12", and every second drew will probably be in a stud then.

    Now the actual question. Cavity dowels for the screws in the drywall and drywall screws for the studs or also dowels there?

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Toggle bolts in the studs, not cavity dowels.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    Our pool is finally going in next week after almost 2 years of waiting and now that it's happening I have so much anxiety about my backyard just being absolutely decimated by the digging equipment.

    I know it's going to be awesome when it's all done but it is going to be hard to watch.

    MichaelLCTrajan45Brody
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited August 21
    If you're just mounting anti-tip brackets for those wardrobes, I don't think you need toggle bolts in the studs. Not going to hurt, but seems like overkill to me. Probably be fine with some standard threaded drywall anchors or winged plastic anchor. At the same time a screw every 12" also seems like an absolute amount of overkill for anti-tip.

    Simpsonia on
    ElvenshaeDoodmann
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    I'm not much a fan of traditional toggle bolts. Too fiddly with the nut not able to hold itself in the wall and they don't even fill the hole you leave in the wall.
    I really like the ones in this style for heavy duty applications:
    kdrf9v6bzwug.jpg

    They're usually called something like "strap anchors" or "flip toggles". The backing part can hold itself in the wall and fills in the hole.
    Though for most applications those anchors that are a big chonky screw thread are good enough.


    This video is fun.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
    Trajan45webguy20zepherinhonovereSyngyneBrodyAbsoluteZero
  • Trajan45Trajan45 Registered User regular
    Great video. I always just picked the ones I thought where the most solid, but never considered they'd also do the most damage if something happens to pull them out.

    Origin ID\ Steam ID: Warder45
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    I'm not much a fan of traditional toggle bolts. Too fiddly with the nut not able to hold itself in the wall and they don't even fill the hole you leave in the wall.
    I really like the ones in this style for heavy duty applications:
    kdrf9v6bzwug.jpg

    They're usually called something like "strap anchors" or "flip toggles". The backing part can hold itself in the wall and fills in the hole.
    Though for most applications those anchors that are a big chonky screw thread are good enough.


    This video is fun.

    The top ones are what we use for metal studs. They'll hold a big TV no problem, though there's a limit to what I'm comfortable with.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    honoverezepherin
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