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[Homeowner/House] Thread. How long is it going to take? Two weeks!

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Posts

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I bought cheap generic microfiber blackout curtains from amazon years ago.

    Qanamil
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Welp, just had a plumber come over to do a camera inspection. It is as we feared. Our sewer line is made of an outdated lateral material that was installed in the 70s and has started to warp and bubble. We're going to need to get the whole house intake replaced. Hooray. That's gonna be at least 5 grand plus a torn up front lawn and deck. Will likely need to tear out our cold storage in the basement too, as it's under the front deck in between the foundation and where the sewer line comes in.

    Sigh.

    Too late to sleeve the line?

    Not familiar with that process. What does that involve? The original installation is from the 70s, and I saw the camera feed myself. There are parts of the line that are half-closed due to the material blistering on the inside.

    The good news is that the blisters in question seem to be relatively smooth, so stuff hasn't been getting caught on them, but it's just a matter of time before the line gets fully blocked up.

    There's some kind of repair process where the original piping is sort of "reinforced" with a modern mix of epoxies and whatnot, and they sort of blow it into the pipe like a big balloon without having to dig up everything. I think they would just need to dig a hole to where it ends and then they can feed it in one direction or the other, flatten it all out into a lining, let it cure, and then refill whatever hole they made.

    schuss
  • Trajan45Trajan45 Registered User regular
    abotkin wrote: »
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Anyone have any curtain recommendations? We need 120" length which seems to be tough to find these days. Additionally 50" width works for some windows others we'll need 70"+ width. Kind of screws over the options from Wayfair and such. Pottery Barn only has a couple colors in stock (white and beige). The Shade Store will sell you anything but it's $1,300 a panel... Right now we're ordering samples from Etsy, but I'm wondering if anyone has any other ideas we might be overlooking.

    If you have/know someone who has a sewing machine, curtains are basically as simple as it gets for making your own. And then you have access to all the fabric under the sun to choose from. Plus then you can decide exactly how thick you want them, so you can easily get anything from full blackout curtains to ones that will still let in diffuse light.

    Honestly if you have the time and even the tiniest bit of inclination, you might come out ahead even if you have to buy a cheap sewing machine, depending on how many curtains you're looking at.

    That was one of the first things we thought of haha. But weirdly it's harder than you'd think. Even if we borrow our friends sewing machine, to get fabric that would allow for 60" wide panels is rather hard to find. Looking at Joanne Fabrics, 54" wide seems to be the default. And depending on the fabric, it can be quite expensive. I was a bit shocked to see $20-40 a yard for a lot of stuff.

    I was surprised that JcPenny's had 100"w x 120"l options. We'll keep them in mind. They are just as expensive as Etsy though and seem to have less color options. Also I'd rather support the small business if I can.

    Origin ID\ Steam ID: Warder45
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    abotkin wrote: »
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Anyone have any curtain recommendations? We need 120" length which seems to be tough to find these days. Additionally 50" width works for some windows others we'll need 70"+ width. Kind of screws over the options from Wayfair and such. Pottery Barn only has a couple colors in stock (white and beige). The Shade Store will sell you anything but it's $1,300 a panel... Right now we're ordering samples from Etsy, but I'm wondering if anyone has any other ideas we might be overlooking.

    If you have/know someone who has a sewing machine, curtains are basically as simple as it gets for making your own. And then you have access to all the fabric under the sun to choose from. Plus then you can decide exactly how thick you want them, so you can easily get anything from full blackout curtains to ones that will still let in diffuse light.

    Honestly if you have the time and even the tiniest bit of inclination, you might come out ahead even if you have to buy a cheap sewing machine, depending on how many curtains you're looking at.

    That was one of the first things we thought of haha. But weirdly it's harder than you'd think. Even if we borrow our friends sewing machine, to get fabric that would allow for 60" wide panels is rather hard to find. Looking at Joanne Fabrics, 54" wide seems to be the default. And depending on the fabric, it can be quite expensive. I was a bit shocked to see $20-40 a yard for a lot of stuff.

    I was surprised that JcPenny's had 100"w x 120"l options. We'll keep them in mind. They are just as expensive as Etsy though and seem to have less color options. Also I'd rather support the small business if I can.

    This is actually what I was going to comment. Good fabric, esp good drapery fabric, is not cheap. And you're looking at at least 5 yards of fabric, I'd imagine, so yeah. If you can find already made drapes that work for you, you should take them. There's a reason why I'm working with combining multiple curtain panels from Target to make pinch pleat drapes for my bedroom.

    Now. One thing you might could do, with a big ole "depending on stuff" attached, is use sheets for your fabric. You will probably have to line them (but you should be lining any good drapes you're making, esp if the windows get a lot of sun), but a lot of people use sheets when they need a lot of fabric for much less money than uying yardage.

    EtheaTrajan45
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Welp, just had a plumber come over to do a camera inspection. It is as we feared. Our sewer line is made of an outdated lateral material that was installed in the 70s and has started to warp and bubble. We're going to need to get the whole house intake replaced. Hooray. That's gonna be at least 5 grand plus a torn up front lawn and deck. Will likely need to tear out our cold storage in the basement too, as it's under the front deck in between the foundation and where the sewer line comes in.

    Sigh.

    Too late to sleeve the line?

    Not familiar with that process. What does that involve? The original installation is from the 70s, and I saw the camera feed myself. There are parts of the line that are half-closed due to the material blistering on the inside.

    The good news is that the blisters in question seem to be relatively smooth, so stuff hasn't been getting caught on them, but it's just a matter of time before the line gets fully blocked up.

    There's a process where a structurally sound pipe can be fitted with an internal sleeve that would restore the smooth lining of the pipe:

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited September 10
    That's what my city has been doing with the outbound pipes. Interesting seeing the new plastic tubes laying all over the place.

    Also gas company had been switching meters to outside and putting in what looked like pex pipes and just leaving the old ones.

    Been a lot of construction activity this summer.

    MichaelLC on
  • Romantic UndeadRomantic Undead Registered User regular
    Welp, just had a plumber come over to do a camera inspection. It is as we feared. Our sewer line is made of an outdated lateral material that was installed in the 70s and has started to warp and bubble. We're going to need to get the whole house intake replaced. Hooray. That's gonna be at least 5 grand plus a torn up front lawn and deck. Will likely need to tear out our cold storage in the basement too, as it's under the front deck in between the foundation and where the sewer line comes in.

    Sigh.

    Too late to sleeve the line?

    Not familiar with that process. What does that involve? The original installation is from the 70s, and I saw the camera feed myself. There are parts of the line that are half-closed due to the material blistering on the inside.

    The good news is that the blisters in question seem to be relatively smooth, so stuff hasn't been getting caught on them, but it's just a matter of time before the line gets fully blocked up.

    There's a process where a structurally sound pipe can be fitted with an internal sleeve that would restore the smooth lining of the pipe:


    There was definitely a part of the pipe that had a pretty massive blister, and I'm worried that the blisters inside might just continue to grow underneath the epoxy, leading to the pipe eventually closing anyways. But if the epoxy in question is tough enough to contain/prevent future blister growth, it might be worth my while. Thanks for the Info! I'll look into it.

    3DS FC: 1547-5210-6531
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    I also have replacing sewer line on my list... ours is ceramic so it's basically invulnerable except the tree roots have wormed their way into the seams. Will need to go PVC I think to make it all one solid piece and root-prof.

    But I was planning on ripping up the driveway anyway cause there are a few projects in my yard that would benefit from burying various bits of infrastructure... our house is set way back on our lot and we have overhead power/data lines coming from the other side of the street, just ridiculously long hangs that are all up in the trees, would like to put up a pole at the sidewalk to catch em and then bury the lines to the house. Plus we could run some extra water lines to get additional hose spigots for where the garden boxes are gonna be. Possibly run some power for lighting on the driveway. And we wanted to re do the paving anyway...

    Yeah. Saving up, heh.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • HedgethornHedgethorn Associate Professor of Historical Hobby Horses In the Lions' DenRegistered User regular
    Welp, just had a plumber come over to do a camera inspection. It is as we feared. Our sewer line is made of an outdated lateral material that was installed in the 70s and has started to warp and bubble. We're going to need to get the whole house intake replaced. Hooray. That's gonna be at least 5 grand plus a torn up front lawn and deck. Will likely need to tear out our cold storage in the basement too, as it's under the front deck in between the foundation and where the sewer line comes in.

    Sigh.

    Too late to sleeve the line?

    Not familiar with that process. What does that involve? The original installation is from the 70s, and I saw the camera feed myself. There are parts of the line that are half-closed due to the material blistering on the inside.

    The good news is that the blisters in question seem to be relatively smooth, so stuff hasn't been getting caught on them, but it's just a matter of time before the line gets fully blocked up.

    There's some kind of repair process where the original piping is sort of "reinforced" with a modern mix of epoxies and whatnot, and they sort of blow it into the pipe like a big balloon without having to dig up everything. I think they would just need to dig a hole to where it ends and then they can feed it in one direction or the other, flatten it all out into a lining, let it cure, and then refill whatever hole they made.

    Last year we discovered cracks in our old cast iron sewer pipes (which created the sinkhole under our bathroom, if people remember that story). Our contractors recommended this sewer sleeve method: they just went straight down the toilet drain and relined about 30 or 40 feet of sewer pipe with epoxy without having to do anything beyond pulling the toilet. The cost was maybe $1000 even? I heartily recommend it the current state of your pipes will allow it.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    I get to attempt hydraulic mining this weekend to run a drain pipe under the sidewalk. I'm going to attempt to do it with the hose before I upgrade to a power washer.

    I basically want to run the outlet of the sump pump the rest of the way to the street.

    Later I'm going to add some 4" runs from the house to that pipe and cut back the 1.5" sump line (less pressure head)

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    When you get a house you're looking to buy inspected, you think, look at the wiring. Look at plumbing, drainage. Look at how the roof's holding up. You don't think, did they actually build the wall on the foundation?

    I was removing drywall to add blocks to the bottom plate on the wall, to raise it up so we can put down subfloor over the concrete slab and install hardwood. I noticed some light coming through where one of the bolts that attached the bottom plate to the concrete slab was. I went outside, and found this.

    A6pwXEp.jpg?1

    That's the front corner of the master bedroom, hanging more than two inches off the slab. It's a 2x4 wall, meaning there's about an inch actually on the slab. Several of the mounting bolts are exposed along the slab. Because when they installed them and built the wall, they built it lined up with the outside of the forms that were holding the slab pour in place, instead of lined up with the actual slab. It's like that all the way around the addition, a 500ish square foot area. It was hidden by the siding on the house, without laying down and looking up under it you couldn't see it.

    I understand why people commit murder now.

    Red RaevynDoodmannShadowfireMichaelLCzepherinHappylilElfelectricitylikesmeStarZapperAbsoluteZeroGrudgejkylefultonKruiteGilgaronSporkAndrewSatanIsMyMotorDaenrisBullheadFoolOnTheHillCorvus
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    So for water intake I don’t like sleeves as a repair, because it tends to only last 5 years or so. But if I didn’t want to go through my deck, I’d bypass the line and abandon the old one in place.

    They are still going to have to tear up the yard though. Your municipality may not allow abandoned in place lines.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    edited September 11
    Adventures in hydraulic drilling! As I sort of expected, we actually had to do most of it by hand because our soil is 90% clay (the whole development used to be a swamp/flood plain)

    But the deed is done. And my wife convinced me to grab some corrugated pipe to run a new downspout drain.
    lhyf676c6jjb.jpg

    qgfdtyxl4byd.jpg

    Mugsley on
    matt has a problemShadowfireICUb
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Also everything hurts.

    matt has a problemSoggybiscuitMichaelLCShadowfireAbsoluteZerozepherin
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    Ugh I still need to bury downspout drains.

    And all in the backyard so I need to get those seeper sections to end the runs.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    We did solid corrugated pipe. I did a few tests with the sump pump so it looks like everything will work. I need to add a short runout on the downspout and I think I'm good.

    We ran the pipe out to the street so we'll see how this goes.

  • DecatusDecatus Registered User regular
    So...in our new house there isn't really anywhere to put the TV stand we were using before; wife wants us to go ahead and do a wall mount. The only spot that will really work is in a corner and over an enclosed gas fireplace which we likely won't be using much at all. I believe my TV is a 65" class, is that going to be too big to try and squeeze into a corner or potentially too heavy to mount? Is there anything in particular I should look out for when having someone come out to do the wall mount, or is there a particular brand of brackets/mounts that are better than the rest?

    PSN: decatus90
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited September 12
    Decatus wrote: »
    So...in our new house there isn't really anywhere to put the TV stand we were using before; wife wants us to go ahead and do a wall mount. The only spot that will really work is in a corner and over an enclosed gas fireplace which we likely won't be using much at all. I believe my TV is a 65" class, is that going to be too big to try and squeeze into a corner or potentially too heavy to mount? Is there anything in particular I should look out for when having someone come out to do the wall mount, or is there a particular brand of brackets/mounts that are better than the rest?

    Wall mounting is easy enough in the corner, just don't buy the "corner mount" brackets because they're a pain in the ass. TVs don't weigh anything anymore, it's all wingspan, so a regular arm mount will do just fine as long as it's long enough. I personally prefer Sanus and Rocketfish mounts because they're easier to work with and work better on wider stud bays (in case whoever built your house didn't like standards, very common).

    The only difficulty in your case might be if you're connecting sources. A lot of us don't have cable boxes or anything anymore, but game systems become A Thing in this case because of the fireplace. I've had good luck with floating shelves in those cases, they're flexible enough to put under or next to the TV with minimal wires showing.

    The only other suggestion is to make sure your audio solution is taken care of. If you have a soundbar, you'll want a soundbar bracket that attaches to the mount. If you're using a receiver, your speakers will likely need to move. No big deal, just keep placement in mind.

    Shadowfire on
    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    EtheaDecatusCptHamiltonTrajan45
  • finalflight89finalflight89 Registered User regular
    I used this mount for a 55" TV mounted in a corner. Expensive, but super solid. Also easy to move and get behind it when you need to.
    https://www.amazon.com/Mount-Extension-Articulating-800x400mm-Compatible/dp/B07K7VTX8R

    Decatus
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    My one thought is to keep in mind how old the house is, and where studs might be placed. Ours was built with studs on 24" centers, so we had to order a mount online, since all the ones we could find in stores were designed a more modern 18" max stud spacing.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
    Shadowfire
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited September 12
    Brody wrote: »
    My one thought is to keep in mind how old the house is, and where studs might be placed. Ours was built with studs on 24" centers, so we had to order a mount online, since all the ones we could find in stores were designed a more modern 18" max stud spacing.

    This Rocketfish mount and the one finalfight posted will both accommodate 24" studs. Over a fireplace can get weird though, especially with corner placement. A picture would help since I'm having trouble picturing exactly what's going on. Are there studs over the fireplace? Did someone through some sheetrock up with a tiny bit of strapping (lol you're fucked)? Did they put some good solid plywood up there?

    I mean, at first description it's pretty simple-ish, but I don't want to lead you down the wrong path here.

    Edit: also stud distance doesn't have a ton to do with the age of the house. I've seen new construction with 24" studs everywhere, I've seen buildings with these dumb 30" interior studs that have cross supports making this dumb tic-tac-toe board thing in the wall and made my head hurt. And I had a house last week that the homeowner reframed the living room and the studs were crooked (was there doing a pre-wire, noped out of that one). So just.. double-check. Stud finders are big liars, grab a strong magnet and look for the nails holding the sheetrock to the studs.

    Shadowfire on
    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • DecatusDecatus Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    My one thought is to keep in mind how old the house is, and where studs might be placed. Ours was built with studs on 24" centers, so we had to order a mount online, since all the ones we could find in stores were designed a more modern 18" max stud spacing.

    This Rocketfish mount and the one finalfight posted will both accommodate 24" studs. Over a fireplace can get weird though, especially with corner placement. A picture would help since I'm having trouble picturing exactly what's going on. Are there studs over the fireplace? Did someone through some sheetrock up with a tiny bit of strapping (lol you're fucked)? Did they put some good solid plywood up there?

    I mean, at first description it's pretty simple-ish, but I don't want to lead you down the wrong path here.

    Edit: also stud distance doesn't have a ton to do with the age of the house. I've seen new construction with 24" studs everywhere, I've seen buildings with these dumb 30" interior studs that have cross supports making this dumb tic-tac-toe board thing in the wall and made my head hurt. And I had a house last week that the homeowner reframed the living room and the studs were crooked (was there doing a pre-wire, noped out of that one). So just.. double-check. Stud finders are big liars, grab a strong magnet and look for the nails holding the sheetrock to the studs.

    Yeah, these are good points. Im not going to order anything until I can check out the stud situation - the new house isnt quite ours yet but we get keys on the 20th so then the fun begins.

    PSN: decatus90
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Replacing broken balances on a couple windows, I should probably just double up my buy and replace both sides while I've got the window out, yeah?

    MichaelLCMugsley
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Replacing broken balances on a couple windows, I should probably just double up my buy and replace both sides while I've got the window out, yeah?

    Given it sounds like you are repairing them for age related wear, yes I'd save the future labor and just do both sides now.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    webguy20
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Replacing broken balances on a couple windows, I should probably just double up my buy and replace both sides while I've got the window out, yeah?

    Given it sounds like you are repairing them for age related wear, yes I'd save the future labor and just do both sides now.

    Yeah, I've had the string break on two windows on back to back nights. We've only been here a year but I'm assuming these are all original from when this place was built like 16 years ago.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    House thread! I’m trying to hang a wood rack off my garage wall, which is cinder blocks. The instructions say to use 1/4”x3” masonry anchors. I’m guessing for a block wall I want toggle bolts? Or would 3” masonry screws work?

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    House thread! I’m trying to hang a wood rack off my garage wall, which is cinder blocks. The instructions say to use 1/4”x3” masonry anchors. I’m guessing for a block wall I want toggle bolts? Or would 3” masonry screws work?

    I wouldn't love a lot of toggle bolts since you'll be using this in a garage which might as well be outside. I don't have a ton of experience with cinder block, but I'd say either sleeve anchors or lag shields are probably the way to go there, leaning toward sleeve anchors if the cinder block is at all suspect.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    CptHamilton
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    My guys always use stainless steel wedge anchors from fastanal. I’m not sure what brand they are. Which is bad materials ordering on my part, but they work well.

    CptHamilton
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    House thread! I’m trying to hang a wood rack off my garage wall, which is cinder blocks. The instructions say to use 1/4”x3” masonry anchors. I’m guessing for a block wall I want toggle bolts? Or would 3” masonry screws work?

    I wouldn't love a lot of toggle bolts since you'll be using this in a garage which might as well be outside. I don't have a ton of experience with cinder block, but I'd say either sleeve anchors or lag shields are probably the way to go there, leaning toward sleeve anchors if the cinder block is at all suspect.

    I guess the not wanting toggle bolts is because they’re not generally rust-proof?

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    zepherin
  • rndmherorndmhero Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    My guys always use stainless steel wedge anchors from fast anal. I’m not sure what brand they are. Which is bad materials ordering on my part, but they work well.

    :?

    zepherinAbsoluteZeroAimHappylilElfschussN1tSt4lkerLaOsElvenshae
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    House thread! I’m trying to hang a wood rack off my garage wall, which is cinder blocks. The instructions say to use 1/4”x3” masonry anchors. I’m guessing for a block wall I want toggle bolts? Or would 3” masonry screws work?

    I wouldn't love a lot of toggle bolts since you'll be using this in a garage which might as well be outside. I don't have a ton of experience with cinder block, but I'd say either sleeve anchors or lag shields are probably the way to go there, leaning toward sleeve anchors if the cinder block is at all suspect.

    I guess the not wanting toggle bolts is because they’re not generally rust-proof?

    Yeah, anywhere there's likely to be moisture (so outside) makes toggles a bit of a crapshoot.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    House thread! I’m trying to hang a wood rack off my garage wall, which is cinder blocks. The instructions say to use 1/4”x3” masonry anchors. I’m guessing for a block wall I want toggle bolts? Or would 3” masonry screws work?

    I wouldn't love a lot of toggle bolts since you'll be using this in a garage which might as well be outside. I don't have a ton of experience with cinder block, but I'd say either sleeve anchors or lag shields are probably the way to go there, leaning toward sleeve anchors if the cinder block is at all suspect.

    I guess the not wanting toggle bolts is because they’re not generally rust-proof?
    They make stainless steel toggles, but they are more expensive. Don’t get the zinc toggles. They’ll rust out.
    rndmhero wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    My guys always use stainless steel wedge anchors from fast anal. I’m not sure what brand they are. Which is bad materials ordering on my part, but they work well.

    :?

    Some people like fast anal some people like slow anal. Some people misspell fastenal.

    ShadowfireHappylilElfLaOsBrodyElvenshaeFoolOnTheHillTrajan45MegaMan001
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Speaking as someone who is still trying to find a usable LED bulb for an enclosed fixture, DO NOT put enclosed fixtures in your home. Finding suitable bulbs is a terrible experience. If you have to, try one of the new LED fixtures instead.

  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    Speaking as someone who is still trying to find a usable LED bulb for an enclosed fixture, DO NOT put enclosed fixtures in your home. Finding suitable bulbs is a terrible experience. If you have to, try one of the new LED fixtures instead.

    Did you try the ones for ceiling fans? Usually rated for enclosures, dimmable, and vibration resistant. Small and standard base.

  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    Speaking as someone who is still trying to find a usable LED bulb for an enclosed fixture, DO NOT put enclosed fixtures in your home. Finding suitable bulbs is a terrible experience. If you have to, try one of the new LED fixtures instead.

    Did you try the ones for ceiling fans? Usually rated for enclosures, dimmable, and vibration resistant. Small and standard base.

    Oh, I've resolved this already, but it would have been 10 times easier if I could simply have gone to the store and bought a bulb. Instead I had to do research, and now I'm going to be waiting with an annoyingly dim kitchen until my order arrives.

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Wait, where was the issue? Can't you just use a normal bulb in those? Or is it an especially small enclosed fixture?

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    I'm surprised LED bulbs even have special enclosed versions... they don't get hot, I didn't think? I guess maybe hot enough in a little metal can?

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    Pailryder
  • StraygatsbyStraygatsby Registered User regular
    I love trees. I hate trees.

    One of our live oaks dropped a big 14' chonker of a branch on our lawn. We called one of the local arborists who came out, said the tree was fine, and prepared to write us a quote for chipping and haulaway. Then, they updated the response saying they had time to walk around our place and were concerned that two of our even bigger oaks might be showing signs of heart rot. After we asked them to put together another quote for treating/trimming these, they responded by saying they didn't have the staff available to help right now. When we asked about the original quote for the limb, they ghosted us.

    Hell is other people [working on your home].

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    edited September 20
    I'm surprised LED bulbs even have special enclosed versions... they don't get hot, I didn't think? I guess maybe hot enough in a little metal can?

    Nah. They should be generating next to nothing. I actually did a bunch of research originally because I was worried about putting an eg. 12w led in a 60w socket, and my dad pointed out that the bulb itself is what's drawing the electricity, and a 60w bulb is actually always going to try and draw 60w, and you are more worried about the number on the bulb being higher than that on the socket. (I am not and electrician, and it could be I'm fucking this up) So theoretically as long as the bulb physically fits, and is rated below what the socket lists (hard to fail if it's rated for a filament bulb), you should be fine.

    Brody on
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  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Wait, where was the issue? Can't you just use a normal bulb in those? Or is it an especially small enclosed fixture?

    99% of LED bulbs have fine print somewhere that say "not for use in totally enclosed fixtures". This is because LEDs put out heat, and rely on the environment to remove it. An incandescent bulb puts out more heat, but an LED has a lower maximum temperature before it starts to bake itself. In an enclosed fixture, there's no air movement to pull the heat out, so the temperature inside can get absurd. This can cause failure, usually not in a dramatic fashion, but it will shorten the lifespan of the bulb. If this is just a closet light, or something else that isn't kept on for hours at a time, this doesn't matter, but for general lighting purposes, this is important to keep bulbs from dying after a year or so.

    From my research, it looks like some brands actually make LEDs that are designed for enclosed fixtures: Ecosmart and Cree are the ones I remember. There's not even that much of a price difference, it's just that your normal retail store may not have any, and the packaging definitely doesn't make it obvious which bulbs are suitable for this.

    mrondeauGilgaronMichaelLChonovere
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