As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

[Homeowner/House] Thread. How long is it going to take? Two weeks!

1747577798082

Posts

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Wait, where was the issue? Can't you just use a normal bulb in those? Or is it an especially small enclosed fixture?

    99% of LED bulbs have fine print somewhere that say "not for use in totally enclosed fixtures". This is because LEDs put out heat, and rely on the environment to remove it. An incandescent bulb puts out more heat, but an LED has a lower maximum temperature before it starts to bake itself. In an enclosed fixture, there's no air movement to pull the heat out, so the temperature inside can get absurd. This can cause failure, usually not in a dramatic fashion, but it will shorten the lifespan of the bulb. If this is just a closet light, or something else that isn't kept on for hours at a time, this doesn't matter, but for general lighting purposes, this is important to keep bulbs from dying after a year or so.

    From my research, it looks like some brands actually make LEDs that are designed for enclosed fixtures: Ecosmart and Cree are the ones I remember. There's not even that much of a price difference, it's just that your normal retail store may not have any, and the packaging definitely doesn't make it obvious which bulbs are suitable for this.

    Oh shit, I guess I'm wrong then. It seems like it would still be fairly easy to circumnavigate the issue, depending on the shape of the fixture... although I guess with a boob light there isn't really a good place to drill some holes or w/e.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    Wait, where was the issue? Can't you just use a normal bulb in those? Or is it an especially small enclosed fixture?

    99% of LED bulbs have fine print somewhere that say "not for use in totally enclosed fixtures". This is because LEDs put out heat, and rely on the environment to remove it. An incandescent bulb puts out more heat, but an LED has a lower maximum temperature before it starts to bake itself. In an enclosed fixture, there's no air movement to pull the heat out, so the temperature inside can get absurd. This can cause failure, usually not in a dramatic fashion, but it will shorten the lifespan of the bulb. If this is just a closet light, or something else that isn't kept on for hours at a time, this doesn't matter, but for general lighting purposes, this is important to keep bulbs from dying after a year or so.

    From my research, it looks like some brands actually make LEDs that are designed for enclosed fixtures: Ecosmart and Cree are the ones I remember. There's not even that much of a price difference, it's just that your normal retail store may not have any, and the packaging definitely doesn't make it obvious which bulbs are suitable for this.

    Oh shit, I guess I'm wrong then. It seems like it would still be fairly easy to circumnavigate the issue, depending on the shape of the fixture... although I guess with a boob light there isn't really a good place to drill some holes or w/e.

    Anyway, the actual point is that, considering how common totally-enclosed fixtures are, getting a LED bulb that's actually rated for a totally-enclosed fixture is much harder than you'd think. I shouldn't need to go on the internet and order an LED bulb like it's some kind of specialty item, I should just need to go down to the store and buy a bulb. But I can't. And that's why you shouldn't put totally-enclosed fixtures in your house: you avoid that whole annoyance.

  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    The bulb manufacturers don't really care, it's like the only way you'll ever buy a replacement bulb now.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
    mrondeauevilmrhenry
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    Wait, where was the issue? Can't you just use a normal bulb in those? Or is it an especially small enclosed fixture?

    99% of LED bulbs have fine print somewhere that say "not for use in totally enclosed fixtures". This is because LEDs put out heat, and rely on the environment to remove it. An incandescent bulb puts out more heat, but an LED has a lower maximum temperature before it starts to bake itself. In an enclosed fixture, there's no air movement to pull the heat out, so the temperature inside can get absurd. This can cause failure, usually not in a dramatic fashion, but it will shorten the lifespan of the bulb. If this is just a closet light, or something else that isn't kept on for hours at a time, this doesn't matter, but for general lighting purposes, this is important to keep bulbs from dying after a year or so.

    From my research, it looks like some brands actually make LEDs that are designed for enclosed fixtures: Ecosmart and Cree are the ones I remember. There's not even that much of a price difference, it's just that your normal retail store may not have any, and the packaging definitely doesn't make it obvious which bulbs are suitable for this.

    Oh shit, I guess I'm wrong then. It seems like it would still be fairly easy to circumnavigate the issue, depending on the shape of the fixture... although I guess with a boob light there isn't really a good place to drill some holes or w/e.

    Anyway, the actual point is that, considering how common totally-enclosed fixtures are, getting a LED bulb that's actually rated for a totally-enclosed fixture is much harder than you'd think. I shouldn't need to go on the internet and order an LED bulb like it's some kind of specialty item, I should just need to go down to the store and buy a bulb. But I can't. And that's why you shouldn't put totally-enclosed fixtures in your house: you avoid that whole annoyance.

    I mean, most totally enclosed fixtures look like ass anyways, so also don't use totally enclosed fixtures because they are dumb.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    I made the "mistake" of buying cheap LED bulbs for an enclosed light source (an enclosed bowl fixture on a ceiling fan), and the fine print saying "not for enclosed spaces".

    Honestly... nothing happened. I watched them for about a month just in case. 2 years later they were still fine. I then moved out of that place so... maybe something could have happened since. I think at worst you'll just blow out the bulb a lot faster than normal, but it'll still last a whole lot longer than a regular bulb, so it's all good either way.

    "The sausage of Green Earth explodes with flavor like the cannon of culinary delight."
    PSN: TheWolfman64 3DS/Pokemon Y: 0774-4614-4065/NNID: the_wolfman64
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    I made the "mistake" of buying cheap LED bulbs for an enclosed light source (an enclosed bowl fixture on a ceiling fan), and the fine print saying "not for enclosed spaces".

    Honestly... nothing happened. I watched them for about a month just in case. 2 years later they were still fine. I then moved out of that place so... maybe something could have happened since. I think at worst you'll just blow out the bulb a lot faster than normal, but it'll still last a whole lot longer than a regular bulb, so it's all good either way.

    Now I want to do some tests, but that seems like so much effort.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    I made the "mistake" of buying cheap LED bulbs for an enclosed light source (an enclosed bowl fixture on a ceiling fan), and the fine print saying "not for enclosed spaces".

    Honestly... nothing happened. I watched them for about a month just in case. 2 years later they were still fine. I then moved out of that place so... maybe something could have happened since. I think at worst you'll just blow out the bulb a lot faster than normal, but it'll still last a whole lot longer than a regular bulb, so it's all good either way.

    Now I want to do some tests, but that seems like so much effort.

    If you want some contrasting anecdotal information, I had 4 out of 6 CFL bulbs burn out in my (enclosed) kitchen lights at my old place over the course of a couple years. All 6 were not rated for enclosed fixtures. I replaced them with LEDs that were rated for enclosed fixtures. (I would have replaced them in bulk and used the original bulbs elsewhere, but they were GU24 sockets, and I didn't expect to ever use those again.)

    Jebus314DisruptedCapitalist
  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit 4.5 MV of POWER! Registered User regular


    It's all planned obsolescence with light bulbs. I've actually got a bulb that was designed to last and last, and actually do 100k+ hours. Its been on for 8 years now? Only goes out during power outages.

    I wish all bulbs were designed to actually last that long because its damn wasteful to have that much material go into the trash when they expire. I don't know anyone that recycles the bulbs, and they are a beast to repair.

    Steam - Synthetic Violence | XBOX Live - Cannonfuse | PSN - CastleBravo | Twitch - SoggybiscuitPA
    zepherinPailryder
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    I made the "mistake" of buying cheap LED bulbs for an enclosed light source (an enclosed bowl fixture on a ceiling fan), and the fine print saying "not for enclosed spaces".

    Honestly... nothing happened. I watched them for about a month just in case. 2 years later they were still fine. I then moved out of that place so... maybe something could have happened since. I think at worst you'll just blow out the bulb a lot faster than normal, but it'll still last a whole lot longer than a regular bulb, so it's all good either way.

    Now I want to do some tests, but that seems like so much effort.

    These tests are how you start a YouTube channel

    Elvenshae
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    I made the "mistake" of buying cheap LED bulbs for an enclosed light source (an enclosed bowl fixture on a ceiling fan), and the fine print saying "not for enclosed spaces".

    Honestly... nothing happened. I watched them for about a month just in case. 2 years later they were still fine. I then moved out of that place so... maybe something could have happened since. I think at worst you'll just blow out the bulb a lot faster than normal, but it'll still last a whole lot longer than a regular bulb, so it's all good either way.

    Now I want to do some tests, but that seems like so much effort.

    These tests are how you start a YouTube channel

    I expect the life cycle, even enclosed, is still way longer than I actually want to try testing.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
    ReaperSMSJebus314
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    edited September 21
    LEDs have done a good job wrecking the planned obsolescence game of traditional light bulbs. They tried with CFLs and better incandescents, but LEDs are easy enough to manufacture at scale that there are many companies making LED light bulbs. And so it would be almost impossible to set up another Phoebus cartel.

    zepherin on
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    edited September 21
    Shitty LED bulbs rely on overvolting cheap diodes that directly lead to the problems in enclosed lamps and other premature death. Good quality bulbs have LEDs rated for the voltage they're pushing.

    There's 1 place in the world where bulbs are ACTUALLY engineered to last nearly forever. Dubai. The ruler of Dubai, Maktoum, has "inspired" new ultra efficient lighting that is currently being used in all public buildings. They're basically taking higher voltage LEDs and uvervolting them so they always run at their most efficient. The 3 Watt Dubai Lamp is capable of outputting a full 600 lumens of nice 2700k light and should ACTUALLY last for more than 25 years.

    https://www.mea.lighting.philips.com/consumer/dubai-lamp

    That_Guy on
    DoodmannevilmrhenryPailryderShadowfireSoggybiscuitCalicaBrodyAim
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited September 21
    I have finally gotten the drainage on the back of my house sorted out, and figured out why it was so bad. This was the situation before I did anything:

    M3QdC7e.png

    All the roof in red drained into gutters that converged on the yellow square, which is a poorly constructed catch basin attached to a single buried 3" line. The light purple roof at the top left just ran off onto the ground, then flowed down the side of the garage to the same catch basin. The green roof flowed into a gutter that emptied on the ground at the bottom yellow square.

    However.

    That light purple area at the bottom is all HIGHER than where the downspout emptied. I knew about the yard, since the slope was obvious, but the square area was a deck that the downspout pointed under. What I didn't know was that the dirt was mounded a foot higher under the deck than the surrounding ground for some reason, I discovered that after removing the garbage deck.

    So the water would pool on the ground behind the house and a 50 foot long, 5 foot wide pond would form any time we'd get significant rain. Everything that flowed off the colored areas would be trying to get through that single 3" buried line, probably around 3500 square feet of roof. And it wouldn't of course, so it'd seep into the ground or just flow through the foundation vents when it got high enough, since they were either constructed too low or the back yard has been filled in over the years until it's almost level with them, under the house, and fill a hollowed out area in the dirt the previous someone had created to try and direct the water to a cistern where it could be pumped out. This meant that any time we got a decent rain of an inch of more everything under the house would be soaked and the pumps would be running to keep things dry. What happens when the pumps aren't running because the power got knocked out? This!

    aXl94Wj.jpg?1

    That was two days before we moved in. It worked out though, the owner gave us $2k in cash, the only thing in the basements was the furnace and it was powered off, so it just required a cleaning and it started working again fine. I also upgraded the pumps and rerouted where the under-house water went.

    So to fix all this, I upgraded the back of the house from 4" to 6" gutters, and they now all flow towards that bottom yellow square. It's also piped along the side of the house to the front yard now, until I can get some earth moving equipment to properly grade the back and side yard. This week was the first real test, it rained for the past two days straight, and aside from a slight bit of seepage at the bottom of the steps through a crack I can patch with some hydraulic cement, the basement is dry.

    matt has a problem on
    zepherinHappylilElfElvenshaeBullheadMichaelLCMugsleyjkylefultonSporkAndrewDaenrisThawmuslonelyahavaFoolOnTheHillMechMantisdjmitchellaTrajan45BrodyAl_wat
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited September 21
    It's not a real basement. It's about a 12x12 room with a concrete floor and a half-height block wall, the rest of the under side of the house is all dirt. It had the original oil furnace in it, and the guy who lived here 30 years ago kept his washer and dryer down there. There's also a dirt floor area that we figure was some kind of root cellar. We knew it wasn't supposed to flood like that, because we knew the original owner, and knew there was no way he would've been able to handle a washer and dryer in an area that wet all the time. When the fuckup we bought it from put the addition on the house and the big garage, he just utterly screwed the drainage and created the problem.

    matt has a problem on
    Mugsley
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    So concerning mice. Don't read if you like them.
    I think I mentioned before but I've been seeing mice outside, particularly by our A/C. Not great but outside so whatever.

    It started going bad when a few tried to climb it the top and got hit by the blades. We also started hearing them in the family room next to the AC.

    Had a company come out that focuses on stopping them from coming in by be plugging holes with caulk and wire mesh. Not cheap.

    Great except that traps the ones still inside. Their solution to that is to create a kill box where they set traps wherever they might be looking to get out; which I'm my case is the basement. So now we've got mice coming into the living space where before they were happy just using the crawl spaces.

    So caught 4 so far. Including one while I'm down here eating lunch.

    Also the traps are not always doing the job which is extra awesome having to resolve that.

    I guess this is the best way, but wife disagreed and may be spending another night at her mother's.

    So if you're looking into that kind of prevention, that's what you can expect.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Cats. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    AbsoluteZerojkylefulton
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Shitty LED bulbs rely on overvolting cheap diodes that directly lead to the problems in enclosed lamps and other premature death. Good quality bulbs have LEDs rated for the voltage they're pushing.

    There's 1 place in the world where bulbs are ACTUALLY engineered to last nearly forever. Dubai. The ruler of Dubai, Maktoum, has "inspired" new ultra efficient lighting that is currently being used in all public buildings. They're basically taking higher voltage LEDs and uvervolting them so they always run at their most efficient. The 3 Watt Dubai Lamp is capable of outputting a full 600 lumens of nice 2700k light and should ACTUALLY last for more than 25 years.

    https://www.mea.lighting.philips.com/consumer/dubai-lamp

    Wait, so does that mean I could build my own LED fixtures and they'd last longer than off-the-shelf LED lightbulbs as long as I'm mindful of voltage ratings?

    ...

    Building custom light fixtures (that can be wired into a ceiling box, not plugged into an outlet) is something I've been interested in for a while, but I can't seem to find anything that just like, "here's what you need to know" re: using LEDs with home wiring. Everything assumes you'll be plugging a voltage converter into a wall outlet. There's gotta be an equivalent part for wired fixtures... right?

    Also, why the hell are ceiling boxes still a thing anyway. Why not just put an outlet up there so an average renter can replace their own shitty apartment boob lights without starting fires? :mad:

  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit 4.5 MV of POWER! Registered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Shitty LED bulbs rely on overvolting cheap diodes that directly lead to the problems in enclosed lamps and other premature death. Good quality bulbs have LEDs rated for the voltage they're pushing.

    There's 1 place in the world where bulbs are ACTUALLY engineered to last nearly forever. Dubai. The ruler of Dubai, Maktoum, has "inspired" new ultra efficient lighting that is currently being used in all public buildings. They're basically taking higher voltage LEDs and uvervolting them so they always run at their most efficient. The 3 Watt Dubai Lamp is capable of outputting a full 600 lumens of nice 2700k light and should ACTUALLY last for more than 25 years.

    https://www.mea.lighting.philips.com/consumer/dubai-lamp

    Wait, so does that mean I could build my own LED fixtures and they'd last longer than off-the-shelf LED lightbulbs as long as I'm mindful of voltage ratings?

    ...

    Building custom light fixtures (that can be wired into a ceiling box, not plugged into an outlet) is something I've been interested in for a while, but I can't seem to find anything that just like, "here's what you need to know" re: using LEDs with home wiring. Everything assumes you'll be plugging a voltage converter into a wall outlet. There's gotta be an equivalent part for wired fixtures... right?

    Also, why the hell are ceiling boxes still a thing anyway. Why not just put an outlet up there so an average renter can replace their own shitty apartment boob lights without starting fires? :mad:

    1) You can, but remember no insurance company will pay a dime if one of your home built bulbs/fixtures burns the place down.

    2) Ceiling boxes support the weight of the fixture. People would almost certainly install a fixture wrong and end up hospitalized when several pounds of metal and glass smacks them in the head. If you want a metaphorical Sword of Damocles hanging over you every time you wash dishes, go for it. I'll take the boob lights.

    Steam - Synthetic Violence | XBOX Live - Cannonfuse | PSN - CastleBravo | Twitch - SoggybiscuitPA
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Shitty LED bulbs rely on overvolting cheap diodes that directly lead to the problems in enclosed lamps and other premature death. Good quality bulbs have LEDs rated for the voltage they're pushing.

    There's 1 place in the world where bulbs are ACTUALLY engineered to last nearly forever. Dubai. The ruler of Dubai, Maktoum, has "inspired" new ultra efficient lighting that is currently being used in all public buildings. They're basically taking higher voltage LEDs and uvervolting them so they always run at their most efficient. The 3 Watt Dubai Lamp is capable of outputting a full 600 lumens of nice 2700k light and should ACTUALLY last for more than 25 years.

    https://www.mea.lighting.philips.com/consumer/dubai-lamp

    Wait, so does that mean I could build my own LED fixtures and they'd last longer than off-the-shelf LED lightbulbs as long as I'm mindful of voltage ratings?

    ...

    Building custom light fixtures (that can be wired into a ceiling box, not plugged into an outlet) is something I've been interested in for a while, but I can't seem to find anything that just like, "here's what you need to know" re: using LEDs with home wiring. Everything assumes you'll be plugging a voltage converter into a wall outlet. There's gotta be an equivalent part for wired fixtures... right?

    Also, why the hell are ceiling boxes still a thing anyway. Why not just put an outlet up there so an average renter can replace their own shitty apartment boob lights without starting fires? :mad:

    1) You can, but remember no insurance company will pay a dime if one of your home built bulbs/fixtures burns the place down.

    2) Ceiling boxes support the weight of the fixture. People would almost certainly install a fixture wrong and end up hospitalized when several pounds of metal and glass smacks them in the head. If you want a metaphorical Sword of Damocles hanging over you every time you wash dishes, go for it. I'll take the boob lights.

    Not really metaphorical, is it?

    Anyway, the reputable manufacturers will put bulb lifetime somewhere. Just double-check that when you buy. I think overpowering LEDs are mostly an issue in shitty eBay specials.

  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit 4.5 MV of POWER! Registered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Shitty LED bulbs rely on overvolting cheap diodes that directly lead to the problems in enclosed lamps and other premature death. Good quality bulbs have LEDs rated for the voltage they're pushing.

    There's 1 place in the world where bulbs are ACTUALLY engineered to last nearly forever. Dubai. The ruler of Dubai, Maktoum, has "inspired" new ultra efficient lighting that is currently being used in all public buildings. They're basically taking higher voltage LEDs and uvervolting them so they always run at their most efficient. The 3 Watt Dubai Lamp is capable of outputting a full 600 lumens of nice 2700k light and should ACTUALLY last for more than 25 years.

    https://www.mea.lighting.philips.com/consumer/dubai-lamp

    Wait, so does that mean I could build my own LED fixtures and they'd last longer than off-the-shelf LED lightbulbs as long as I'm mindful of voltage ratings?

    ...

    Building custom light fixtures (that can be wired into a ceiling box, not plugged into an outlet) is something I've been interested in for a while, but I can't seem to find anything that just like, "here's what you need to know" re: using LEDs with home wiring. Everything assumes you'll be plugging a voltage converter into a wall outlet. There's gotta be an equivalent part for wired fixtures... right?

    Also, why the hell are ceiling boxes still a thing anyway. Why not just put an outlet up there so an average renter can replace their own shitty apartment boob lights without starting fires? :mad:

    1) You can, but remember no insurance company will pay a dime if one of your home built bulbs/fixtures burns the place down.

    2) Ceiling boxes support the weight of the fixture. People would almost certainly install a fixture wrong and end up hospitalized when several pounds of metal and glass smacks them in the head. If you want a metaphorical Sword of Damocles hanging over you every time you wash dishes, go for it. I'll take the boob lights.

    Not really metaphorical, is it?

    Anyway, the reputable manufacturers will put bulb lifetime somewhere. Just double-check that when you buy. I think overpowering LEDs are mostly an issue in shitty eBay specials.

    Yes and no? It's not a sword, but it does have a point.

    Steam - Synthetic Violence | XBOX Live - Cannonfuse | PSN - CastleBravo | Twitch - SoggybiscuitPA
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    edited September 22
    Is there a certification process for homebuilt light fixtures? Like, if I wanted to sell stuff on Etsy (I don't; this is just a hypothetical), is there a way to 1) make sure and 2) legally guarantee that my products meet safety codes?

    And if there isn't, then how do people sell lamps on Etsy?
    Calica wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Shitty LED bulbs rely on overvolting cheap diodes that directly lead to the problems in enclosed lamps and other premature death. Good quality bulbs have LEDs rated for the voltage they're pushing.

    There's 1 place in the world where bulbs are ACTUALLY engineered to last nearly forever. Dubai. The ruler of Dubai, Maktoum, has "inspired" new ultra efficient lighting that is currently being used in all public buildings. They're basically taking higher voltage LEDs and uvervolting them so they always run at their most efficient. The 3 Watt Dubai Lamp is capable of outputting a full 600 lumens of nice 2700k light and should ACTUALLY last for more than 25 years.

    https://www.mea.lighting.philips.com/consumer/dubai-lamp

    Wait, so does that mean I could build my own LED fixtures and they'd last longer than off-the-shelf LED lightbulbs as long as I'm mindful of voltage ratings?

    ...

    Building custom light fixtures (that can be wired into a ceiling box, not plugged into an outlet) is something I've been interested in for a while, but I can't seem to find anything that just like, "here's what you need to know" re: using LEDs with home wiring. Everything assumes you'll be plugging a voltage converter into a wall outlet. There's gotta be an equivalent part for wired fixtures... right?

    Also, why the hell are ceiling boxes still a thing anyway. Why not just put an outlet up there so an average renter can replace their own shitty apartment boob lights without starting fires? :mad:

    1) You can, but remember no insurance company will pay a dime if one of your home built bulbs/fixtures burns the place down.

    2) Ceiling boxes support the weight of the fixture. People would almost certainly install a fixture wrong and end up hospitalized when several pounds of metal and glass smacks them in the head. If you want a metaphorical Sword of Damocles hanging over you every time you wash dishes, go for it. I'll take the boob lights.

    I'm talking about the electrical connection itself. Obviously lamps aren't attached to the ceiling by wires and electrical tape :tell_me_more:

    Calica on
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    By buying UL-tested parts for the electrical parts, and just home making the non-functional parts around them.

    CalicaDaenris
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    If you want ideas for custom LED based light fixtures, check out BigClive's channel. He's made all manner of stuff.

    https://www.youtube.com/c/Bigclive

    CalicaPailryder
  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    And even high priced designer light fixtures are often designed with shitty heat management. Kinda similar to prebuilt computers actually.

    ElvenshaeMichaelLC
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    By buying UL-tested parts for the electrical parts, and just home making the non-functional parts around them.

    To expand on this a bit and provide an actual example, I'm making a lamp for my family (slowly).

    I bought one of these:

    kylqts8np28c.png

    ... and am just making the panels out of stained glass. The electrical parts all carry UL stickers, etc. Then I just need to make sure my chosen bulbs meet the rating, and we're good to go!

    evilmrhenryGilgaronShadowfire
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Hey folks. I have joined the homeowner's club and I am very excited, despite how expensive everything is.

    I was wondering if any of you have had the experience of hiring someone to install a water softener? The internet suggests this is something we could potentially do ourselves, but we are a little DIY'd out after going pretty hard fixing up the place for the last month.

    We're in a 2 bathroom house in Austin. It seems like water softening ranges from 200 dollar bins of salt, to 9000 dollar systems with multiple filtration types. I'm hoping to find a person to come and install something for me, but it seems like most companies are basically vendors for one single brand of equipment, is that normal?

    Just trying to figure out if this is a small enough job that I can go through a big box hardware store and trust their contracted installer, or if I need to seek out a private vendor. I'm a little worried about falling for a crazy upsell on a system we don't need or wont last.

    Stabbity Style
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    Hey folks. I have joined the homeowner's club and I am very excited, despite how expensive everything is.

    I was wondering if any of you have had the experience of hiring someone to install a water softener? The internet suggests this is something we could potentially do ourselves, but we are a little DIY'd out after going pretty hard fixing up the place for the last month.

    We're in a 2 bathroom house in Austin. It seems like water softening ranges from 200 dollar bins of salt, to 9000 dollar systems with multiple filtration types. I'm hoping to find a person to come and install something for me, but it seems like most companies are basically vendors for one single brand of equipment, is that normal?

    Just trying to figure out if this is a small enough job that I can go through a big box hardware store and trust their contracted installer, or if I need to seek out a private vendor. I'm a little worried about falling for a crazy upsell on a system we don't need or wont last.

    It really depends on the age of the existing plumbing and how bad the water is. Id get it independently tested before taking the next steps.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    The house was built in the 80s, not sure how much of the plumbing is original though, at least one bathroom was renovated in the last round, and it seems like the majority of that reno job was done in 2007.

    Water all over austin is hard as hell, apparently we have some of the hardest in the country. Getting it tested doesn't seem like a bad idea, but is the test just to determine that its hard? Cause we already have the telltale signs that it is, with spots on our fixtures and whatnot.

  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    The house was built in the 80s, not sure how much of the plumbing is original though, at least one bathroom was renovated in the last round, and it seems like the majority of that reno job was done in 2007.

    Water all over austin is hard as hell, apparently we have some of the hardest in the country. Getting it tested doesn't seem like a bad idea, but is the test just to determine that its hard? Cause we already have the telltale signs that it is, with spots on our fixtures and whatnot.

    If you're doing plumbing DIY it's all about access and bail out plans. If this job takes more then 1 day, you will not have water and that makes a house unliveable real quick.

    What you want to do is find out where your shutoff is and where the pipes enter the house in an accessible way. The key question is whether there's straight sections - plumbing fittings need straight pipe to grip securely, if someone has done (as they did my house) where they just pipe bended everywhere that wasn't the original plumbing you'll have a rough time.

    My advice: you want to give yourself a main's water bypass to whatever filtering or treatment you're about to add. This as two advantages: during installation you can take as long as you need since you still have water. But also, when you need to replace filters/electrodes/whatever - you can switch the water over to your bypass line which again let's you not interrupt you water if something goes wrong.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    edited September 26
    Iruka wrote: »
    The house was built in the 80s, not sure how much of the plumbing is original though, at least one bathroom was renovated in the last round, and it seems like the majority of that reno job was done in 2007.

    Water all over austin is hard as hell, apparently we have some of the hardest in the country. Getting it tested doesn't seem like a bad idea, but is the test just to determine that its hard? Cause we already have the telltale signs that it is, with spots on our fixtures and whatnot.
    It’s a test strip that tells you how hard the water is. The cheap tests are 10 bucks. Tests from 0-1000 ppm(or mg/l) and if it’s over 180 that’s very hard you probably need a water softener 120-180 is hard but I’d save the money personally.

    zepherin on
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Thawmus wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Xzibit was our excavator.

    My neighbour is also installing a pool but he's a know-it-all and is actively out there micro-managing the team. The guy told me today that our pool will be done a full week ahead of his because he's a) very needy and b) an arsehole

    Trusting your contractors is like..rule number one. Ask for referrals and talk to your team. If you trust them just let them do their jobs.

    If you don't trust them go back to rule number one!

    Yup, asked a contractor this morning if it'd be too much trouble to get a door switched around to open the other way.

    "Yeah, we'd have to do this this and this."

    "Okay nvm then I can live with it as is, I'm going to work, getting out of your hair, have a good day."

    IMO this is one of the most important skills a general contractor can have - and one a lot of regular tradespeople lack.

    Essentially, if I have an idea for something I just want for you to talk me through the options, dependencies, and alternatives so that I can make an informed decision.

    I tell my contractors two things up front.

    1. Tell me if I'm about to do something stupid / regrettable to my house.
    2. Tell me if there's something
    Iruka wrote: »
    Hey folks. I have joined the homeowner's club and I am very excited, despite how expensive everything is.

    I was wondering if any of you have had the experience of hiring someone to install a water softener? The internet suggests this is something we could potentially do ourselves, but we are a little DIY'd out after going pretty hard fixing up the place for the last month.

    We're in a 2 bathroom house in Austin. It seems like water softening ranges from 200 dollar bins of salt, to 9000 dollar systems with multiple filtration types. I'm hoping to find a person to come and install something for me, but it seems like most companies are basically vendors for one single brand of equipment, is that normal?

    Just trying to figure out if this is a small enough job that I can go through a big box hardware store and trust their contracted installer, or if I need to seek out a private vendor. I'm a little worried about falling for a crazy upsell on a system we don't need or wont last.

    I think you may be confusing two things.

    A water softener is just the bin of salt and the attached cylinder, it doesn't filter anything.

    Then there are systems with multiple attached filters that do other stuff that aren't related to water softeners.

    For example, I live in a house on our own well and we installed a new water softener, a twin tank iron filter, and reverse osmosis filter for like $5,000 two years ago.

    I would test your water and if it's just the hardness you want to fix then just use the big box installer.

    Though, one last thought, you've got a new house and it's not a bad idea to vet a plumber with a smaller job so you have a relationship for when s bigger problem arrives.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    The house was built in the 80s, not sure how much of the plumbing is original though, at least one bathroom was renovated in the last round, and it seems like the majority of that reno job was done in 2007.

    Water all over austin is hard as hell, apparently we have some of the hardest in the country. Getting it tested doesn't seem like a bad idea, but is the test just to determine that its hard? Cause we already have the telltale signs that it is, with spots on our fixtures and whatnot.

    If you're doing plumbing DIY it's all about access and bail out plans. If this job takes more then 1 day, you will not have water and that makes a house unliveable real quick.

    What you want to do is find out where your shutoff is and where the pipes enter the house in an accessible way. The key question is whether there's straight sections - plumbing fittings need straight pipe to grip securely, if someone has done (as they did my house) where they just pipe bended everywhere that wasn't the original plumbing you'll have a rough time.

    My advice: you want to give yourself a main's water bypass to whatever filtering or treatment you're about to add. This as two advantages: during installation you can take as long as you need since you still have water. But also, when you need to replace filters/electrodes/whatever - you can switch the water over to your bypass line which again let's you not interrupt you water if something goes wrong.

    The other bonus is you can shut off the water for only a few hours if you do it this way. You add some valves and the stubs for the softener, then you can turn the water back on.

    Also fwiw, many plumbers have gone to PEX over soldered joints. While fast and cheap, it involves running flex lines off of hard pipe and it can get unruly quickly. Not a huge deal but something to remember.

    Also, PEX/Sharkbite is pretty simple to do yourself.

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Thawmus wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Xzibit was our excavator.

    My neighbour is also installing a pool but he's a know-it-all and is actively out there micro-managing the team. The guy told me today that our pool will be done a full week ahead of his because he's a) very needy and b) an arsehole

    Trusting your contractors is like..rule number one. Ask for referrals and talk to your team. If you trust them just let them do their jobs.

    If you don't trust them go back to rule number one!

    Yup, asked a contractor this morning if it'd be too much trouble to get a door switched around to open the other way.

    "Yeah, we'd have to do this this and this."

    "Okay nvm then I can live with it as is, I'm going to work, getting out of your hair, have a good day."

    IMO this is one of the most important skills a general contractor can have - and one a lot of regular tradespeople lack.

    Essentially, if I have an idea for something I just want for you to talk me through the options, dependencies, and alternatives so that I can make an informed decision.

    I tell my contractors two things up front.

    1. Tell me if I'm about to do something stupid / regrettable to my house.
    2. Tell me if there's something
    Iruka wrote: »
    Hey folks. I have joined the homeowner's club and I am very excited, despite how expensive everything is.

    I was wondering if any of you have had the experience of hiring someone to install a water softener? The internet suggests this is something we could potentially do ourselves, but we are a little DIY'd out after going pretty hard fixing up the place for the last month.

    We're in a 2 bathroom house in Austin. It seems like water softening ranges from 200 dollar bins of salt, to 9000 dollar systems with multiple filtration types. I'm hoping to find a person to come and install something for me, but it seems like most companies are basically vendors for one single brand of equipment, is that normal?

    Just trying to figure out if this is a small enough job that I can go through a big box hardware store and trust their contracted installer, or if I need to seek out a private vendor. I'm a little worried about falling for a crazy upsell on a system we don't need or wont last.

    I think you may be confusing two things.

    A water softener is just the bin of salt and the attached cylinder, it doesn't filter anything.

    Then there are systems with multiple attached filters that do other stuff that aren't related to water softeners.

    For example, I live in a house on our own well and we installed a new water softener, a twin tank iron filter, and reverse osmosis filter for like $5,000 two years ago.

    I would test your water and if it's just the hardness you want to fix then just use the big box installer.

    Though, one last thought, you've got a new house and it's not a bad idea to vet a plumber with a smaller job so you have a relationship for when s bigger problem arrives.

    I was thinking that I might also want to filter the water so I don't have to keep a supply of distilled water around for the plants if we soften the water. Also every blog about water softening goes into all of these options at once, so its difficult to avoid considering it if you have no idea where to start.

    When you got your system installed, how did you choose your vendor?

    There's a secondary few small things we could ask a plumber to look at when they came through to start forming a relationship. Our kitchen sink was flagged in our home inspection as being poorly installed, and our dishwasher seems to be having trouble draining because of it.

    Of all the diy I'm prepared to do, plumbing is the most foreign to me now, after 14 years of apartment living, so I'd be happy to work with a company for now until I have more understanding around the dos and don't.

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    Today's job: Frenching

    Old door out, and wiring moved. Previously it was all where that single romex hanging down is. That went to a wall sconce on the outside that is going away.

    32VxyB0.jpg?1

    Old header out, new king and jack studs in for the new header,

    i5ev5dd.jpg?1

    Bigger than before.

    QJPaNCd.jpg?1


    Also a better view of the crap job they did. That's the sill plate up top, and the anchor bolt positioning in the foundation.

    9KP1w3n.jpg?1


    MugsleyStarZapperthatassemblyguyDisruptedCapitalistDoodmannElvenshaeSporkAndrew
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    It's definitely a Homeowner Special but it's done and it drains. I need to get a polishing wheel to remove the roughness.

    The $40 "Craftsman" 4.5" grinder worked a treat! That was actually pretty fun.
    xs69wnhg681w.jpg

    Elvenshae
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    @matt has a problem am I correct that you shouldn't be able to see daylight on the last pic, if it were built right?

  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Thawmus wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Xzibit was our excavator.

    My neighbour is also installing a pool but he's a know-it-all and is actively out there micro-managing the team. The guy told me today that our pool will be done a full week ahead of his because he's a) very needy and b) an arsehole

    Trusting your contractors is like..rule number one. Ask for referrals and talk to your team. If you trust them just let them do their jobs.

    If you don't trust them go back to rule number one!

    Yup, asked a contractor this morning if it'd be too much trouble to get a door switched around to open the other way.

    "Yeah, we'd have to do this this and this."

    "Okay nvm then I can live with it as is, I'm going to work, getting out of your hair, have a good day."

    IMO this is one of the most important skills a general contractor can have - and one a lot of regular tradespeople lack.

    Essentially, if I have an idea for something I just want for you to talk me through the options, dependencies, and alternatives so that I can make an informed decision.

    I tell my contractors two things up front.

    1. Tell me if I'm about to do something stupid / regrettable to my house.
    2. Tell me if there's something
    Iruka wrote: »
    Hey folks. I have joined the homeowner's club and I am very excited, despite how expensive everything is.

    I was wondering if any of you have had the experience of hiring someone to install a water softener? The internet suggests this is something we could potentially do ourselves, but we are a little DIY'd out after going pretty hard fixing up the place for the last month.

    We're in a 2 bathroom house in Austin. It seems like water softening ranges from 200 dollar bins of salt, to 9000 dollar systems with multiple filtration types. I'm hoping to find a person to come and install something for me, but it seems like most companies are basically vendors for one single brand of equipment, is that normal?

    Just trying to figure out if this is a small enough job that I can go through a big box hardware store and trust their contracted installer, or if I need to seek out a private vendor. I'm a little worried about falling for a crazy upsell on a system we don't need or wont last.

    I think you may be confusing two things.

    A water softener is just the bin of salt and the attached cylinder, it doesn't filter anything.

    Then there are systems with multiple attached filters that do other stuff that aren't related to water softeners.

    For example, I live in a house on our own well and we installed a new water softener, a twin tank iron filter, and reverse osmosis filter for like $5,000 two years ago.

    I would test your water and if it's just the hardness you want to fix then just use the big box installer.

    Though, one last thought, you've got a new house and it's not a bad idea to vet a plumber with a smaller job so you have a relationship for when s bigger problem arrives.

    I was thinking that I might also want to filter the water so I don't have to keep a supply of distilled water around for the plants if we soften the water. Also every blog about water softening goes into all of these options at once, so its difficult to avoid considering it if you have no idea where to start.

    When you got your system installed, how did you choose your vendor?

    There's a secondary few small things we could ask a plumber to look at when they came through to start forming a relationship. Our kitchen sink was flagged in our home inspection as being poorly installed, and our dishwasher seems to be having trouble draining because of it.

    Of all the diy I'm prepared to do, plumbing is the most foreign to me now, after 14 years of apartment living, so I'd be happy to work with a company for now until I have more understanding around the dos and don't.

    We went with Culligan because they had an discount of 10% for my employer for whatever reason, but any plumber should be able to do it for in a half a day or so.

    Ask around for recs in your area. Bad news travels fast with contractors of all kind so it shouldn't be hard to find someone reliable.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    "matt has a problem" am I correct that you shouldn't be able to see daylight on the last pic, if it were built right?

    Correct, it is customary to frame the house actually on the foundation, as opposed to these builders who I can only assume were formerly circus performers and decided to perform a balancing act with the walls...

    MugsleyHappylilElfPhoenix-DDoodmannShadowfireAegisAbsoluteZeroElvenshae
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    When my water softener shit the bed I went to Home Depot, bought a new one and brought it home. You can Google how to correctly size a water softener for your water hardness and usage level, it's fairly straightforward. I goddamn hate test strips though. I recommend using a titration test kit (this is the one I use: Hach 145300 Total Hardness Test Kit, Model 5-B).

    I hired a plumber to remove and haul away the old water softener and install the new one. Just keep in mind the plumber might cost like 3x as much as the water softener did, but you won't have to worry about it being done wrong. Also your local codes might require a permit (which likely means an inspection too), whether you install it yourself or not.

  • thatassemblyguythatassemblyguy Technical Debt Janitor he/himRegistered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Thawmus wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Xzibit was our excavator.

    My neighbour is also installing a pool but he's a know-it-all and is actively out there micro-managing the team. The guy told me today that our pool will be done a full week ahead of his because he's a) very needy and b) an arsehole

    Trusting your contractors is like..rule number one. Ask for referrals and talk to your team. If you trust them just let them do their jobs.

    If you don't trust them go back to rule number one!

    Yup, asked a contractor this morning if it'd be too much trouble to get a door switched around to open the other way.

    "Yeah, we'd have to do this this and this."

    "Okay nvm then I can live with it as is, I'm going to work, getting out of your hair, have a good day."

    IMO this is one of the most important skills a general contractor can have - and one a lot of regular tradespeople lack.

    Essentially, if I have an idea for something I just want for you to talk me through the options, dependencies, and alternatives so that I can make an informed decision.

    I tell my contractors two things up front.

    1. Tell me if I'm about to do something stupid / regrettable to my house.
    2. Tell me if there's something
    Iruka wrote: »
    Hey folks. I have joined the homeowner's club and I am very excited, despite how expensive everything is.

    I was wondering if any of you have had the experience of hiring someone to install a water softener? The internet suggests this is something we could potentially do ourselves, but we are a little DIY'd out after going pretty hard fixing up the place for the last month.

    We're in a 2 bathroom house in Austin. It seems like water softening ranges from 200 dollar bins of salt, to 9000 dollar systems with multiple filtration types. I'm hoping to find a person to come and install something for me, but it seems like most companies are basically vendors for one single brand of equipment, is that normal?

    Just trying to figure out if this is a small enough job that I can go through a big box hardware store and trust their contracted installer, or if I need to seek out a private vendor. I'm a little worried about falling for a crazy upsell on a system we don't need or wont last.

    I think you may be confusing two things.

    A water softener is just the bin of salt and the attached cylinder, it doesn't filter anything.

    Then there are systems with multiple attached filters that do other stuff that aren't related to water softeners.

    For example, I live in a house on our own well and we installed a new water softener, a twin tank iron filter, and reverse osmosis filter for like $5,000 two years ago.

    I would test your water and if it's just the hardness you want to fix then just use the big box installer.

    Though, one last thought, you've got a new house and it's not a bad idea to vet a plumber with a smaller job so you have a relationship for when s bigger problem arrives.

    I was thinking that I might also want to filter the water so I don't have to keep a supply of distilled water around for the plants if we soften the water. Also every blog about water softening goes into all of these options at once, so its difficult to avoid considering it if you have no idea where to start.
    When you got your system installed, how did you choose your vendor?

    There's a secondary few small things we could ask a plumber to look at when they came through to start forming a relationship. Our kitchen sink was flagged in our home inspection as being poorly installed, and our dishwasher seems to be having trouble draining because of it.

    Of all the diy I'm prepared to do, plumbing is the most foreign to me now, after 14 years of apartment living, so I'd be happy to work with a company for now until I have more understanding around the dos and don't.

    As an additional thought, depending on what you're trying to do, a set of filters right after the water softener loop will effectively make filtered water in every tap - which might be a waste. If the water treatment in your area is good enough, it could be more cost effective to look into an under-the-sink RO system as a filter option for main drinking/cooking water + plant water.

    Iruka
Sign In or Register to comment.