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Against Everyone’s Better Judgement The [Movie] Thread is Open

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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    Gustav wrote: »
    I remember reading a book as a kid about a bunch of Tolkien-esque Orcs discovering like a cache of US Military weapons in their fantasy kingdom. And they decided they were sick of getting a raw deal in the war of good and evil and just start mowing down elves and knights with machine guns in graphic detail. There were also hobbits that like were serial killers and child murderers. Also in graphic detail

    But Im also like 50 percent sure that was a fever dream

    You speak of Grunts! by Mary Gentle and oh my god, why was this book in my junior high library?

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    GustavGustav Friend of Goats Somewhere in the OzarksRegistered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    Gustav wrote: »
    I remember reading a book as a kid about a bunch of Tolkien-esque Orcs discovering like a cache of US Military weapons in their fantasy kingdom. And they decided they were sick of getting a raw deal in the war of good and evil and just start mowing down elves and knights with machine guns in graphic detail. There were also hobbits that like were serial killers and child murderers. Also in graphic detail

    But Im also like 50 percent sure that was a fever dream
    220px-Grunts%21.jpg

    holy shit it is real

    though i had this cover

    10585212.jpg

    aGPmIBD.jpg
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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2020
    My father (I think?) bought me Grunts! randomly when I was 12 or so and wow was that a misfire. I don't think I read more than a third (and at that age I read everything, including (bafflingly) The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy).

    anyway I don't trust my 12 year old self one bit, is it actually any good?

    tynic on
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    StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    When I was like... nine or ten maybe, my spooky aunt moved to the other side of the country, and when she did, she left her copies of the Vampire Chronicles for my dad.

    He never read them, and a couple of years later I picked them up and read one and a half of them before giving up.

    I later told her this story, and she told me that:
    A. She knew my dad wasn't going to read them, she was actually leaving them for me but I was still a bit too young for them so she didn't want to do so directly.
    B. She also did not enjoy them and stopped halfway through LeStat.

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    GustavGustav Friend of Goats Somewhere in the OzarksRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    My father (I think?) bought me Grunts! randomly when I was 12 or so and wow was that a misfire. I don't think I read more than a third (and at that age I read everything, including (bafflingly) The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy).

    anyway I don't trust my 12 year old self one bit, is it actually any good?

    My memory is that i never finished it because it was stupid but I was also in the 10-13 bracket so who knows

    I do remember that the galadriel figure had like slobbering mucus that just spit all over people as it drained from their face though

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    astrobstrdastrobstrd So full of mercy... Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    The fifth grade book report that prompted a parent-teacher conference.
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    astrobstrd on
    Selling the Scream Podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeremy-donaldson
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    PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    Gustav wrote: »
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    Gustav wrote: »
    I remember reading a book as a kid about a bunch of Tolkien-esque Orcs discovering like a cache of US Military weapons in their fantasy kingdom. And they decided they were sick of getting a raw deal in the war of good and evil and just start mowing down elves and knights with machine guns in graphic detail. There were also hobbits that like were serial killers and child murderers. Also in graphic detail

    But Im also like 50 percent sure that was a fever dream
    220px-Grunts%21.jpg

    holy shit it is real

    though i had this cover

    10585212.jpg

    It's sort of a forgotten series these days, but Mary Gentle's Ash books are one of the best epic fantasies out there.

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    GustavGustav Friend of Goats Somewhere in the OzarksRegistered User regular
    I got into trouble at more than one elementary show and tell for showing gross pictures from x-files and horror movie magazines

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    DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator, Administrator admin
    Animorphs taught me some shit about the horrors of war

    Kids (including tweens) always think that being a child soldier magical girl/giant robot pilot/secret alien fighter would be so cool and awesome and fun, and the media marketed to them is usually carefully, selectively cut to show them only the exciting parts without everything that makes adults recoil in horror (and hug their own children more tightly) at the very idea.
    Usually.

    The interesting thing is that the exceptions to this seem to linger the longest in kids' minds, and are often really popular. Animorphs is an obvious example, but the Hunger Games doesn't hold back on the damage that world can do to a person. Even Harry Potter has an entire book where the lead character is traumatized by his first real brush with war

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    PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    Getting shit from English teachers for reading the "wrong" stuff is definitely a formative experience for people who actually enjoy reading. I was a SF, Stephen King-style horror fan and got a ton of grief from middle and high school English teachers for reading the wrong stuff, when the majority of my classmates weren't reading anything.

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    N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    I don't think I have ever policed what my students were reading for "appropriateness." Hell, I've even managed to engage with them over books that are just bad quality books, which was difficult. hahaha What I have done is absolutely let a kiddo hide a magic-filled book they were reading at the private school where I taught behind a much more innocuous paper book cover. Let kids read the things. Yes, it may prompt uncomfortable convos, and I have definitely had some moments pauses about the emotional development of students based on their preferred genres, but engagement is always so, so much better that discouragement or censuring.

    Anyway.

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    PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    N1tSt4lker wrote: »
    I don't think I have ever policed what my students were reading for "appropriateness." Hell, I've even managed to engage with them over books that are just bad quality books, which was difficult. hahaha What I have done is absolutely let a kiddo hide a magic-filled book they were reading at the private school where I taught behind a much more innocuous paper book cover. Let kids read the things. Yes, it may prompt uncomfortable convos, and I have definitely had some moments pauses about the emotional development of students based on their preferred genres, but engagement is always so, so much better that discouragement or censuring.

    Anyway.

    The attitude also seems weirdly isolated to reading. By 13, most kids have moved on to adult music, movies, and TV to the point that it is a frequent complaint that those mediums cater too much to teenage tastes. The modern YA literary market does skew things, mainly by being secretly filled with some actually very good books.

    Phillishere on
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    ZonugalZonugal (He/Him) The Holiday Armadillo I'm Santa's representative for all the southern states. And Mexico!Registered User regular
    I remember reading Rage (and the other titles collected in The Bachman Books) by Stephen King in the earlier years of high school...

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    AistanAistan Tiny Bat Registered User regular
    I read A Game of Thrones in jr high. Did a book report on it.

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    sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Booger CoveRegistered User regular
    For my reading history, I can draw a pretty straight line from Goosebumps to Animorphs to Stephen King, with a brief detour at Fear Street

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    Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    I'm watching Mohawk on Shudder. I'm curious why it's on this streaming service because it's not a horror movie, but I'm still finding it interesting.

    One thing I'm surprised by is that, while the Americans are the bad guys, so far they're mostly being pressured by their commander and many of them don't seem to be completely on board for what they're being made to do.

    EDIT: Okay, I'm halfway through the movie and the Americans have pretty much become the focus. I'm curious where this is going.

    Hexmage-PA on
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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    The first real books I remember reading were The Three Investigators when I was in Kindergarten followed by everything Roald Dahl wrote Then I specifically remember reading every Robotech book. At some point in middle school I got into John Grisham for some reason. Michael Crichton was mixed in there along with Dean Koontz.

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    Garlic BreadGarlic Bread i'm a bitch i'm a bitch i'm a bitch i'm a Registered User, Disagreeable regular
    i had 3 older brothers so i was always reading whatever books they had to read for school

    my 8th grade catholic school teacher deducted points from my book report on catcher in the rye because i was "too young for it"

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    webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Jedoc wrote: »
    Shorty wrote: »
    I don't think I started reading dad lit until sixth grade or so

    I also read my stepmom's secondhand paperbacks so I read a fair bit of Mom Lit as well, which is why I still have a some-might-say surprising depth of knowledge about Anne Rice books

    Not to mention Clan of the Cave Bear.

    clan of the cave bear was so goddamn horny

    Clan of the Cave Bear was in my High School Library! Along with it's sequel. Thats where I found out about it. Fucking crazy series. I will say I've probably read more YA literature as an adult than I did as a young adult. I was already reading Stephen King and Isaac Asimov and stuff by 5th grade, so I left a lot of the YA stuff behind.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
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    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    I was pretty into the YA sci-fi books of Bruce Coville as a kid, including one series where a kid's teacher is an alien in disguise, and it builds a pretty interesting universe and cast of characters over the course of 3 books. Then in the 4th book the aliens have to decide whether the Earth is redeemable or too dangerous to exist, and they take the kids back to Earth to look at some of the horrible realities of the human race. They see some dark and heavy shit.

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    I got in trouble for reading one of the Aliens vs Predator books in fifth grade. Those books were fucking cool as fuck for an 11-year-old boy!

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    KetarKetar Come on upstairs we're having a partyRegistered User regular
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    I'm watching Mohawk on Shudder. I'm curious why it's on this streaming service because it's not a horror movie, but I'm still finding it interesting.

    One thing I'm surprised by is that, while the Americans are the bad guys, so far they're mostly being pressured by their commander and many of them don't seem to be completely on board for what they're being made to do.

    EDIT: Okay, I'm halfway through the movie and the Americans have pretty much become the focus. I'm curious where this is going.

    Mohawk is absolutely a horror movie.

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    ZxerolZxerol for the smaller pieces, my shovel wouldn't do so i took off my boot and used my shoeRegistered User regular
    Back when Coville and RL Stine were the thing kids read, a couple of girls in my class had this elitist edge cuz they were into Steven King, not that kiddy Goosebumps shit. One day, I will be as cool as them.

    Decades later I still haven't read a single King book and am still hellsa uncool. Such is life.

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    Sweeney TomSweeney Tom Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    Reason #1 of 1384729375 why I will Never give up physical media unless I physically no longer have space for it

    Sweeney Tom on
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    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    Zxerol wrote: »
    Back when Coville and RL Stine were the thing kids read, a couple of girls in my class had this elitist edge cuz they were into Steven King, not that kiddy Goosebumps shit. One day, I will be as cool as them.

    Decades later I still haven't read a single King book and am still hellsa uncool. Such is life.

    I gave Steven King 1.5 books worth of Dark Tower to start making a damn lick of sense and he failed.

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Oh yeah companies have been arguing that you don't own digital content you purchase for ages.

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    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    i mean as it is I can't watch Amazon movies i've bought without using their app, and they can do whatever they want with the app, so

    it feels a little different than like back when I'd buy a song on iTunes and strip the DRM off it or whatever. Then at least I had a file that I could like... I dunno, burn onto a CD or put on a 3rd party MP3 player or something.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2020
    Mostly I don't care, because I regard streaming content as ephemeral anyway. There's one or two shows, though, where I would like to ensure I have access indefinitely, and it bugs me that companies are claiming these digital rights without always offering me a concomitant method of physical ownership.

    (I think morally it bothers me more with music, but then it's usually easier to find ways to preserve music files locally, so)

    tynic on
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    Rorshach KringleRorshach Kringle that crustache life Registered User regular
    gonna die buried in vhs tapes and beer cans

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    Ms DapperMs Dapper Yuri Librarian Registered User regular
    I hope my home looks like that house going around when I die but only full of dvds I have

    2ohWien.png
    Tumblr | Twitter PSN: misterdapper Av by Satellite_09
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    Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    Ketar wrote: »
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    I'm watching Mohawk on Shudder. I'm curious why it's on this streaming service because it's not a horror movie, but I'm still finding it interesting.

    One thing I'm surprised by is that, while the Americans are the bad guys, so far they're mostly being pressured by their commander and many of them don't seem to be completely on board for what they're being made to do.

    EDIT: Okay, I'm halfway through the movie and the Americans have pretty much become the focus. I'm curious where this is going.

    Mohawk is absolutely a horror movie.

    Mohawk was a weird movie. Some of the acting was pretty bad, but more than that I don't think the movie did enough to paint the Americans in a negative light aside from the extremely wicked American captain (at multiple points his underlings want to defy his orders before being intimidated into compliance). I'm fairly certain we also spend more time with the American soldiers and that they get more character development.

    Making the inciting incident of the movie a Mohawk man defying the wishes of his leaders and burning more than twenty Americans alive in their sleep (one of which we find out later was a boy who was afraid of the dark) was also a strange choice when it could have began with the Americans as the aggressors. Having the guy who burned a bunch of people alive, several of them boys, be one of the heroes of the movie feels odd. The movie also kind of cheats by having this act occur off-screen.

    EDIT: Honestly I'd like to read an interview with the creator to better understand how I should interpret the movie and why certain decisions were made. It at least made an impression and is making me really wonder what the takeaway was supposed to be.

    The lead actress herself, Kaniehtiio Horn, is actually of Mohawk descent and has played multiple Mohawk characters (including in one of the Assassin's Creed games), which was interesting to learn.

    Hexmage-PA on
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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    I thought Mohawk was better than Blood Quantum

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    Ms DapperMs Dapper Yuri Librarian Registered User regular
    My only knowledge of Mohawk is that a wrestler I like is in it

    2ohWien.png
    Tumblr | Twitter PSN: misterdapper Av by Satellite_09
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    astrobstrdastrobstrd So full of mercy... Registered User regular
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    Ketar wrote: »
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    I'm watching Mohawk on Shudder. I'm curious why it's on this streaming service because it's not a horror movie, but I'm still finding it interesting.

    One thing I'm surprised by is that, while the Americans are the bad guys, so far they're mostly being pressured by their commander and many of them don't seem to be completely on board for what they're being made to do.

    EDIT: Okay, I'm halfway through the movie and the Americans have pretty much become the focus. I'm curious where this is going.

    Mohawk is absolutely a horror movie.

    Mohawk was a weird movie. Some of the acting was pretty bad, but more than that I don't think the movie did enough to paint the Americans in a negative light aside from the extremely wicked American captain (at multiple points his underlings want to defy his orders before being intimidated into compliance). I'm fairly certain we also spend more time with the American soldiers and that they get more character development.

    Making the inciting incident of the movie a Mohawk man defying the wishes of his leaders and burning more than twenty Americans alive in their sleep (one of which we find out later was a boy who was afraid of the dark) was also a strange choice when it could have began with the Americans as the aggressors. Having the guy who burned a bunch of people alive, several of them boys, be one of the heroes of the movie feels strange.

    EDIT: Honestly I'd like to read an interview with the creator to better understand how I should interpret the movie and why certain decisions were made. It at least made an impression and is making me really wonder what the takeaway was supposed to be.

    The lead actress herself, Kaniehtiio Horn, is actually of Mohawk descent and has played multiple Mohawk characters (including in one of the Assassin's Creed games), which was interesting to learn.

    Ted Geoghegan has been one of the most open and supportive folks I've come across since getting active on horror Twitter. I'm sure you could ask him :).

    Selling the Scream Podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeremy-donaldson
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    Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    I thought Mohawk was better than Blood Quantum

    Maybe it is. I've amended my previous post. It's certainly making me think more than Blood Quantum did.
    astrobstrd wrote: »
    Ted Geoghegan has been one of the most open and supportive folks I've come across since getting active on horror Twitter. I'm sure you could ask him :).

    I might do that, or at least try to look and see if he's already elaborated on the film in his tweets.
    Ms Dapper wrote: »
    My only knowledge of Mohawk is that a wrestler I like is in it

    He's one of the characters in the movie who is most uncomfortable with the villainous captain's orders. The other is a fearful interpreter who really doesn't want to be there at all.
    He, along with the interpreter, are also two of the three Americans remaining at the end of the movie to be brutally killed by supernatural forces. The third is the thoroughly monstrous captain.

    I assume the message here in making the two most sympathetic Americans victims of supernatural vengeance, with all but one of the more clearly antagonistic Americans already dead from non-supernatural means, is that despite not being as bad as their deceased peers or the living captain they're still on the side of the nation that threatens the Mohawk with its existence.

    Hexmage-PA on
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    BlackDragon480BlackDragon480 Bluster Kerfuffle Master of Windy ImportRegistered User regular
    gonna die buried in vhs tapes and beer cans

    Same, though there will be some BetaMax there too.

    No matter where you go...there you are.
    ~ Buckaroo Banzai
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    TicaldfjamTicaldfjam Snoqualmie, WARegistered User regular
    Reason #1 of 1384729375 why I will Never give up physical media unless I physically no longer have space for it


    Holy shit, how the fuck are you worst than Apple at this?

    I mean, at least, for the time being , purchased movies on Apple means you digitally own them.

    Can't wait to see Amazon drop like a rock In the next few years pissing customers off.

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    KetarKetar Come on upstairs we're having a partyRegistered User regular
    Ticaldfjam wrote: »
    Reason #1 of 1384729375 why I will Never give up physical media unless I physically no longer have space for it


    Holy shit, how the fuck are you worst than Apple at this?

    I mean, at least, for the time being , purchased movies on Apple means you digitally own them.

    Can't wait to see Amazon drop like a rock In the next few years pissing customers off.

    I would be shocked if Apple doesn't have nearly identical language baked in to all digital purchases, whether you're aware of it or not.

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    Rorshach KringleRorshach Kringle that crustache life Registered User regular
    this absolutely will not hurt amazon even a little bit

    6vjsgrerts6r.png

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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    this absolutely will not hurt amazon even a little bit

    It’s like shooting the sun with a bullet

This discussion has been closed.