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Advanced Table-Top RPG Thread: 2nd Edition

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    Be a Tabaxi Monk, move over 120 feet in a single turn and eat a ranged enemy’s face @Darmak

    orc, goblin, and aarakocra are all also good choices for melee characters

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    KelorKelor Registered User regular
    Magell wrote: »
    @BahamutZERO I haven't done a ton of running my own games, but I've found the most important part is being over planned for when your players go off the rails. It's not like you need to be ready to run a different story if that's where they want to go to, but you have to know to redirect them back to the main story with whatever NPCs they are talking to.

    I think the most useful thing for running your own adventure is having index cards for each of the NPCs you have the characters talk to. Give yourself a rough idea of the character traits they have and an idea of how you want to have them interact with the players. Plus the back of the index card is a good place to make notes of how they've interacted with the characters to remember their past with them.

    A bunch of preplanned small encounters are good to have so you don't have to really improv everything and they can buy you time to come up with your next move.

    I guess what I would add to this is don’t totally over plan it either.I’m not familiar with the mechanics of Star Trek, but presumably you are staying on planets for limited amounts of time.

    Probably the most helpful thing I did when creating the world for my real life campaign was jot down a half a page on each of the nations. That fleshed it out enough for me that I was familiar with it and could spin out details when they crop up or players have questions. Those have grown since, but just knowing enough about the thing you can extrapolate on it is really valuable.

    While factions are established in Star Trek, there are still some parallels. I’d do something similar for planets perhaps. Are they exploring or visiting? Much like Magell said with NPCs, brief notes you can refer to are a handy resource to provide yourself.

    Oh! NPCs! NPC companions are wonderful! They can serve so many uses, informing players of background/history, they can create events/drama/action/betrayal, players become attached to them, be injured, kidnapped, grow ill, save the party.

    I keep a little notepad on me and jot down ideas that come to me. Then I expand them onto reference cards I can draw on when I want to make space, a bit like Magell mentioned.

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    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Went with the bugbear samurai. With 20str and a flame tongued halberd (DM approved), he can do 1d10+2d6+5+10 damage per hit. At 3-6 attacks a turn, that's not too shabby

    JtgVX0H.png
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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    bugbears are big strong boys too

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    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Yeah, and I figured a 15ft reach would be pretty cool

    JtgVX0H.png
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    BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User, Moderator mod
    Kelor wrote: »
    Magell wrote: »
    BahamutZERO I haven't done a ton of running my own games, but I've found the most important part is being over planned for when your players go off the rails. It's not like you need to be ready to run a different story if that's where they want to go to, but you have to know to redirect them back to the main story with whatever NPCs they are talking to.

    I think the most useful thing for running your own adventure is having index cards for each of the NPCs you have the characters talk to. Give yourself a rough idea of the character traits they have and an idea of how you want to have them interact with the players. Plus the back of the index card is a good place to make notes of how they've interacted with the characters to remember their past with them.

    A bunch of preplanned small encounters are good to have so you don't have to really improv everything and they can buy you time to come up with your next move.

    I guess what I would add to this is don’t totally over plan it either.I’m not familiar with the mechanics of Star Trek, but presumably you are staying on planets for limited amounts of time.

    Probably the most helpful thing I did when creating the world for my real life campaign was jot down a half a page on each of the nations. That fleshed it out enough for me that I was familiar with it and could spin out details when they crop up or players have questions. Those have grown since, but just knowing enough about the thing you can extrapolate on it is really valuable.

    While factions are established in Star Trek, there are still some parallels. I’d do something similar for planets perhaps. Are they exploring or visiting? Much like Magell said with NPCs, brief notes you can refer to are a handy resource to provide yourself.

    Oh! NPCs! NPC companions are wonderful! They can serve so many uses, informing players of background/history, they can create events/drama/action/betrayal, players become attached to them, be injured, kidnapped, grow ill, save the party.

    I keep a little notepad on me and jot down ideas that come to me. Then I expand them onto reference cards I can draw on when I want to make space, a bit like Magell mentioned.

    STA is a little different from D&D in that it's structured more like an episode of the shows. I think we had someone around here who was into it, maybe @Jacobkosh ?

    BahamutZERO.gif
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    DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Be a Tabaxi Monk, move over 120 feet in a single turn and eat a ranged enemy’s face @Darmak

    orc, goblin, and aarakocra are all also good choices for melee characters

    Halfling Monks are hilarious because you can move through squares of creatures any size larger than you without penalty.

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Be a Tabaxi Monk, move over 120 feet in a single turn and eat a ranged enemy’s face @Darmak

    orc, goblin, and aarakocra are all also good choices for melee characters

    Halfling Monks are hilarious because you can move through squares of creatures any size larger than you without penalty.

    goblins can use withdraw as a bonus action!

    if your dm allows them, as they are not legal in AL

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    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Made my samurai from Zakhara and chose far traveler for his background. Looked a little into Zakhara and I think that while I'll keep it as the character's origin, I won't make too many references to it since it seems kinda like it might be bad and racist? Like how the Kara Tur stuff is orientalist? I don't know enough about middle eastern or even eastern cultures and stuff to know precisely, but given D&D's history I'm going to try and err on the side of caution

    JtgVX0H.png
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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Be a Kobold Ranger/Rogue, and get a Deinonychus as an animal companion/mount.

    Use a bow and just always skirmish with your mount's 60ft base move and Run feat. Focus on stealth and use the Deinonychus' natural +15 stealth and your own to also get those sweet sweet ranged Sneak Attacks while also being perpetually impossible to hit.

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    Virgil_Leads_YouVirgil_Leads_You Proud Father House GardenerRegistered User regular
    Be a wizard with 8 con, and only utility spells.

    VayBJ4e.png
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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Be a wizard with 8 con, and only utility spells.

    that's all the wizards though

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Be a Kobold Ranger/Rogue, and get a Deinonychus as an animal companion/mount.

    Use a bow and just always skirmish with your mount's 60ft base move and Run feat. Focus on stealth and use the Deinonychus' natural +15 stealth and your own to also get those sweet sweet ranged Sneak Attacks while also being perpetually impossible to hit.

    animal companions are amazing dogshit awful in 5e

    EDIT: also the deinonychus is cr1, so you cannot take it as a companion

    PiptheFair on
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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Be a Kobold Ranger/Rogue, and get a Deinonychus as an animal companion/mount.

    Use a bow and just always skirmish with your mount's 60ft base move and Run feat. Focus on stealth and use the Deinonychus' natural +15 stealth and your own to also get those sweet sweet ranged Sneak Attacks while also being perpetually impossible to hit.

    animal companions are amazing dogshit awful in 5e

    EDIT: also the deinonychus is cr1, so you cannot take it as a companion

    fucking garbage useless awful shitass rules

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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Any tabletop ruleset that does not allow me as, a small lizard, to ride around on a larger lizard while being an annoying shit constantly playing the game of "you can't touch me" is not a ruleset worth playing

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    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited January 2021
    Kelor wrote: »
    Magell wrote: »
    BahamutZERO I haven't done a ton of running my own games, but I've found the most important part is being over planned for when your players go off the rails. It's not like you need to be ready to run a different story if that's where they want to go to, but you have to know to redirect them back to the main story with whatever NPCs they are talking to.

    I think the most useful thing for running your own adventure is having index cards for each of the NPCs you have the characters talk to. Give yourself a rough idea of the character traits they have and an idea of how you want to have them interact with the players. Plus the back of the index card is a good place to make notes of how they've interacted with the characters to remember their past with them.

    A bunch of preplanned small encounters are good to have so you don't have to really improv everything and they can buy you time to come up with your next move.

    I guess what I would add to this is don’t totally over plan it either.I’m not familiar with the mechanics of Star Trek, but presumably you are staying on planets for limited amounts of time.

    Probably the most helpful thing I did when creating the world for my real life campaign was jot down a half a page on each of the nations. That fleshed it out enough for me that I was familiar with it and could spin out details when they crop up or players have questions. Those have grown since, but just knowing enough about the thing you can extrapolate on it is really valuable.

    While factions are established in Star Trek, there are still some parallels. I’d do something similar for planets perhaps. Are they exploring or visiting? Much like Magell said with NPCs, brief notes you can refer to are a handy resource to provide yourself.

    Oh! NPCs! NPC companions are wonderful! They can serve so many uses, informing players of background/history, they can create events/drama/action/betrayal, players become attached to them, be injured, kidnapped, grow ill, save the party.

    I keep a little notepad on me and jot down ideas that come to me. Then I expand them onto reference cards I can draw on when I want to make space, a bit like Magell mentioned.

    STA is a little different from D&D in that it's structured more like an episode of the shows. I think we had someone around here who was into it, maybe @Jacobkosh ?

    Yo!

    Yep, I've run STA for a while now; @MsAnthropy and @Hi I'm Vee! are in the group and they can maybe chip in as well. @Hahnsoo1 has also run it!

    So what I would tell your friend is that the most important first step to coming up with original adventures for Star Trek Adventures is...to watch Star Trek. That sounds obvious, I know, but what I mean is, they should watch Star Trek in a very conscious, attentive, "what if I were GMing this" kind of way, because yeah, as you say, Bahamut, the game is meant to reproduce (and works best when you reproduce) the structure and vibe of the show. I would encourage them to watch several episodes with a way to take notes handy, and watch for how the story is structured.

    The vast, vast majority of Star Trek (and pre-2010s TV in general) stories fit the following mold: cold open, premise, twist on the premise, escalation, denouement.

    1) Cold open; a bit of characterization or table-setting before the story really kicks off. It's Riker's birthday, the Enterprise is racing to delivering medicine to a colony, Dax and Kira are meeting for coffee. The cold open ends when some kind of problem erupts: there's an explosion on the Promenade. As he's about to blow out the candle, Riker cries out! Everyone in the colony has mysteriously vanished.
    3) Premise: we learn what the episode is about, as the characters try to figure out what's going on and begin addressing the problem. There's a mad bomber on the station. The colonists have been kidnapped by the god Anubis, who challenges Kirk to a game of high-stakes Backgammon for their souls. Riker is tormented by strange visions and memories seemingly belonging to other people.
    4) Twist on the premise: the characters' understanding of the nature of the problem had been incomplete; now they know what they're up against, but everything's more urgent. The bomber is a sleeper personality programmed into Kira years ago by a telepathic member of the Resistance; the personality still thinks it's the Occupation! It's not Riker at all, but an alien who temporarily swaps places with people to explore the universe through strangers' eyes, but something went wrong and the alien forgot who he was or how to get home. Anubis wants to bring his pantheon back from the Land of the Dead and needs the colonists' bodies as new homes.
    5) Escalation: one final turn of the screw to make the situation maximally urgent. The sleeper personality has set the station's reactor to blow and the gang has only minutes to help Kira remember the past 5 years. The evil god Sebek doesn't want to honor Anubis' bargain and plans to eat the colonists' souls anyway. The alien has spent too long in our dimension and is dying, and if they die, Riker will be stranded in their home dimension forever!
    6) Denouement: the crisis has passed and our heroes have either won the day or perhaps survived to fight another day. People get a few moments to reflect on what they've been through, have some kind of poignant emotional moment or a comedy beat. Sometimes they return to the scene of the cold open (the real Riker is back and he wants his cake!).

    Literally hundreds of hours of Star Trek (and countless thousands of hours of other TV) use this basic structure. Mixed in with it, there's often a b-plot. In TOS, almost every episode had two parallel plots, one on the planet and one aboard ship; the one where Kirk and Spock were was the a-plot and got most of the screentime, but there would always be at least a couple of scenes in the other place as well. So if Kirk is on the planet dealing with the natives, then Scotty would be on the ship handling a Klingon attack; while if Kirk was on the ship, there'd be something like Sulu and Chekov trapped in a cave on the planet. In the later series, like TNG and DS9, the b-plot was often a less urgent, quieter story focusing on a specific character: while all this time travel shit is going on in the foreground, Beverly in the background is trying to cope with overwork, or O'Brien is on the outs with Keiko, or whatever.

    So what does all of this mean for someone trying to run a game?

    For me, what it means is that I try to plan stories by coming up with the premise, the twist, and the escalation. If I have those three things in hand, I have my story.

    The premise part is easy. Many RPG sourcebooks or social spaces have lists of "adventure seeds," which are almost always the premise. The STA core book has a ton of one-sentence premises, and the Division books have premises tailored for that department.

    The twist is the toughest part. It shouldn't represent a taking-away of agency from the players or a forced failure, but instead, the final piece of the puzzle. Instead of a thing that happens, try to think of it in terms of a thing the characters learn that changes the context of the events around them. As the GM, you control the information players have access to; you don't need to take agency away from the PCs if you simply time when to reveal certain things for maximum impact.

    The escalation should be a logical (if unwelcome) outcome of everything that you've set in motion up to this point. It should be the answer to the question "what's the worst that can happen?" Of COURSE the battle against the Romulans starts right as the captain is having heart surgery. Of COURSE the spy put a bomb on the warp core. As the GM, this is a good time to spend your GM resources (Threat in STA) to cause additional complications for your PCs.

    The important thing through all of this is that what you don't need to do is come up with solutions. That's the players' job. If you've done the work to create your plot outline, and you understand the situation (who did what to whom and why) and you understand how your NPCs think and feel about things and what they want, then when your players present an idea to you, you'll have a good sense of whether the idea is a good idea, super off base, or somewhere in between, and can adjudicate the game accordingly. Just focus on creating situations and practicing your improv skills so you can react to unexpected developments and you'll be good to go.

    @BahamutZERO

    Jacobkosh on
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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Any tabletop ruleset that does not allow me as, a small lizard, to ride around on a larger lizard while being an annoying shit constantly playing the game of "you can't touch me" is not a ruleset worth playing

    animal companions were nerfed because they constantly fucked with action economy

    also there are dinos you can take as companions

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    MsAnthropyMsAnthropy The Lady of Pain Breaks the Rhythm, Breaks the Rhythm, Breaks the Rhythm The City of FlowersRegistered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Kelor wrote: »
    Magell wrote: »
    BahamutZERO I haven't done a ton of running my own games, but I've found the most important part is being over planned for when your players go off the rails. It's not like you need to be ready to run a different story if that's where they want to go to, but you have to know to redirect them back to the main story with whatever NPCs they are talking to.

    I think the most useful thing for running your own adventure is having index cards for each of the NPCs you have the characters talk to. Give yourself a rough idea of the character traits they have and an idea of how you want to have them interact with the players. Plus the back of the index card is a good place to make notes of how they've interacted with the characters to remember their past with them.

    A bunch of preplanned small encounters are good to have so you don't have to really improv everything and they can buy you time to come up with your next move.

    I guess what I would add to this is don’t totally over plan it either.I’m not familiar with the mechanics of Star Trek, but presumably you are staying on planets for limited amounts of time.

    Probably the most helpful thing I did when creating the world for my real life campaign was jot down a half a page on each of the nations. That fleshed it out enough for me that I was familiar with it and could spin out details when they crop up or players have questions. Those have grown since, but just knowing enough about the thing you can extrapolate on it is really valuable.

    While factions are established in Star Trek, there are still some parallels. I’d do something similar for planets perhaps. Are they exploring or visiting? Much like Magell said with NPCs, brief notes you can refer to are a handy resource to provide yourself.

    Oh! NPCs! NPC companions are wonderful! They can serve so many uses, informing players of background/history, they can create events/drama/action/betrayal, players become attached to them, be injured, kidnapped, grow ill, save the party.

    I keep a little notepad on me and jot down ideas that come to me. Then I expand them onto reference cards I can draw on when I want to make space, a bit like Magell mentioned.

    STA is a little different from D&D in that it's structured more like an episode of the shows. I think we had someone around here who was into it, maybe @Jacobkosh ?

    Yo!

    Yep, I've run STA for a while now; @MsAnthropy and @Hi I'm Vee! are in the group and they can maybe chip in as well. @Hahnsoo1 has also run it!

    So what I would tell your friend is that the most important first step to coming up with original adventures for Star Trek Adventures is...to watch Star Trek. That sounds obvious, I know, but what I mean is, they should watch Star Trek in a very conscious, attentive, "what if I were GMing this" kind of way, because yeah, as you say, Bahamut, the game is meant to reproduce (and works best when you reproduce) the structure and vibe of the show. I would encourage them to watch several episodes with a way to take notes handy, and watch for how the story is structured.

    The vast, vast majority of Star Trek (and pre-2010s TV in general) stories fit the following mold: cold open, premise, twist on the premise, escalation, denouement.

    1) Cold open; a bit of characterization or table-setting before the story really kicks off. It's Riker's birthday, the Enterprise is racing to delivering medicine to a colony, Dax and Kira are meeting for coffee. The cold open ends when some kind of problem erupts: there's an explosion on the Promenade. As he's about to blow out the candle, Riker cries out! Everyone in the colony has mysteriously vanished.
    3) Premise: we learn what the episode is about, as the characters try to figure out what's going on and begin addressing the problem. There's a mad bomber on the station. The colonists have been kidnapped by the god Anubis, who challenges Kirk to a game of high-stakes Backgammon for their souls. Riker is tormented by strange visions and memories seemingly belonging to other people.
    4) Twist on the premise: the characters' understanding of the nature of the problem had been incomplete; now they know what they're up against, but everything's more urgent. The bomber is a sleeper personality programmed into Kira years ago by a telepathic member of the Resistance; the personality still thinks it's the Occupation! It's not Riker at all, but an alien who temporarily swaps places with people to explore the universe through strangers' eyes, but something went wrong and the alien forgot who he was or how to get home. Anubis wants to bring his pantheon back from the Land of the Dead and needs the colonists' bodies as new homes.
    5) Escalation: one final turn of the screw to make the situation maximally urgent. The sleeper personality has set the station's reactor to blow and the gang has only minutes to help Kira remember the past 5 years. The evil god Sebek doesn't want to honor Anubis' bargain and plans to eat the colonists' souls anyway. The alien has spent too long in our dimension and is dying, and if they die, Riker will be stranded in their home dimension forever!
    6) Denouement: the crisis has passed and our heroes have either won the day or perhaps survived to fight another day. People get a few moments to reflect on what they've been through, have some kind of poignant emotional moment or a comedy beat. Sometimes they return to the scene of the cold open (the real Riker is back and he wants his cake!).

    Literally hundreds of hours of Star Trek (and countless thousands of hours of other TV) use this basic structure. Mixed in with it, there's often a b-plot. In TOS, almost every episode had two parallel plots, one on the planet and one aboard ship; the one where Kirk and Spock were was the a-plot and got most of the screentime, but there would always be at least a couple of scenes in the other place as well. So if Kirk is on the planet dealing with the natives, then Scotty would be on the ship handling a Klingon attack; while if Kirk was on the ship, there'd be something like Sulu and Chekov trapped in a cave on the planet. In the later series, like TNG and DS9, the b-plot was often a less urgent, quieter story focusing on a specific character: while all this time travel shit is going on in the foreground, Beverly in the background is trying to cope with overwork, or O'Brien is on the outs with Keiko, or whatever.

    So what does all of this mean for someone trying to run a game?

    For me, what it means is that I try to plan stories by coming up with the premise, the twist, and the escalation. If I have those three things in hand, I have my story.

    The premise part is easy. Many RPG sourcebooks or social spaces have lists of "adventure seeds," which are almost always the premise. The STA core book has a ton of one-sentence premises, and the Division books have premises tailored for that department.

    The twist is the toughest part. It shouldn't represent a taking-away of agency from the players or a forced failure, but instead, the final piece of the puzzle. Instead of a thing that happens, try to think of it in terms of a thing the characters learn that changes the context of the events around them. As the GM, you control the information players have access to; you don't need to take agency away from the PCs if you simply time when to reveal certain things for maximum impact.

    The escalation should be a logical (if unwelcome) outcome of everything that you've set in motion up to this point. It should be the answer to the question "what's the worst that can happen?" Of COURSE the battle against the Romulans starts right as the captain is having heart surgery. Of COURSE the spy put a bomb on the warp core. As the GM, this is a good time to spend your GM resources (Threat in STA) to cause additional complications for your PCs.

    The important thing through all of this is that what you don't need to do is come up with solutions. That's the players' job. If you've done the work to create your plot outline, and you understand the situation (who did what to whom and why) and you understand how your NPCs think and feel about things and what they want, then when your players present an idea to you, you'll have a good sense of whether the idea is a good idea, super off base, or somewhere in between, and can adjudicate the game accordingly. Just focus on creating situations and practicing your improv skills so you can react to unexpected developments and you'll be good to go.

    @BahamutZERO

    To add on to this, the players are often a good source for B-plots (& running plots), Cold Opens, and Denouements. There are so many bits in S1 of Challenger that came from the players—with some of the best ideas coming for other players’ characters. Along those lines, having the 1-3 highest ranking characters being played by people who really know and love Star Trek, and/or have extensive DMing experience themselves is super helpful for creating the right tone and rhythm. That way you know the players who give orders aren’t going to abuse that in-game power and won’t wildly swing things outside of the setting’s themes.

    Luscious Sounds Spotify Playlist

    "The only real politics I knew was that if a guy liked Hitler, I’d beat the stuffing out of him and that would be it." -- Jack Kirby
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    BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User, Moderator mod
    MsAnthropy wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Kelor wrote: »
    Magell wrote: »
    BahamutZERO I haven't done a ton of running my own games, but I've found the most important part is being over planned for when your players go off the rails. It's not like you need to be ready to run a different story if that's where they want to go to, but you have to know to redirect them back to the main story with whatever NPCs they are talking to.

    I think the most useful thing for running your own adventure is having index cards for each of the NPCs you have the characters talk to. Give yourself a rough idea of the character traits they have and an idea of how you want to have them interact with the players. Plus the back of the index card is a good place to make notes of how they've interacted with the characters to remember their past with them.

    A bunch of preplanned small encounters are good to have so you don't have to really improv everything and they can buy you time to come up with your next move.

    I guess what I would add to this is don’t totally over plan it either.I’m not familiar with the mechanics of Star Trek, but presumably you are staying on planets for limited amounts of time.

    Probably the most helpful thing I did when creating the world for my real life campaign was jot down a half a page on each of the nations. That fleshed it out enough for me that I was familiar with it and could spin out details when they crop up or players have questions. Those have grown since, but just knowing enough about the thing you can extrapolate on it is really valuable.

    While factions are established in Star Trek, there are still some parallels. I’d do something similar for planets perhaps. Are they exploring or visiting? Much like Magell said with NPCs, brief notes you can refer to are a handy resource to provide yourself.

    Oh! NPCs! NPC companions are wonderful! They can serve so many uses, informing players of background/history, they can create events/drama/action/betrayal, players become attached to them, be injured, kidnapped, grow ill, save the party.

    I keep a little notepad on me and jot down ideas that come to me. Then I expand them onto reference cards I can draw on when I want to make space, a bit like Magell mentioned.

    STA is a little different from D&D in that it's structured more like an episode of the shows. I think we had someone around here who was into it, maybe @Jacobkosh ?

    Yo!

    Yep, I've run STA for a while now; @MsAnthropy and @Hi I'm Vee! are in the group and they can maybe chip in as well. @Hahnsoo1 has also run it!

    So what I would tell your friend is that the most important first step to coming up with original adventures for Star Trek Adventures is...to watch Star Trek. That sounds obvious, I know, but what I mean is, they should watch Star Trek in a very conscious, attentive, "what if I were GMing this" kind of way, because yeah, as you say, Bahamut, the game is meant to reproduce (and works best when you reproduce) the structure and vibe of the show. I would encourage them to watch several episodes with a way to take notes handy, and watch for how the story is structured.

    The vast, vast majority of Star Trek (and pre-2010s TV in general) stories fit the following mold: cold open, premise, twist on the premise, escalation, denouement.

    1) Cold open; a bit of characterization or table-setting before the story really kicks off. It's Riker's birthday, the Enterprise is racing to delivering medicine to a colony, Dax and Kira are meeting for coffee. The cold open ends when some kind of problem erupts: there's an explosion on the Promenade. As he's about to blow out the candle, Riker cries out! Everyone in the colony has mysteriously vanished.
    3) Premise: we learn what the episode is about, as the characters try to figure out what's going on and begin addressing the problem. There's a mad bomber on the station. The colonists have been kidnapped by the god Anubis, who challenges Kirk to a game of high-stakes Backgammon for their souls. Riker is tormented by strange visions and memories seemingly belonging to other people.
    4) Twist on the premise: the characters' understanding of the nature of the problem had been incomplete; now they know what they're up against, but everything's more urgent. The bomber is a sleeper personality programmed into Kira years ago by a telepathic member of the Resistance; the personality still thinks it's the Occupation! It's not Riker at all, but an alien who temporarily swaps places with people to explore the universe through strangers' eyes, but something went wrong and the alien forgot who he was or how to get home. Anubis wants to bring his pantheon back from the Land of the Dead and needs the colonists' bodies as new homes.
    5) Escalation: one final turn of the screw to make the situation maximally urgent. The sleeper personality has set the station's reactor to blow and the gang has only minutes to help Kira remember the past 5 years. The evil god Sebek doesn't want to honor Anubis' bargain and plans to eat the colonists' souls anyway. The alien has spent too long in our dimension and is dying, and if they die, Riker will be stranded in their home dimension forever!
    6) Denouement: the crisis has passed and our heroes have either won the day or perhaps survived to fight another day. People get a few moments to reflect on what they've been through, have some kind of poignant emotional moment or a comedy beat. Sometimes they return to the scene of the cold open (the real Riker is back and he wants his cake!).

    Literally hundreds of hours of Star Trek (and countless thousands of hours of other TV) use this basic structure. Mixed in with it, there's often a b-plot. In TOS, almost every episode had two parallel plots, one on the planet and one aboard ship; the one where Kirk and Spock were was the a-plot and got most of the screentime, but there would always be at least a couple of scenes in the other place as well. So if Kirk is on the planet dealing with the natives, then Scotty would be on the ship handling a Klingon attack; while if Kirk was on the ship, there'd be something like Sulu and Chekov trapped in a cave on the planet. In the later series, like TNG and DS9, the b-plot was often a less urgent, quieter story focusing on a specific character: while all this time travel shit is going on in the foreground, Beverly in the background is trying to cope with overwork, or O'Brien is on the outs with Keiko, or whatever.

    So what does all of this mean for someone trying to run a game?

    For me, what it means is that I try to plan stories by coming up with the premise, the twist, and the escalation. If I have those three things in hand, I have my story.

    The premise part is easy. Many RPG sourcebooks or social spaces have lists of "adventure seeds," which are almost always the premise. The STA core book has a ton of one-sentence premises, and the Division books have premises tailored for that department.

    The twist is the toughest part. It shouldn't represent a taking-away of agency from the players or a forced failure, but instead, the final piece of the puzzle. Instead of a thing that happens, try to think of it in terms of a thing the characters learn that changes the context of the events around them. As the GM, you control the information players have access to; you don't need to take agency away from the PCs if you simply time when to reveal certain things for maximum impact.

    The escalation should be a logical (if unwelcome) outcome of everything that you've set in motion up to this point. It should be the answer to the question "what's the worst that can happen?" Of COURSE the battle against the Romulans starts right as the captain is having heart surgery. Of COURSE the spy put a bomb on the warp core. As the GM, this is a good time to spend your GM resources (Threat in STA) to cause additional complications for your PCs.

    The important thing through all of this is that what you don't need to do is come up with solutions. That's the players' job. If you've done the work to create your plot outline, and you understand the situation (who did what to whom and why) and you understand how your NPCs think and feel about things and what they want, then when your players present an idea to you, you'll have a good sense of whether the idea is a good idea, super off base, or somewhere in between, and can adjudicate the game accordingly. Just focus on creating situations and practicing your improv skills so you can react to unexpected developments and you'll be good to go.

    BahamutZERO

    To add on to this, the players are often a good source for B-plots (& running plots), Cold Opens, and Denouements. There are so many bits in S1 of Challenger that came from the players—with some of the best ideas coming for other players’ characters. Along those lines, having the 1-3 highest ranking characters being played by people who really know and love Star Trek, and/or have extensive DMing experience themselves is super helpful for creating the right tone and rhythm. That way you know the players who give orders aren’t going to abuse that in-game power and won’t wildly swing things outside of the setting’s themes.

    Question about the B-plot from players idea: do you mean in the moment of the episode or drawing from their ideas and actions to set up B plots for future episodes, or both, or something else?

    BahamutZERO.gif
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    MsAnthropyMsAnthropy The Lady of Pain Breaks the Rhythm, Breaks the Rhythm, Breaks the Rhythm The City of FlowersRegistered User regular
    MsAnthropy wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Kelor wrote: »
    Magell wrote: »
    BahamutZERO I haven't done a ton of running my own games, but I've found the most important part is being over planned for when your players go off the rails. It's not like you need to be ready to run a different story if that's where they want to go to, but you have to know to redirect them back to the main story with whatever NPCs they are talking to.

    I think the most useful thing for running your own adventure is having index cards for each of the NPCs you have the characters talk to. Give yourself a rough idea of the character traits they have and an idea of how you want to have them interact with the players. Plus the back of the index card is a good place to make notes of how they've interacted with the characters to remember their past with them.

    A bunch of preplanned small encounters are good to have so you don't have to really improv everything and they can buy you time to come up with your next move.

    I guess what I would add to this is don’t totally over plan it either.I’m not familiar with the mechanics of Star Trek, but presumably you are staying on planets for limited amounts of time.

    Probably the most helpful thing I did when creating the world for my real life campaign was jot down a half a page on each of the nations. That fleshed it out enough for me that I was familiar with it and could spin out details when they crop up or players have questions. Those have grown since, but just knowing enough about the thing you can extrapolate on it is really valuable.

    While factions are established in Star Trek, there are still some parallels. I’d do something similar for planets perhaps. Are they exploring or visiting? Much like Magell said with NPCs, brief notes you can refer to are a handy resource to provide yourself.

    Oh! NPCs! NPC companions are wonderful! They can serve so many uses, informing players of background/history, they can create events/drama/action/betrayal, players become attached to them, be injured, kidnapped, grow ill, save the party.

    I keep a little notepad on me and jot down ideas that come to me. Then I expand them onto reference cards I can draw on when I want to make space, a bit like Magell mentioned.

    STA is a little different from D&D in that it's structured more like an episode of the shows. I think we had someone around here who was into it, maybe @Jacobkosh ?

    Yo!

    Yep, I've run STA for a while now; @MsAnthropy and @Hi I'm Vee! are in the group and they can maybe chip in as well. @Hahnsoo1 has also run it!

    So what I would tell your friend is that the most important first step to coming up with original adventures for Star Trek Adventures is...to watch Star Trek. That sounds obvious, I know, but what I mean is, they should watch Star Trek in a very conscious, attentive, "what if I were GMing this" kind of way, because yeah, as you say, Bahamut, the game is meant to reproduce (and works best when you reproduce) the structure and vibe of the show. I would encourage them to watch several episodes with a way to take notes handy, and watch for how the story is structured.

    The vast, vast majority of Star Trek (and pre-2010s TV in general) stories fit the following mold: cold open, premise, twist on the premise, escalation, denouement.

    1) Cold open; a bit of characterization or table-setting before the story really kicks off. It's Riker's birthday, the Enterprise is racing to delivering medicine to a colony, Dax and Kira are meeting for coffee. The cold open ends when some kind of problem erupts: there's an explosion on the Promenade. As he's about to blow out the candle, Riker cries out! Everyone in the colony has mysteriously vanished.
    3) Premise: we learn what the episode is about, as the characters try to figure out what's going on and begin addressing the problem. There's a mad bomber on the station. The colonists have been kidnapped by the god Anubis, who challenges Kirk to a game of high-stakes Backgammon for their souls. Riker is tormented by strange visions and memories seemingly belonging to other people.
    4) Twist on the premise: the characters' understanding of the nature of the problem had been incomplete; now they know what they're up against, but everything's more urgent. The bomber is a sleeper personality programmed into Kira years ago by a telepathic member of the Resistance; the personality still thinks it's the Occupation! It's not Riker at all, but an alien who temporarily swaps places with people to explore the universe through strangers' eyes, but something went wrong and the alien forgot who he was or how to get home. Anubis wants to bring his pantheon back from the Land of the Dead and needs the colonists' bodies as new homes.
    5) Escalation: one final turn of the screw to make the situation maximally urgent. The sleeper personality has set the station's reactor to blow and the gang has only minutes to help Kira remember the past 5 years. The evil god Sebek doesn't want to honor Anubis' bargain and plans to eat the colonists' souls anyway. The alien has spent too long in our dimension and is dying, and if they die, Riker will be stranded in their home dimension forever!
    6) Denouement: the crisis has passed and our heroes have either won the day or perhaps survived to fight another day. People get a few moments to reflect on what they've been through, have some kind of poignant emotional moment or a comedy beat. Sometimes they return to the scene of the cold open (the real Riker is back and he wants his cake!).

    Literally hundreds of hours of Star Trek (and countless thousands of hours of other TV) use this basic structure. Mixed in with it, there's often a b-plot. In TOS, almost every episode had two parallel plots, one on the planet and one aboard ship; the one where Kirk and Spock were was the a-plot and got most of the screentime, but there would always be at least a couple of scenes in the other place as well. So if Kirk is on the planet dealing with the natives, then Scotty would be on the ship handling a Klingon attack; while if Kirk was on the ship, there'd be something like Sulu and Chekov trapped in a cave on the planet. In the later series, like TNG and DS9, the b-plot was often a less urgent, quieter story focusing on a specific character: while all this time travel shit is going on in the foreground, Beverly in the background is trying to cope with overwork, or O'Brien is on the outs with Keiko, or whatever.

    So what does all of this mean for someone trying to run a game?

    For me, what it means is that I try to plan stories by coming up with the premise, the twist, and the escalation. If I have those three things in hand, I have my story.

    The premise part is easy. Many RPG sourcebooks or social spaces have lists of "adventure seeds," which are almost always the premise. The STA core book has a ton of one-sentence premises, and the Division books have premises tailored for that department.

    The twist is the toughest part. It shouldn't represent a taking-away of agency from the players or a forced failure, but instead, the final piece of the puzzle. Instead of a thing that happens, try to think of it in terms of a thing the characters learn that changes the context of the events around them. As the GM, you control the information players have access to; you don't need to take agency away from the PCs if you simply time when to reveal certain things for maximum impact.

    The escalation should be a logical (if unwelcome) outcome of everything that you've set in motion up to this point. It should be the answer to the question "what's the worst that can happen?" Of COURSE the battle against the Romulans starts right as the captain is having heart surgery. Of COURSE the spy put a bomb on the warp core. As the GM, this is a good time to spend your GM resources (Threat in STA) to cause additional complications for your PCs.

    The important thing through all of this is that what you don't need to do is come up with solutions. That's the players' job. If you've done the work to create your plot outline, and you understand the situation (who did what to whom and why) and you understand how your NPCs think and feel about things and what they want, then when your players present an idea to you, you'll have a good sense of whether the idea is a good idea, super off base, or somewhere in between, and can adjudicate the game accordingly. Just focus on creating situations and practicing your improv skills so you can react to unexpected developments and you'll be good to go.

    BahamutZERO

    To add on to this, the players are often a good source for B-plots (& running plots), Cold Opens, and Denouements. There are so many bits in S1 of Challenger that came from the players—with some of the best ideas coming for other players’ characters. Along those lines, having the 1-3 highest ranking characters being played by people who really know and love Star Trek, and/or have extensive DMing experience themselves is super helpful for creating the right tone and rhythm. That way you know the players who give orders aren’t going to abuse that in-game power and won’t wildly swing things outside of the setting’s themes.

    Question about the B-plot from players idea: do you mean in the moment of the episode or drawing from their ideas and actions to set up B plots for future episodes, or both, or something else?

    The latter mostly, though the seeds can be planted in play. As an example, I play the XO and my character has tensions with the Chief of Security who is a bit reckless and dealing with a mix of animosity and PTSD following the Dominion War. The security chief does some reckless things in play, and my character reprimands her and orders her to meet with the Counselor. So the next episode picks up with those therapy sessions as a B-plot, and they come up at least one other time later in the season.

    Luscious Sounds Spotify Playlist

    "The only real politics I knew was that if a guy liked Hitler, I’d beat the stuffing out of him and that would be it." -- Jack Kirby
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    GlalGlal AiredaleRegistered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Any tabletop ruleset that does not allow me as, a small lizard, to ride around on a larger lizard while being an annoying shit constantly playing the game of "you can't touch me" is not a ruleset worth playing
    animal companions were nerfed because they constantly fucked with action economy

    also there are dinos you can take as companions
    Clearly the correct answer there was "fuck the action economy".

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    gavindelgavindel The reason all your software is brokenRegistered User regular
    edited January 2021
    Oops, ignore me.

    *holds up fig branch and rolls for stealth*

    gavindel on
    Book - Royal road - Free! Seraphim === TTRPG - Wuxia - Free! Seln Alora
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    Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User, Moderator mod
    My particular game of Star Trek Adventures (on my second separate campaign right now) is run as a comedy, more related to Lower Decks or Galaxy Quest, mostly because of the composition and humor of my players. What's great is that the theme alone makes the players think like a Star Fleet officer, and they behave much differently than playing, say, Shadowrun or D&D.

    1) I would suggest, at the beginning of the session, (and this is something laid out by the pre-written scenarios) laying down some directives from Star Fleet to open. "In addition to the Prime Directive, Star Fleet has these current standing directives:". Things like "Come to the aid of any distress call" or "Provide medical relief to those who need it" or "Seek out new life and new civilizations." While this may tell your players early what the primary conflict is for your session, it helps set the tone overall for the players.

    2) Star Trek is trope-y! And this is a good thing. Often, each session can be a self-contained trope made into an episode. This can lead to horrible things like Africa Planet in "Code of Honor" in TNG, but I actually suggest leaning into it. The typical structure of an episode can often be "We go to a planet, some shit is fucked, we fix it." Think about all the cheesy things like "This is all a simulation!" or "This is the Hunger Games 2.0!" or "This is a Logan's Run planet!" and run with it. Often, a Star Trek solution to some random dystopia will be nuanced and different than what the plot would normally dictate (you won't have any players becoming Katniss Everdeen, likely), and if the players royally fuck up, there's always the option to run a big space battle and GTFO at the end. Remember that a Federation Starship has the power to not only raze a planet to the ground, but also completely overhaul a planet's economy through replicators... that's a lot of power!

    3) One of the main tensions that you can use is pitting the party's willingness and immense power to do good versus Star Fleet's overall stance of non-intervention (not just the Prime Directive, but respecting other alien cultures that aren't part of the Federation). There should always be a "Voice of Star Fleet"-type character, either as a PC or as a DM-controlled officer, that points out "This would violate the Prime Directive" or "This is a unique warp-capable culture with centuries of history, and who are we to come in like a whirlwind to intervene in their internal affairs?" It doesn't have to be the resident Vulcan (Logic can dictate that the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, etc.) or the Captain (Kirk certainly didn't care much for rules). And the PCs should be free to choose to violate those rules in the name of virtue (We have the power, so we should use it).

    4) One of the things I love the most about Star Trek Adventures is the NPC/Red Shirt system for introducing side characters for the PCs to play. We end up Stone Soup'ing the origins of the characters. I jot down some stats and disciplines for the character, and the players individually contribute one thing (a Focus, Home Planet, Alien Race, Name, etc.) to the Ensign. As a DM, I fill in the rest of the details, and now everyone has an investment in a particular character. At the end of the session, I let the players also come up with whatever bonus Focus or Talent the Ensign "learns" for participating in the adventure. We also highly encourage PCs to take control of an Ensign instead of their own characters on away teams when the plot dictates. Since ultimately, they are "burner" characters, they can use that sort of agency to take more reckless or rule-breaking actions (and either perish or get court-martialed).

    5) With genre-savvy players, you will run into the issue that they will figure out clever ways to use advanced Star Trek technology to short-circuit your plans. Transporters are the main culprit, but even the vast computing power of a Starship can easily wreck havoc. I usually just quickly burn some Threat to create some Complications (or just preset some Complications prior to the characters' arrival) to block Transporter use (at the very least, force the PCs to go down in a Shuttle first and lay down some Pattern Enhancers). Just be aware that your PCs will probably know more about Star Trek than you do. I fondly recall one scenario where one of my PCs scanned some metal for a very specific particle by name, and I was like "dwah?". It turns out that in the lore, this particle tells you if the metal was used in warp space travel.

    6) Really encourage your players to take actions that not only burn Momentum and raise Threat pools, but also to take "useless" actions to build up Momentum. The game lives and dies mechanically by how well your players are able to manipulate those pools, and they should get into the habit of doing so. Also, whenever an action is important (and the PCs may not KNOW it's important), remind them of their Determination point.

    7) Star Trek is one of the few games where I make use of music and ambient sounds. After the cold open, I play a Star Trek theme (currently, the alternate TNG opener that was never used). At the end of every session (prior to doing Milestones), I close with the closing theme of TNG. When the crew is on the Bridge, I pipe in ambient Bridge sounds. Whenever an away team beams down, I play a short transporter sound. I also usually have a spiel that the Captain reads at the beginning as a "Captain's Log, Stardate yadda yadda" written ahead of time.

    8i1dt37buh2m.png
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    PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    Captain's Log, Stardate 31415926: The ship is to play host to a delegation from X, but the replicators are on the fritz and refuse to create anything not encased in pastry...

    Steam: Polaritie
    3DS: 0473-8507-2652
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    PSN: AbEntropy
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    Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User, Moderator mod
    Polaritie wrote: »
    Captain's Log, Stardate 31415926: The ship is to play host to a delegation from X, but the replicators are on the fritz and refuse to create anything not encased in pastry...
    "I'm told that the crew has known about this for months, but they've never brought it up to anyone in engineering. This explains why my Klingon security officer now has a double chin. When I confronted him about this issue, he said, and I quote, "Today is a good day for pie!""

    8i1dt37buh2m.png
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    MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    Glal wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Any tabletop ruleset that does not allow me as, a small lizard, to ride around on a larger lizard while being an annoying shit constantly playing the game of "you can't touch me" is not a ruleset worth playing
    animal companions were nerfed because they constantly fucked with action economy

    also there are dinos you can take as companions
    Clearly the correct answer there was "fuck the action economy".

    Alright hold on for a few minutes while I control my thirty summoned creatures

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    SleepSleep Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Any tabletop ruleset that does not allow me as, a small lizard, to ride around on a larger lizard while being an annoying shit constantly playing the game of "you can't touch me" is not a ruleset worth playing

    That's why you go with the pteranodon, it has flyby attack so you can effectively just be a lancer with a rapier that never provokes opportunity attacks. When you make your flyby attack both you and your animal companion, who eventually will also be able to attack, are adjacent to the target, so sneak attack would apply.

    Sleep on
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    UrielUriel Registered User regular
    I want to play star trek adventures now...

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    SleepSleep Registered User regular
    Also yeah the obvious answer for beast master is to say, fuck the action economy, that's like explicitly what someone's trying to do by having an animal companion. Trying to avoid that fact is why every 5e beast master has been pretty shite.

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    BrainleechBrainleech 機知に富んだコメントはここにあります Registered User regular
    Uriel wrote: »
    I want to play star trek adventures now...

    I bought the books via the humble bundle and after I figured out how to cram them onto my kindle
    I want to play but I don't know what era or what

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    Hi I'm Vee!Hi I'm Vee! Formerly VH; She/Her; Is an E X P E R I E N C E Registered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    The important thing through all of this is that what you don't need to do is come up with solutions. That's the players' job. If you've done the work to create your plot outline, and you understand the situation (who did what to whom and why) and you understand how your NPCs think and feel about things and what they want, then when your players present an idea to you, you'll have a good sense of whether the idea is a good idea, super off base, or somewhere in between, and can adjudicate the game accordingly. Just focus on creating situations and practicing your improv skills so you can react to unexpected developments and you'll be good to go.

    There's a lot of good stuff in Jacob's post, but I really want to emphasize this part in particular, especially in the context of the discussion that led to it regarding over/underpreparing. I really can't stress enough how important this is, especially in an extremely narrative-heavy game like Star Trek, and especially especially in a very Star Trekky game like Star Trek. Part of what makes Jacob's game so satisfying to play in is that everybody is on the same page that we're essentially doing collaborative storytelling together, rather than trying to beat the GM or accumulate all the XP and loot or what have you. This isn't to dismiss those kinds of games, I enjoy those as well, but Star Trek in particular doesn't lend itself very well to that philosophy. The nature of the show is that solutions to the main conflict are often loosely-strung-together pieces of finely polished bullshit, but they (mostly) make sense within the rules laid out in that episode as well as the show as a whole. If you as the GM have a single solution to getting Riker back in his body (they have to tinker with a tricorder to reverse the induction array I dunno I'm bad at Treknobabble), not only is it going to be frustrating for your players if they can't find it, it also won't feel as organic. Additionally, I don't know if you have players who are less familiar with Star Trek as a whole, but as someone who definitely was one of those (and still is, though less so after watching more of it since the campaign began), it was gratifying to be able to contribute my own ideas without feeling like I had no chance of really helping to dig out the one true Star Trek related solution.

    vRyue2p.png
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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Sleep wrote: »
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Any tabletop ruleset that does not allow me as, a small lizard, to ride around on a larger lizard while being an annoying shit constantly playing the game of "you can't touch me" is not a ruleset worth playing

    That's why you go with the pteranodon, it has flyby attack so you can effectively just be a lancer with a rapier that never provokes opportunity attacks. When you make your flyby attack both you and your animal companion, who eventually will also be able to attack, are adjacent to the target, so sneak attack would apply.

    As awesome as that is, the main issue with the pterasaur is that it's a Large sized creature with 50ft clumsy fly without Run, so it's not as fast as the Deinonychus, and also unable to go into dungeons etc with the rest of the party, since Deinonychus is a medium sized creature.

    Kobold Raptor Ranger is simply able to use the defining feature of the build more often.

    Of course, the counterargument is if the DM isn't allowing you to fly around on your awesome flying dinosaur much how do they sleep at night

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    you cannot take a size large animal companion

    it has to be medium and cr 1/4 or less

    EDIT: apparently pteranadons are size M in 5e, also no such thing as clumsy flight anymore

    PiptheFair on
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    Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited January 2021
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    The important thing through all of this is that what you don't need to do is come up with solutions. That's the players' job. If you've done the work to create your plot outline, and you understand the situation (who did what to whom and why) and you understand how your NPCs think and feel about things and what they want, then when your players present an idea to you, you'll have a good sense of whether the idea is a good idea, super off base, or somewhere in between, and can adjudicate the game accordingly. Just focus on creating situations and practicing your improv skills so you can react to unexpected developments and you'll be good to go.

    There's a lot of good stuff in Jacob's post, but I really want to emphasize this part in particular, especially in the context of the discussion that led to it regarding over/underpreparing. I really can't stress enough how important this is, especially in an extremely narrative-heavy game like Star Trek, and especially especially in a very Star Trekky game like Star Trek. Part of what makes Jacob's game so satisfying to play in is that everybody is on the same page that we're essentially doing collaborative storytelling together, rather than trying to beat the GM or accumulate all the XP and loot or what have you. This isn't to dismiss those kinds of games, I enjoy those as well, but Star Trek in particular doesn't lend itself very well to that philosophy. The nature of the show is that solutions to the main conflict are often loosely-strung-together pieces of finely polished bullshit, but they (mostly) make sense within the rules laid out in that episode as well as the show as a whole. If you as the GM have a single solution to getting Riker back in his body (they have to tinker with a tricorder to reverse the induction array I dunno I'm bad at Treknobabble), not only is it going to be frustrating for your players if they can't find it, it also won't feel as organic. Additionally, I don't know if you have players who are less familiar with Star Trek as a whole, but as someone who definitely was one of those (and still is, though less so after watching more of it since the campaign began), it was gratifying to be able to contribute my own ideas without feeling like I had no chance of really helping to dig out the one true Star Trek related solution.
    In my last game, the players were on "Megacorporation Planet", in which a single corporation basically was almost in control of the state, and the board of directors of that corporation have been keeping a secret from the rest of the population in the name of profit. The out-of-box solution they came up with was taking capital donated by the state (once they revealed the Dark Secret to the planet's hegemon) and leveraging a "Nano-Second Buyout" to become majority stakeholder in the corporation (from Shadowrun, no less), making billions of stock purchases/trades using the superior computing power of their Starship and the assistance of a resident AI that they picked up along the way living in their computer core. It was a crazy and fun solution, so I rolled with it. It was quite satisfying when the Captain said "You are no longer CEO of... my company. Corporate guards... take her away."

    Hahnsoo1 on
    8i1dt37buh2m.png
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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    you cannot take a size large animal companion

    it has to be medium and cr 1/4 or less

    EDIT: apparently pteranadons are size M in 5e, also no such thing as clumsy flight anymore

    I'm admittedly talking Pathfinder; and this build requires Monstrous Companion which lets you take a fucking girallon as an animal companion provided your Leadership score is high enough.

    Which

    yeah.

    EDIT: I take that back, apparently some sick bastard decided to make a Small variant Deinonychus available as a normal animal companion (which can be boosted up to Medium size via all sorts of ways), and a Medium sized Pteranodon as well.

    Kobold Airborne Cavalry Corps go!

    MechMantis on
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    MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    Pathfinder was designed by the old WotC CharOp boards spontaneously becoming sentient, so that checks out

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    SleepSleep Registered User regular
    Ah my bad I thought we were talking 5e d&d cause their animal companions and pet classes leave a lot to be desired.

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    DepressperadoDepressperado I just wanted to see you laughing in the pizza rainRegistered User regular
    well that's a thing that's going in my campaign now :+1:

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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    I was, to be quite honest, just spitballing about an idea that popped into my head one day.

    Honestly feel free to ignore any/all of my posts about character builds because they're pretty much guaranteed to be super zany in one way or another.

    like Pavise Crossbowman Utility Belt Batman/Green Arrow, who has an array of special bolts for EVERY situation.

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    GlalGlal AiredaleRegistered User regular
    My Starfinder rat medic has a three legged dog she rides that can fire lasers from its mouth.

    It took 3 feats, 5 points in a worthless skill, half of my equipment worth in credits and it's not particularly effective, but she gets to ride a dog that fires lasers from its mouth into battle.

    It is I, that person in your campaign that tries to adopt everything, ask me anything.

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