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An Incomplete [History] of History Threads

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    alberta is conventionally understood to be the racist uncle of canada

    but like, same problem as painting the south with broad strokes

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    ChicoBlueChicoBlue Registered User regular
    Alberta's only the racist uncle because Quebec would be a racist oncle.

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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    ChicoBlue wrote: »
    Alberta's only the racist uncle because Quebec would be a racist oncle.

    hon hon hon

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    ChicoBlue wrote: »
    Alberta's only the racist uncle because Quebec would be a racist oncle.

    tabernac!

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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Today in "geofencing be weird", I learned of a book called Road to Disunion, a look at the seeds of the American Civil War planted from 1776 onwards, sounded like that was my jam, and looked for it on Audible. Volume Two is available, but not Volume One. I do not grok this.

    Anyone read that book? Worth my time?

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    Today in "geofencing be weird", I learned of a book called Road to Disunion, a look at the seeds of the American Civil War planted from 1776 onwards, sounded like that was my jam, and looked for it on Audible. Volume Two is available, but not Volume One. I do not grok this.

    Anyone read that book? Worth my time?

    When it comes to books in a series, physical bookstores are legally, indeed morally obligated to stock an incomplete set with as much sequence-breaking as possible to keep people from being able to start, much less finish, the damn things. Ten in the series? Sorry, we only have books 2, 5 and 8!

    It was only a matter of time before digital bookstores were brought back into that fold...

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    CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    Today in "geofencing be weird", I learned of a book called Road to Disunion, a look at the seeds of the American Civil War planted from 1776 onwards, sounded like that was my jam, and looked for it on Audible. Volume Two is available, but not Volume One. I do not grok this.

    Anyone read that book? Worth my time?

    When it comes to books in a series, physical bookstores are legally, indeed morally obligated to stock an incomplete set with as much sequence-breaking as possible to keep people from being able to start, much less finish, the damn things. Ten in the series? Sorry, we only have books 2, 5 and 8!

    It was only a matter of time before digital bookstores were brought back into that fold...

    I can't count the amount of times my mom would home a book she thought I'd like and it ended up being book 2 in a series of 5

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    ud1vj9vhddap.png

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    PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited July 2021
    https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210706-the-secret-lives-of-neanderthal-children
    By Rebecca Wragg Sykes

    As savage storms and then powerful spring tides earlier in the year had lashed Spain's south-west coast, huge waves scoured away the sand at the base of 20m (65ft) dunes, revealing an enormous area of rock covering some 6,000 sq m (1.5 acres). Its surface was pocked with indentations which the pair of biologists recognised as footprints: a jumble of hooves, claws and paws preserved in the rock. But when the two women looked closer, among the criss-crossing animal tracks were other prints that looked startlingly human. What's more, their position at the bottom of the cliff layers meant they had to have been left in the distant past.

    Later dating showed the footprint surface formed around 80-120,000 years ago, meaning they can only have been left by Neanderthals, walking barefoot along the margins of a salty marsh or lagoon. What they were doing, and where they were going, we can only guess at, but among the 87 prints found were some much smaller than the others. This was a group, and some of them were children.


    Felt kinda emotional reading this article for some reason

    Peas on
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    JuggernutJuggernut Registered User regular
    Every time I watch this delightful, wholesome man I have to remind myself living in the 18th century would have undoubtedly sucked hot, be-scrurvied ass.

    That said look how happy he is making old timey cheese.

    https://youtu.be/4B6qYQbvJWY

    It's amazing to me this is free on YouTube. The quality is excellent, he's legitimately informative and extremely passionate about history and giving people a way to visualize everyday life in the America's circa 250ish years ago. Just a real nice, happy, earnest man in a funny hat telling you about salting fish or how you can hollow out a log to make a canoe.

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    PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited July 2021
    Hermes - The Immortal Guide (History & Mythology Documentary) 2:14:10
    https://youtu.be/vYMhcEFrzrU
    A full exploration of the god Hermes in the history and mythology of Greece. The meaning of the god's name, his genealogy, and his most important myths are examined in detail. His ultimate origins and connection to other European gods like Odin, Gaulish Mercury, Pushan and even Mithra are likewise explored.

    Peas on
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    PeasPeas Registered User regular
    The Patron Saint of the Internet 11:44
    https://youtu.be/T7QjSGHgu3Q

    St. Isidore of Seville has the marvellous (albeit unofficial) title of 'Patron Saint of the Internet' - acting as God's heavenly advocate of the digital world. However, this may all change depending on whether the recently beatufied Carlo Acutis gets canonised. If so, the teenager may become the official Patron Saint of the Internet.

    In this video, we'll explore the unusual lives and afterlives of Saint Isidore and Carlo Acutis, but also take a look at some other wacky and obscure patron saints. Like St. Drogo, patron saint of ugly people and coffee.

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    I'm reading Eric Cline's 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed and came across this bit when he was introducing the Hittites:
    Together [the ruins of Hattusa] allow us to piece together not only the history of the Hittite rulers and their interactions with other peoples and kingdoms, but also that of the ordinary people, including their daily life and society, belief systems, and law codes - one of which contains the rather intriguing ruling "If anyone bites off the nose of a free person, he shall pay 40 shekels of silver."

    ...

    I have Questions about the kind of society that needed to codify that.

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    SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    I need to start that one some time, last history book I read was Say Nothing.

    aTBDrQE.jpg
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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2021
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    I'm reading Eric Cline's 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed and came across this bit when he was introducing the Hittites:
    Together [the ruins of Hattusa] allow us to piece together not only the history of the Hittite rulers and their interactions with other peoples and kingdoms, but also that of the ordinary people, including their daily life and society, belief systems, and law codes - one of which contains the rather intriguing ruling "If anyone bites off the nose of a free person, he shall pay 40 shekels of silver."

    ...

    I have Questions about the kind of society that needed to codify that.

    You know when there's a rule like that it's because Noseless Steve wouldn't stop bringing it up and they finally just had it chiseled onto the goddamn stele so they could adjourn the meeting and knock off for dinner.

    Same as that Biblical prohibition about ladies grabbing your ballsack while you're trying to beat up their boyfriend. "Fine! Fine, Steve, we'll make it super illegal to get your nards twisted in this weirdly specific situation that has never happened to anyone but your dumb ass. I'm sure everyone will just forget about it anyway."

    Jedoc on
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    DepressperadoDepressperado I just wanted to see you laughing in the pizza rainRegistered User regular
    I was helping my friend move today and his younger cousin was with us, and through some twisting path of the conversational forest, we mentioned John Brown and I was like "fuck yeah love that guy".

    His cousin didn't know who John Brown was, so the trips from old house to new and from uhaul to house were basically a lecture about him.

    all my other friends, having been on the receiving end of this particular lesson, were like "oh no you started it."

    we also talked about what a big a piece of shit Morrissey is and how he's betrayed every fan of the Smiths.

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    just looked it up and a shekel(which was a unit of weight, coins didn't come around until much later) was around 10-11 greams

    in modern terms that is a pathetically small sum for biting off somebodies nose, but probably sizable 3200 years ago

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    Skeith wrote: »
    I need to start that one some time, last history book I read was Say Nothing.

    I'm really enjoying it so far; it's one of those eras where I've been meaning to fill in some gaps for awhile and the book's pretty accessible about it.

    Also, Cline loathes Schliemann and it's kind of hilarious taking in his inability not to dunk on the man.

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    just looked it up and a shekel(which was a unit of weight, coins didn't come around until much later) was around 10-11 greams

    in modern terms that is a pathetically small sum for biting off somebodies nose, but probably sizable 3200 years ago

    At the time, to the guys being hit with that fine, it would have been several years' wages for an unskilled labourer.

    Probably a good incentive to get one's protein elsewhere, for sure.

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    MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    Skeith wrote: »
    I need to start that one some time, last history book I read was Say Nothing.

    I'm really enjoying it so far; it's one of those eras where I've been meaning to fill in some gaps for awhile and the book's pretty accessible about it.

    Also, Cline loathes Schliemann and it's kind of hilarious taking in his inability not to dunk on the man.

    Pretty common among archaeologists, though with Cline in particular - Schliemann did literally blow up with dynamite the late Bronze Age layer that was from the time that inspired the tale of the Trojan War, utterly annihilating forever all the actual evidence of the Troy of the Iliad.

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    This book is also reminding me of the fact that wow, Tutankhamun really had chronic everything of the everything. Poor guy wasn't a case of the mummy's curse as much as the eventual mummy being himself cursed.

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    MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    He shouldn't have forsaken Aten.

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    He shouldn't have forsaken Aten.

    or been outrageously inbred with a bloodline full of chronic illnesses!

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    PeasPeas Registered User regular
    I wonder how many generations it took before people start noticing that inbreeding is pretty bad
    Also was it a inherently instinctive for people to avoid it since early folks seems to be well aware of the consequences to set things up so they can minimize the odds

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    edited July 2021
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    He shouldn't have forsaken Aten.

    or been outrageously inbred with a bloodline full of chronic illnesses!

    Or taken up recreational woodchipper diving as a hobby, judging from the state of his previous and perimortem injuries...
    Peas wrote: »
    I wonder how many generations it took before people start noticing that inbreeding is pretty bad

    I figure there are reasons most of the Egyptian dynasties stopped producing viable heirs or otherwise fell apart as quickly as they did. Once a given dynasty took the throne they tended to run out of genesgas in 2-4 generations, after which someone was named as successor because there were no functional sons on hand.

    Tutankhamun's dynasty was a pretty long-lasting one at about 260 years, but near its end it was producing people like, well, him.

    Zibblsnrt on
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    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Peas wrote: »
    Hermes - The Immortal Guide (History & Mythology Documentary) 2:14:10
    https://youtu.be/vYMhcEFrzrU
    A full exploration of the god Hermes in the history and mythology of Greece. The meaning of the god's name, his genealogy, and his most important myths are examined in detail. His ultimate origins and connection to other European gods like Odin, Gaulish Mercury, Pushan and even Mithra are likewise explored.

    See, these days my main impression of Hermes comes from madline Miller's fantastic Circe, and so i'm just like "Hermes, what an arse".

    I'm trying to find sources for this, but i've also heard it said that in the transmutation of myths that happened as they moved between cultures, Odyessus ended up becoming Loki. Seems fitting!

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    He shouldn't have forsaken Aten.

    or been outrageously inbred with a bloodline full of chronic illnesses!

    Or taken up recreational woodchipper diving as a hobby, judging from the state of his previous and perimortem injuries...
    Peas wrote: »
    I wonder how many generations it took before people start noticing that inbreeding is pretty bad

    I figure there are reasons most of the Egyptian dynasties stopped producing viable heirs or otherwise fell apart as quickly as they did. Once a given dynasty took the throne they tended to run out of genesgas in 2-4 generations, after which someone was named as successor because there were no functional sons on hand.

    Tutankhamun's dynasty was a pretty long-lasting one at about 260 years, but near its end it was producing people like, well, him.

    8e3qz24w2gbq.png

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    GundiGundi Serious Bismuth Registered User regular
    please don't post my picture without my permission

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    Gundi wrote: »
    please don't post my picture without my permission

    sorry about your 1(one) atrophied coal-like ball and head full of water

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    TheStigTheStig Registered User regular
    Head full of water is how I stay hydrated.

    bnet: TheStig#1787 Steam: TheStig
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    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    The worst bit is that's a painting, so it's probably well, flattering to the subject.

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    “Why is his family tree upside down?!” still kills me

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    ProhassProhass Registered User regular
    edited July 2021
    It wasn’t so much that people didn’t always know inbreeding was bad, it’s just it was the best way to keep all your money in the family and accrue power and titles amongst certain society structures. Like, hmmm our kids may die at 17 but think about the savings, let’s roll the dice

    Prohass on
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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    "He baffled all of Christendom by continuing to live." May be one of my favourite historical quotes.

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    HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    1280px-New-Wing-Vatican-Museums-25497052238-cropped.jpg
    Nilus, the river god of Egypt's Nile, with cornucopia, wheatsheaf, sphinx, and crocodile. Sculpture from Rome's Temple of Isis and Serapis.

    "This is entirely too many babies"

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    OdinOdin Registered User regular
    TheStig wrote: »
    Head full of water is how I stay hydrated.

    The water tastes really bad, like ass and dirt. I don't suggest anyone drink it

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    ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    Hobnail wrote: »
    "This is entirely too many babies"

    Now, is Nilus saying that, or the crocodile they're currently savaging?

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    HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    For a marble statue Nilus has a bit of a dad bod goin and I appreciate that he's fuckin run ragged with all these little bastards

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    SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Looks pretty beefy though

    Strong boi

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