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US Rental Eviction Moratorium Ends: SE Mutual Aid Action Station

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    MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Oghulk wrote: »
    College athletics has enough weird/under the table funding mechanisms it's really not reasonable to bring it up as a part of the cost of tuition.

    That just makes the high costs even more damning if a colossal expense doesn't actually have an impact on the tuition

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    pookapooka Registered User regular
    Docshifty wrote: »
    As someone who hasn't been to college

    How much does a bachelor's degree cost?
    I have one semester of online classes that cost $9,448

    So. A lot.
    And a huge component of it is not just that initial price - the interest sucks
    Yeah, I am a couple hundred from being done, and I don't want to think about how much more I paid because --for years-- I was too poor to pay above the minimum, or anything at all.

    I got an English bachelor's from Oklahoma State, I knew I wasn't going to be rich. But I had no business getting money handed to me like that; I got government loans, not especially predatory, and I still ended up barely treading water.
    This is gut feeling and probably unfair to a small portion of well-managed institutions, but I'm gonna assert that this is true for most American public universities: because they increasingly operate as profit-driven corporations, school administration at the C-level is overpaid, and bloated, and massive amounts of money go to sport rather than academic programs. (Corruption, racism, and exploitation is a whole 'nother layer I'm not addressing.)

    So there's a demand for stupid amounts of money in an official capacity. (And it's typically more expensive to live or eat on campus, which are often a requirement for freshmen.)

    Because this is obviously an unreasonable amount of money, students are expected to get loans to offset tuition... so the loans are also for stupid amounts of money, because going to school generally also means independent living, ie a place to live, food, class materials, utilities... ...So then many landlords charge ridiculous rent, because they can, people need shelter, but these kids aren't actually paying for it, the loans are. And the kids literally don't have the brain structures to grok the consequences of debt, so their only hope of mitigation is an upbringing that has prepared them emotionally or financially -- they've learned frugality, or have a safety net. At this point, I'm not sure if credit cards or student loans are worse.

    Education doesn't have to be expensive, but capitalists decided anything not currently generating money is a loss in profit, and additionally devalue knowledge for itself.

    If the loan system were explicitly designed to teach financial literacy and management rather than maximize profit above all, the return on 'investment' (ie, better informed and productive citizens) would be a net positive for society. But that would be socialism.
    I was lucky because I actually had one really great person rent to me for a couple years (in nice, older homes at super cheap), but I also lived in mouseholes. I had a grant and a couple scholarships at one point. I wasn't especially extravagant, ate mostly at home, worked at restaurants to get some meals, shopped at thrift stores and the cheap grocery store, dumpster dived and swapped with friends, I just didn't don't know shit about financial planning, and didn't want to burden my parents with further debt. So I was in and out of school because I couldn't pay off tuition, working multiple part-time jobs, and still needed help for rent more often than not.

    I got to finish my degree because my grandfather paid the $1000 I owed the bursar (in gratitude for me dropping everything to do elder care, after a nudge from my sister.) Which meant I got the privilege of paying for another semester out of pocket, but at least I had a degree to show, finally. But I still had the loans, despite paying whenever I thought I could spare 50 bucks. Because once interest kicked in, I was lucky to be covering that, much less touch the principal.

    My partner doesn't come from Circumstances and utilized his privileges and hard work to get paid, and he has largely funded paying down my loan debt. With undiagnosed ADHD, depression, and anxiety, I have struggled to stay alive, much less employed. I burned out trying to do both, and am belatedly getting healthy enough to try again.

    Education should be free, but until then, loan forgiveness and similar measures are the minimum to get people in a better status quo.

    lfchwLd.jpg
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    MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Nirya wrote: »
    Madican wrote: »
    I just went and looked it up for 2021

    1. Charles Kelly, UCLA Coach: $5,730,000 in 2021, up from $4,313,333 in 2020
    2. Justin Wilcox, UC Berkeley Coach: $3,957,917 in 2021, up from $3,113,334 in 2020
    3. Michael Cronin, UCLA Coach: $3,851,667 in 2021, up from $3,606,667 in 2020
    4. Jason Roostaeian, UCLA Coach: $3,389,882 in 2021, up from $1,837,056 in 2020
    5. James Mora, UCLA Coach: $3,104,975 in 2021, up from $3,000,000 in 2020.

    By comparison, here's the top state worker positions excluding coaches.

    1. CEO of California State Teachers Retirement System: $1,661,151
    2. Phys Spec Anesthesiology, LA County: $1,375,000
    3. Physician Manager, San Joaquin County: $1,194,629
    4. Physician Manager, San Joaquin County: $1,189,341
    5. Physician, San Joaquin County: $1,142,048

    Nirya is your school still paying for fired Jim Mora????

    Yeah, cause his buyout was insane so it's spread out.

    That said UCLA does not take money from tuition to fund the AD (aka there is no student-services fee that supports athletics like at many schools). It was a big deal a few years ago when the school gave the AD a loan to cover for COVID losses.

    Edit: #4 on the California list is a doctor, not a coach just fyi.

    Blame Sacramento Bee, was using their table of public employees since they updated it today.

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    StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    But wait, there’s more!
    • Income-Based Repayment has been adjusted to 225% of the poverty line, so you don’t even have to make a monthly payment until your annual gross earnings hit roughly $30K (Single).
    • Halved the discretionary income max from 10% to 5%, meaning lower monthly minimum payments.
    • Stopped student loan balances from growing via interest. So long as you are making payments, you will pay down your debt. This includes those paying $0 due to insufficient income, so being poor doesn’t punish you with a growing balance.
    • Increasing the Pell Grant to reflect tuition increases over the past decades.

    YL9WnCY.png
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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Madican wrote: »
    Oghulk wrote: »
    College athletics has enough weird/under the table funding mechanisms it's really not reasonable to bring it up as a part of the cost of tuition.

    That just makes the high costs even more damning if a colossal expense doesn't actually have an impact on the tuition

    Don't worry, it'll really start to go up soon as higher ed consolidation begins due to lower enrollment numbers/demographic changes.

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    milskimilski Poyo! Registered User regular
    I am sorry to people in this/the other thread but I may have to walk back "freezes your interest" because the wording is ambiguous and it might simply be that paying the minimum also gets you covered up to your interest, which is way better with lower minimums plus better income based repayment but also means you can easily end up in a weird hole where minimum payments to $Texas all do the same thing to your balance. Need more details.

    I ate an engineer
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    milski wrote: »
    I am sorry to people in this/the other thread but I may have to walk back "freezes your interest" because the wording is ambiguous and it might simply be that paying the minimum also gets you covered up to your interest, which is way better with lower minimums plus better income based repayment but also means you can easily end up in a weird hole where minimum payments to $Texas all do the same thing to your balance. Need more details.

    Yeah, I think I saw it clarified elsewhere that like....if your minimum payment is $40, but the interest payment is $100, then the govt will cover the $60 so your amount owed doesn't go up, but it's also not paying down the principal. But even if you pay 2x minimum, all that will do is make the govt only cover $20 instead of $60, and principal still wouldn't go down.

    Which isn't "no interest," but is still a fuckton better than what there is now.

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    GvzbgulGvzbgul Registered User regular
    So more free money for universities?

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    MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Jragghen wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    I am sorry to people in this/the other thread but I may have to walk back "freezes your interest" because the wording is ambiguous and it might simply be that paying the minimum also gets you covered up to your interest, which is way better with lower minimums plus better income based repayment but also means you can easily end up in a weird hole where minimum payments to $Texas all do the same thing to your balance. Need more details.

    Yeah, I think I saw it clarified elsewhere that like....if your minimum payment is $40, but the interest payment is $100, then the govt will cover the $60 so your amount owed doesn't go up, but it's also not paying down the principal. But even if you pay 2x minimum, all that will do is make the govt only cover $20 instead of $60, and principal still wouldn't go down.

    Which isn't "no interest," but is still a fuckton better than what there is now.

    Sigh. Guess I'm stuck in the leaky barrel a bit longer after all then.

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    NarbusNarbus Registered User regular
    edited August 2022
    Oghulk wrote: »
    Oghulk wrote: »
    College athletics has enough weird/under the table funding mechanisms it's really not reasonable to bring it up as a part of the cost of tuition.

    Helps when the labours free

    Honestly even if players were paid what they're worth we'd probably still see it not requiring subsidies. There's Texa$ in college athletics

    The idea that college athletics pay for themselves is a myth:
    The median athletic department in a Power Five conference has seen earnings balloon to $93.1 million [in 2014] thanks in part to massive new TV contracts, yet 28 of 52 state schools are in the red, including seven in the Pacific-12 and a half-dozen in the ACC, led by Virginia at a whopping negative-$17 million.
    The Washington Post

    The Power Five conferences are the five wealthiest collegiate athletic conferences, and over half of them lost money on athletics. Every division II and III school lost money on their athletics programs. Plus, a lot of those colleges that aren't turning a profit are charging their students "athletics fees" that get funneled into the athletics program, fees that aren't in published tuition levels. From the WaPo article, in 2014 students paid $114 million in these kinds of fees.

    College athletics are a scam.

    Narbus on
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    18gCzqs.png

    Okay, so this is legit just some undercover person working for Fox News to make Biden look cool, right?

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    KwoaruKwoaru Confident Smirk Flawless Golden PecsRegistered User regular
    Is he wearing a cape there?

    2x39jD4.jpg
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    GvzbgulGvzbgul Registered User regular
    Presumably it's a photo from him doing a thing at a university graduation.

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    NiryaNirya Registered User regular
    This ain't the thread for it, but athletic departments are the kings of funky accounting in order to show deficits, especially at the D1 level. It's how they've tried to justify not paying players for years, even as administration costs, coaching salaries, support staffs, and new buildings have exploded across the college landscape. Like, to consider UCLA, the school I cover, for a second, they're operating with a massive debt at the moment, but a lot of that is because they had been running at "even" budgets instead of stockpiling profits for rainy days, using funds to pay for improvements around campus (see: the new football and basketball practice facilities). This is the same all throughout the sport, especially at the P5 level.

    At the DII and DIII level, the money is different, mostly because of football (which costs a ton but they refuse to give up on) and lack of high-dollar media contracts. But athletes at that level are closer to the myth of "student-athlete" than the ones at the DI level, which are straight-up professional athletes without pay.

    t70pctuqq2uv.png
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    CoinageCoinage Heaviside LayerRegistered User regular
    It really feels like interest rates aren't a big enough part of the conversation. People talk a lot about the costs but even today in a lot of places, in state undergrad isn't the worst thing ever. But I just had to look up that Federal student loan interest rate is currently 5%. That's pants shitting.

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    KwoaruKwoaru Confident Smirk Flawless Golden PecsRegistered User regular
    Hmmm I bet I actually get nothing from this because I refinanced my federal and private into one loan

    Maybe mohela will let me take a mulligan on that

    2x39jD4.jpg
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    McHogerMcHoger Registered User regular
    Kwoaru wrote: »
    Hmmm I bet I actually get nothing from this because I refinanced my federal and private into one loan

    Maybe mohela will let me take a mulligan on that

    I'm in the same boat. I don't want to have sour grapes over the people this is helping, but it was definitely a mistake to look at my loan payoff date today.

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    KwoaruKwoaru Confident Smirk Flawless Golden PecsRegistered User regular
    McHoger wrote: »
    Kwoaru wrote: »
    Hmmm I bet I actually get nothing from this because I refinanced my federal and private into one loan

    Maybe mohela will let me take a mulligan on that

    I'm in the same boat. I don't want to have sour grapes over the people this is helping, but it was definitely a mistake to look at my loan payoff date today.

    I guess I should have bet on old man biden kicking the can down the road last December

    2x39jD4.jpg
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    GnizmoGnizmo Registered User regular
    Sterica wrote: »
    But wait, there’s more!
    • Income-Based Repayment has been adjusted to 225% of the poverty line, so you don’t even have to make a monthly payment until your annual gross earnings hit roughly $30K (Single).
    • Halved the discretionary income max from 10% to 5%, meaning lower monthly minimum payments.
    • Stopped student loan balances from growing via interest. So long as you are making payments, you will pay down your debt. This includes those paying $0 due to insufficient income, so being poor doesn’t punish you with a growing balance.
    • Increasing the Pell Grant to reflect tuition increases over the past decades.

    So my minor quibble is that you might not be paying down the debt depending on how much the interest is. It won't be growing, but it won't be shrinking either. I am honestly only upset by this because I thought it was the other way and got too excited. Still huge wins all around.

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    I needed anime to post.I needed anime to post. boom Registered User regular
    pooka wrote: »
    Docshifty wrote: »
    As someone who hasn't been to college

    How much does a bachelor's degree cost?
    I have one semester of online classes that cost $9,448

    So. A lot.
    And a huge component of it is not just that initial price - the interest sucks
    Yeah, I am a couple hundred from being done, and I don't want to think about how much more I paid because --for years-- I was too poor to pay above the minimum, or anything at all.

    I got an English bachelor's from Oklahoma State, I knew I wasn't going to be rich. But I had no business getting money handed to me like that; I got government loans, not especially predatory, and I still ended up barely treading water.
    This is gut feeling and probably unfair to a small portion of well-managed institutions, but I'm gonna assert that this is true for most American public universities: because they increasingly operate as profit-driven corporations, school administration at the C-level is overpaid, and bloated, and massive amounts of money go to sport rather than academic programs. (Corruption, racism, and exploitation is a whole 'nother layer I'm not addressing.)

    So there's a demand for stupid amounts of money in an official capacity. (And it's typically more expensive to live or eat on campus, which are often a requirement for freshmen.)

    Because this is obviously an unreasonable amount of money, students are expected to get loans to offset tuition... so the loans are also for stupid amounts of money, because going to school generally also means independent living, ie a place to live, food, class materials, utilities... ...So then many landlords charge ridiculous rent, because they can, people need shelter, but these kids aren't actually paying for it, the loans are. And the kids literally don't have the brain structures to grok the consequences of debt, so their only hope of mitigation is an upbringing that has prepared them emotionally or financially -- they've learned frugality, or have a safety net. At this point, I'm not sure if credit cards or student loans are worse.

    Education doesn't have to be expensive, but capitalists decided anything not currently generating money is a loss in profit, and additionally devalue knowledge for itself.

    If the loan system were explicitly designed to teach financial literacy and management rather than maximize profit above all, the return on 'investment' (ie, better informed and productive citizens) would be a net positive for society. But that would be socialism.
    I was lucky because I actually had one really great person rent to me for a couple years (in nice, older homes at super cheap), but I also lived in mouseholes. I had a grant and a couple scholarships at one point. I wasn't especially extravagant, ate mostly at home, worked at restaurants to get some meals, shopped at thrift stores and the cheap grocery store, dumpster dived and swapped with friends, I just didn't don't know shit about financial planning, and didn't want to burden my parents with further debt. So I was in and out of school because I couldn't pay off tuition, working multiple part-time jobs, and still needed help for rent more often than not.

    I got to finish my degree because my grandfather paid the $1000 I owed the bursar (in gratitude for me dropping everything to do elder care, after a nudge from my sister.) Which meant I got the privilege of paying for another semester out of pocket, but at least I had a degree to show, finally. But I still had the loans, despite paying whenever I thought I could spare 50 bucks. Because once interest kicked in, I was lucky to be covering that, much less touch the principal.

    My partner doesn't come from Circumstances and utilized his privileges and hard work to get paid, and he has largely funded paying down my loan debt. With undiagnosed ADHD, depression, and anxiety, I have struggled to stay alive, much less employed. I burned out trying to do both, and am belatedly getting healthy enough to try again.

    Education should be free, but until then, loan forgiveness and similar measures are the minimum to get people in a better status quo.

    Yeah like all of the structures around going to college/uni, every adult in a young person's life, looks them in the eye, smiles, and says "These loans will be easy to pay!" Some of them even believe it! It's an entire industry built upon lying to and exploiting people that society has said "Yeah they're old enough to trick now."

    liEt3nH.png
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    ElaroElaro Apologetic Registered User regular
    Jragghen wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    I am sorry to people in this/the other thread but I may have to walk back "freezes your interest" because the wording is ambiguous and it might simply be that paying the minimum also gets you covered up to your interest, which is way better with lower minimums plus better income based repayment but also means you can easily end up in a weird hole where minimum payments to $Texas all do the same thing to your balance. Need more details.

    Yeah, I think I saw it clarified elsewhere that like....if your minimum payment is $40, but the interest payment is $100, then the govt will cover the $60 so your amount owed doesn't go up, but it's also not paying down the principal. But even if you pay 2x minimum, all that will do is make the govt only cover $20 instead of $60, and principal still wouldn't go down.

    Which isn't "no interest," but is still a fuckton better than what there is now.

    Wait wait wait, this is just the government paying your student debt interest to the Student Loan Provider instead of you? And changing student loan rules so student pay a more reasonable amount (ie less)?

    Pooro, I think I know how the Republicans will spin this... ("It's not the government's job to pay new grads' debt that we manipulated them into taking out and forced the universities into requiring!")

    It's almost like Biden is setting this policy up to make it easy for the GOP to justify taking it away...

    Children's rights are human rights.
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    Everything I read was secondhand, people going "wait, wait" so take with some salt?

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    MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Waiting as I've been waiting. If they've got the paperwork ready though then release it in full and then do the dumb press release if that's what they're waiting for

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    MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Elaro wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    I am sorry to people in this/the other thread but I may have to walk back "freezes your interest" because the wording is ambiguous and it might simply be that paying the minimum also gets you covered up to your interest, which is way better with lower minimums plus better income based repayment but also means you can easily end up in a weird hole where minimum payments to $Texas all do the same thing to your balance. Need more details.

    Yeah, I think I saw it clarified elsewhere that like....if your minimum payment is $40, but the interest payment is $100, then the govt will cover the $60 so your amount owed doesn't go up, but it's also not paying down the principal. But even if you pay 2x minimum, all that will do is make the govt only cover $20 instead of $60, and principal still wouldn't go down.

    Which isn't "no interest," but is still a fuckton better than what there is now.

    Wait wait wait, this is just the government paying your student debt interest to the Student Loan Provider instead of you? And changing student loan rules so student pay a more reasonable amount (ie less)?

    Pooro, I think I know how the Republicans will spin this... ("It's not the government's job to pay new grads' debt that we manipulated them into taking out and forced the universities into requiring!")

    It's almost like Biden is setting this policy up to make it easy for the GOP to justify taking it away...

    Even before that bit they've been railing against forgiveness because they've internalized that debt is real money and by forgiving it it doesn't just disappear it was paid by their taxes. And that's the crux they've solidified around in addition to "you knew what you were signing up for" and "so what about me who actually paid my loan back when candy was a penny farthing"

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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    yeah, it's not "the debt is going away" it's "I'm paying for their debt in my taxes" (when, if I'm not mistaken, student debt is considered part of the national debt, so this is actually making some of the national debt go poof?)

    Anyway, re: the bit I quoted originally, I think that stems from the "if you make your minimum payment, you won't get any interest added to principal", but that doesn't mean "interest is zero." You're still paying interest first. So in order to reduce your principal, you need to cover up the interest in a given month.

    So what this should realistically do is just make it so people do minimum payments (read: 5%) for 10 or 25 years, then loans go poof, or if you're concerned that things might change (gee, I wonder why), then instead of trying to put a little extra every month, save up for 3-4 months until you've got enough to cover the entire interest payment for a single month, pay in one huge chunk to overwhelm the interest and chip away at the principal, then next month the amount which would be paid interest goes down, lather rinse and repeat and theoretically over time the amount of time you need to save in order to make the large payment will go down. But the interest that you don't pay doesn't get added to the principal you owe, resulting in what so many people ended up having: larger loans than when they started.

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    Sweeney TomSweeney Tom Registered User regular
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!

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    GvzbgulGvzbgul Registered User regular
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!
    But that would kill the free money tree.

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    NarbusNarbus Registered User regular
    edited August 2022
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!

    Not really, since that leaves every single person heading to their freshman year of college right now in a really shitty position. Any big, all encompassing fix to education is going to require a lot of legislation at the federal and state level. This reform was something that only needed Biden to sign off on

    Narbus on
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    Sweeney TomSweeney Tom Registered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!
    But that would kill the free money tree.

    Joe Biden is a pathetic coward who has only ever cared about himself, which isn't surprising/continues a lifelong tradition of his https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/dec/02/joe-biden-student-loan-debt-2005-act-2020

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    Narbus wrote: »
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!

    Not really, since that leaves every single person heading to their freshman year of college right now in a really shitty position. Any big, all encompassing fix to education is going to require a lot of legislation at the federal and state level. This reform was something that only needed Biden to sign off on

    The number of people going to a new year of college is drastically lower than the number of people who are in ridiculous amounts of student loan debt in the US

    I don't think that small number of people is an excuse, they could just add them to the list of people who are getting that loan forgiveness by setting to include loans up to a certain date this year, and otherwise make policy that subsidizes future education/cuts interest drastically on government-based student loans

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    NarbusNarbus Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Narbus wrote: »
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!

    Not really, since that leaves every single person heading to their freshman year of college right now in a really shitty position. Any big, all encompassing fix to education is going to require a lot of legislation at the federal and state level. This reform was something that only needed Biden to sign off on

    The number of people going to a new year of college is drastically lower than the number of people who are in ridiculous amounts of student loan debt in the US

    I don't think that small number of people is an excuse, they could just add them to the list of people who are getting that loan forgiveness by setting to include loans up to a certain date this year, and otherwise make policy that subsidizes future education/cuts interest drastically on government-based student loans

    Yeah, but interest rates and education spending levels are both set by Congress. Getting Congress to pass education reform is much more complicated than this reform, which is a purely executive action.

    I'm all for big action on fixing how education is funded, but there isn't anything about that kind of fix that's 'simple', and this reform is going to really help a lot of people.

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    Beef AvengerBeef Avenger Registered User regular
    Elaro wrote: »
    can you imagine that the university of california system used to be free tuition to state residents a mere 55 years ago, it boggles my mind

    As with many government programs turning to shit in America, blame Ronald Reagan.

    He became Governor of California in 1966 and "fought hard in the legislature to impose tuition at four-year colleges" and gutted state funding for the public higher education system.

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    LanzLanz ...Za?Registered User regular
    This is one step forward, but more of the debt needs to be forgiven and we need to demand that public colleges and universities be funded as public education: Free to the Public as a vital, foundational civic cornerstone

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    cabsycabsy the fattest rainbow unicorn Registered User regular
    Kwoaru wrote: »
    Hmmm I bet I actually get nothing from this because I refinanced my federal and private into one loan

    Maybe mohela will let me take a mulligan on that

    don't quote me on this but *theoretically* if you consolidated with a federal loan provider, they should still be eligible? consolidated loans are still eligible for programs like PSLF as long as you consolidated them properly (a whole other nightmare to navigate) so this should also be the case, I think?

    oh shit I didn't see the "federal and private" RIP to you, probably :| private loans are a fucking disgrace

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    The Cow KingThe Cow King a island Registered User regular
    edited August 2022
    Lanz wrote: »
    This is one step forward, but more of the debt needs to be forgiven and we need to demand that public colleges and universities be funded as public education: Free to the Public as a vital, foundational civic cornerstone

    It's extremely funny that all the climate orgs are asking for a fundamental economic and political change and the best the USA can do is still some hoe make sure these loans are a profitable return to the state through insane repayments (and at least one unnessecary middle man's) and not taxes

    Absolutely wild

    The Cow King on
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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Nirya wrote: »
    This ain't the thread for it, but athletic departments are the kings of funky accounting in order to show deficits, especially at the D1 level. It's how they've tried to justify not paying players for years, even as administration costs, coaching salaries, support staffs, and new buildings have exploded across the college landscape. Like, to consider UCLA, the school I cover, for a second, they're operating with a massive debt at the moment, but a lot of that is because they had been running at "even" budgets instead of stockpiling profits for rainy days, using funds to pay for improvements around campus (see: the new football and basketball practice facilities). This is the same all throughout the sport, especially at the P5 level.

    At the DII and DIII level, the money is different, mostly because of football (which costs a ton but they refuse to give up on) and lack of high-dollar media contracts. But athletes at that level are closer to the myth of "student-athlete" than the ones at the DI level, which are straight-up professional athletes without pay.

    D2 and D3 are probably closest to actual amateur athletics specifically because of the lack of TV coverage and the fact that they aren't getting literally billions from media rights. D1 though? Gangbusters shit.

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    MagellMagell Detroit Machine Guns Fort MyersRegistered User regular
    No! My remaining loan is a private one. I paid the wrong one off when I quit my old job and had my 401k cashed out.

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    PoorochondriacPoorochondriac Ah, man Ah, jeezRegistered User regular
    Magell wrote: »
    No! My remaining loan is a private one. I paid the wrong one off when I quit my old job and had my 401k cashed out.

    Look, it's like my lawyer told me to never say: you're never too old to commit fraud

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    JokermanJokerman Everything EverywhereRegistered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    Sure seems like just cancelling it all would have been simpler!!!
    But that would kill the free money tree.

    Joe Biden is a pathetic coward who has only ever cared about himself, which isn't surprising/continues a lifelong tradition of his https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/dec/02/joe-biden-student-loan-debt-2005-act-2020

    He still gets full marks from me for freeing me from a spiral of debt bondage. Until student loans went into forbearance with the pandemic, I had worked two jobs just trying to make any kind of dent in the principle i could. Shit sucked.

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