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[PC Build Thread] Someday we'll all be able to buy GPU's again

13468938

Posts

  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    edited August 25
    user wrote: »
    I dunno, you could argue AIO Liquid Coolers have a set life-time and afterwards you have to replace them. Whereas with a custom loop with some best practices you can reuse every part for a looong time.

    Yeah, but how many AIOs are you going to have to buy to break even on a custom loop? There is no universe where they equal out on anything like a reasonable time frame. And there's a good chance you'll need to regularly refresh the custom loop with new water blocks as you replace components, aside from the maintenance hassle.

    Orca on
    Infidel
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Outright replacing an AIO is cheaper and easier than maintaining a custom loop. Speaking as a custom loop owner on an eight-year run computer.

    OrokosPA.png
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx It's not a "weapon art", it's an ANIMATION Registered User regular
    user wrote: »
    I dunno, you could argue AIO Liquid Coolers have a set life-time and afterwards you have to replace them. Whereas with a custom loop with some best practices you can reuse every part for a looong time.

    The maintenance can take a long time (disassembling), plus leak monitoring, part deterioration (tubes, washers, fittings, pumps, res, etc).

    God help you if you've got mismatched metals in that loop.

    It's a lot more maintenance, more than I think most people want to undertake.

  • useruser Registered User regular
    Well then, I'd argue that a stacked fin air cooler is certainly a life long purchase. Nothing to really degrade or replace other than the fans but any kind of liquid cooling has that issue too.

  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    I dread have to do loop teardowns because it's pretty much an entire weekend. I'm due for one in 2-3 months and I'm not looking forward to it. However, it will finally give me the chance to swap in a different CPU block and a pcie-4 riser cable both of which I've had since April. Also debating switching to red fluid from blue just to change things up.

    I've said it before custom open loops are almost entirely for aesthetics now. A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    I've gone and bought a M1 Mac Mini and 4-Bay Synology NAS to use when I don't need to power of my 5900x/3080 system which is 75% of the time I'm using a PC. Even at idle and the AC going my PC will heat up the room a couple of degrees. It's not an issue during the winter but during the summer it's a major one.

    I really enjoy the build process and looks of an open loop PC, but I also understand that it comes with some serious caveats and expenses. I am able to reuse the majority of the parts in future builds as a new one really only requires a new GPU block which run from $150-250. The initial investment though in everything else can easily reach $1000 though. There are some different fittings I'd like to use, Phanteks or EKWB's Torque, but the outlay of multiple hundreds of dollars to do so is hard to justify.

    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
  • OgotaiOgotai Registered User regular
    Cormac wrote: »
    A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    Not picking on you but I’ve seen this a few times the last couple of weeks and its bugging the engineer part of my brain. But my lack of knowledge of electronics may be failing me. So maybe someone knows more & can fill in the blanks. Does electrical resistance scale dramatically with the temperature of the chips or is it somewhat constant?

    If it’s constant & your cpu is consuming Y amount of power and putting out X btu/hr no matter what at full load for example. Then it should act like a like a normal heat transfer problem. That X amount of heat is going into the room no matter what. A good cooler can just do it at a lower temperature differential, say 20C vs 40C, because it’s more efficient and needs a lower energy differential to move X amount of heat. Just it may seem more noticeable with a crap cooler as it’s putting out less hotter air (plus maybe some noticeable radiant heat from the much higher temp components), while a good one may output more cooler air.

    For similar reasoning is why you need heat pipes on larger air coolers, above a certain size hanging bigger/longer fins off the cpu won’t do anything & you need the cpu temp to increase to push out more heat.

    Or is there something unique to electronics I’m missing

  • jungleroomxjungleroomx It's not a "weapon art", it's an ANIMATION Registered User regular
    edited August 25
    Ogotai wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    Not picking on you but I’ve seen this a few times the last couple of weeks and its bugging the engineer part of my brain. But my lack of knowledge of electronics may be failing me. So maybe someone knows more & can fill in the blanks. Does electrical resistance scale dramatically with the temperature of the chips or is it somewhat constant?

    If it’s constant & your cpu is consuming Y amount of power and putting out X btu/hr no matter what at full load for example. Then it should act like a like a normal heat transfer problem. That X amount of heat is going into the room no matter what. A good cooler can just do it at a lower temperature differential, say 20C vs 40C, because it’s more efficient and needs a lower energy differential to move X amount of heat. Just it may seem more noticeable with a crap cooler as it’s putting out less hotter air (plus maybe some noticeable radiant heat from the much higher temp components), while a good one may output more cooler air.

    For similar reasoning is why you need heat pipes on larger air coolers, above a certain size hanging bigger/longer fins off the cpu won’t do anything & you need the cpu temp to increase to push out more heat.

    Or is there something unique to electronics I’m missing

    By definition an open loop air cooler will keep your room hotter because it's removing more heat from the system.

    At some point metal air block coolers, AIOs, and custom loops ALL reach saturation points and will have to dump the waste heat into your room. If your closed loop cooler is consistently keeping your system 20C cooler, then that extra thermal energy will eventually be disappated out through the radiatior once the liquid inside the cooler hits equilibrium and there's no more thermal mass to absorb.

    I will say I disagree with air coolers matching custom loop coolers in temps unless we're talking about lower voltage components. Open loop coolers have obscene amounts of thermal mass.

    jungleroomx on
    Thawmus
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    The better the cooling, the more heat you will dump into the room, it doesn't really matter which solution it is but just how well it cools.

    You're going to generate the same heat output from a CPU for the same workload. You either (a) move that heat effectively as any other or (b) don't move heat as well, which leads to thermal throttling, which leads to less heat output total.

    So no matter what, if you have the same amount of workload/throttling, all thermal solutions are dealing with the same heat and they're all putting it into the room.

    OrokosPA.png
    ThawmusOrcaSoggybiscuitwunderbar
  • zagdrobzagdrob Registered User regular
    Ogotai wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    Not picking on you but I’ve seen this a few times the last couple of weeks and its bugging the engineer part of my brain. But my lack of knowledge of electronics may be failing me. So maybe someone knows more & can fill in the blanks. Does electrical resistance scale dramatically with the temperature of the chips or is it somewhat constant?

    If it’s constant & your cpu is consuming Y amount of power and putting out X btu/hr no matter what at full load for example. Then it should act like a like a normal heat transfer problem. That X amount of heat is going into the room no matter what. A good cooler can just do it at a lower temperature differential, say 20C vs 40C, because it’s more efficient and needs a lower energy differential to move X amount of heat. Just it may seem more noticeable with a crap cooler as it’s putting out less hotter air (plus maybe some noticeable radiant heat from the much higher temp components), while a good one may output more cooler air.

    For similar reasoning is why you need heat pipes on larger air coolers, above a certain size hanging bigger/longer fins off the cpu won’t do anything & you need the cpu temp to increase to push out more heat.

    Or is there something unique to electronics I’m missing

    Most modern chips throttle back significantly if they start to reach their thermal limits, so having better cooling lets them run at significantly higher wattage (overclocking or not). I think my 3070 has 220W TDP and my 3950X has 150W, but if they start getting around 75-80* they'll start to drop performance until they get back around 100W and 80W respectively.

  • jungleroomxjungleroomx It's not a "weapon art", it's an ANIMATION Registered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    The better the cooling, the more heat you will dump into the room, it doesn't really matter which solution it is but just how well it cools.

    You're going to generate the same heat output from a CPU for the same workload. You either (a) move that heat effectively as any other or (b) don't move heat as well, which leads to thermal throttling, which leads to less heat output total.

    So no matter what, if you have the same amount of workload/throttling, all thermal solutions are dealing with the same heat and they're all putting it into the room.

    That depends on if you're keeping your CPU at 40c, 60c, or 80c.

  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    The better the cooling, the more heat you will dump into the room, it doesn't really matter which solution it is but just how well it cools.

    You're going to generate the same heat output from a CPU for the same workload. You either (a) move that heat effectively as any other or (b) don't move heat as well, which leads to thermal throttling, which leads to less heat output total.

    So no matter what, if you have the same amount of workload/throttling, all thermal solutions are dealing with the same heat and they're all putting it into the room.

    That depends on if you're keeping your CPU at 40c, 60c, or 80c.

    Yes that's what I said. Thermal throttling is the only factor that your cooling controls.

    Heatsink/AIO/custom loops have different characteristics in how they respond to loads but once at equilibrium they all dump the same heat for the same CPU output. The distribution over time looks a bit different but it's the same energy. Like an extreme example is cooking an egg on your CPU for high soak (and then poor chance at effective equilibrium...).

    These are all heat-mover solutions, you only get into more meaningful distinctions with different solutions like extreme cooling with coolants or other non-passive sources.

    OrokosPA.png
    OrcaSoggybiscuitjungleroomx
  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    The better the cooling, the more heat you will dump into the room, it doesn't really matter which solution it is but just how well it cools.

    You're going to generate the same heat output from a CPU for the same workload. You either (a) move that heat effectively as any other or (b) don't move heat as well, which leads to thermal throttling, which leads to less heat output total.

    So no matter what, if you have the same amount of workload/throttling, all thermal solutions are dealing with the same heat and they're all putting it into the room.

    That depends on if you're keeping your CPU at 40c, 60c, or 80c.

    The CPU is generating some amount of heat by pulling X watts of power from the wall. Watts in as electricity ~= watts out as heat. The only way any cooling system reduces heat is if the CPU is able to throttle up and down fast enough that the total kWH used by the system over time is significantly less.

    It's a marginal difference, so from the perspective of overall room heating the difference is negligible.

    One way or another those watts of electricity are being turned into heat. Reduce electricity consumed (more efficient part, downclocking, etc.) and you reduce heat dumped into the room. How your cooling system works only matters for if the CPU is getting thermally throttled, thereby reducing the instantaneous watts being pulled from the wall. Of course, if that results in the workload taking longer to execute, that will even out.

    jungleroomxBahamutZERO
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx It's not a "weapon art", it's an ANIMATION Registered User regular
    Yeah you're all right, it's going to equalize no matter what.

  • -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Large air coolers like the noctua d15 aren't a problem at all and are very effective.

    The noctua u12 according to tests is a really good cooler and will handle a 5800 no problem.

    I had a quick look for reviews and most are from 2013 (I guess this has been around a while?) but one dome recently it kept a 5950X down to 60 degrees.

    So yeah I think I’ll get one of these. Now to decide if I want the beige one or pay $30 more for the nice black one.

  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    -Loki- wrote: »
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Large air coolers like the noctua d15 aren't a problem at all and are very effective.

    The noctua u12 according to tests is a really good cooler and will handle a 5800 no problem.

    I had a quick look for reviews and most are from 2013 (I guess this has been around a while?) but one dome recently it kept a 5950X down to 60 degrees.

    So yeah I think I’ll get one of these. Now to decide if I want the beige one or pay $30 more for the nice black one.

    It's not Noctua if you don't think you dropped a turd in your PC case!

    Thawmus
  • -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    edited August 25
    I see there's some double fan U12S models. Would they be preferable to the single fan?

    -Loki- on
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    I mean... if you want to skimp on RGB, that's your choice, but I'm not sure why anyone would voluntarily gimp their PC's performance like that. :razz:

    I remember sanding beige cases and cutting my own windows in the early aughts so don't get smart with me missy. Blue LEDs were new and we prayed to the IRQ gods to get our sound to work.

    I'm fucking old.

    BetsuniOrcaTrajan45Etheaemp123DrovekV1mBullheadIceBurneran_alt
  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    -Loki- wrote: »
    I see there's some double fan U12S models. Would they be preferable to the single fan?

    I'd want to see some reviews. Push-pull can help if the existing fan does not produce enough static pressure to maintain velocity through the fins. Otherwise it's sufficient and a second fan just adds noise without contributing to cooling.

  • SoundsPlushSoundsPlush yup, back. Registered User regular
    Count me as a sucker who paid extra for Chromax black instead of beige/brown.

    No regrets.

    s7Imn5J.png
    SoggybiscuitjungleroomxInfidelSpoitBetsuni
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    I use an AIO purely for aesthetics and space in the case. That's it. A good air cooler will cool just as well, and likely be quieter. Maybe AIO's will cool a bit better in high ambient temperature areas, but I live in Oregon, so not really an issue for me most of the year.

    I have dreams of someday doing a custom loop, again because of aesthetics, but it's a lot of work and I just haven't committed to it yet.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    Count me as a sucker who paid extra for Chromax black instead of beige/brown.

    No regrets.

    Yeah I'm looking at the beige 90's cooler and the Chromax Black, and I think I can swing $30 to not have that ugly thing in my PC.

  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Count me as a sucker who paid extra for Chromax black instead of beige/brown.

    No regrets.

    I have Chromax blacks (with white corner inserts) that I paid peanuts for, because my buddy bought more than he ended up using!

    Worked well in my black&white build and I got to replace the Fractal stock fans with better flow.

    OrokosPA.png
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    -Loki- wrote: »
    I see there's some double fan U12S models. Would they be preferable to the single fan?

    Honestly just buy the single, then add a fan if you need more cooling. It comes with the mounting thing for the 2nd fan.

  • jungleroomxjungleroomx It's not a "weapon art", it's an ANIMATION Registered User regular
    I'll report back

    ev6ct6i1udvx.png

    QuantumTurk
  • -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    -Loki- wrote: »
    I see there's some double fan U12S models. Would they be preferable to the single fan?

    Honestly just buy the single, then add a fan if you need more cooling. It comes with the mounting thing for the 2nd fan.

    Good to know. It's on my list for the next ionflux of parts for my build.

    In other news, the Red Devil turned up today, and holy shit video cards are big now.

    SmokeStacksRed RaevynBetsuni
  • Trajan45Trajan45 Registered User regular
    Cormac wrote: »
    I dread have to do loop teardowns because it's pretty much an entire weekend. I'm due for one in 2-3 months and I'm not looking forward to it. However, it will finally give me the chance to swap in a different CPU block and a pcie-4 riser cable both of which I've had since April. Also debating switching to red fluid from blue just to change things up.

    I've said it before custom open loops are almost entirely for aesthetics now. A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    I've gone and bought a M1 Mac Mini and 4-Bay Synology NAS to use when I don't need to power of my 5900x/3080 system which is 75% of the time I'm using a PC. Even at idle and the AC going my PC will heat up the room a couple of degrees. It's not an issue during the winter but during the summer it's a major one.

    I really enjoy the build process and looks of an open loop PC, but I also understand that it comes with some serious caveats and expenses. I am able to reuse the majority of the parts in future builds as a new one really only requires a new GPU block which run from $150-250. The initial investment though in everything else can easily reach $1000 though. There are some different fittings I'd like to use, Phanteks or EKWB's Torque, but the outlay of multiple hundreds of dollars to do so is hard to justify.

    How often do you need to tear down a custom loop for cleaning?

    Origin ID\ Steam ID: Warder45
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    I dread have to do loop teardowns because it's pretty much an entire weekend. I'm due for one in 2-3 months and I'm not looking forward to it. However, it will finally give me the chance to swap in a different CPU block and a pcie-4 riser cable both of which I've had since April. Also debating switching to red fluid from blue just to change things up.

    I've said it before custom open loops are almost entirely for aesthetics now. A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    I've gone and bought a M1 Mac Mini and 4-Bay Synology NAS to use when I don't need to power of my 5900x/3080 system which is 75% of the time I'm using a PC. Even at idle and the AC going my PC will heat up the room a couple of degrees. It's not an issue during the winter but during the summer it's a major one.

    I really enjoy the build process and looks of an open loop PC, but I also understand that it comes with some serious caveats and expenses. I am able to reuse the majority of the parts in future builds as a new one really only requires a new GPU block which run from $150-250. The initial investment though in everything else can easily reach $1000 though. There are some different fittings I'd like to use, Phanteks or EKWB's Torque, but the outlay of multiple hundreds of dollars to do so is hard to justify.

    How often do you need to tear down a custom loop for cleaning?

    A flush each year should help avoid early component failure. Ideally you design your loop so that draining-flushing-filling won't require taking much apart.

    How many years you'll get out of components seems to vary quite a bit with the quality you go with. And of course making sure you're not accelerating failure by having wrong metal mixes or contaminants.

    OrokosPA.png
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx It's not a "weapon art", it's an ANIMATION Registered User regular
    So far Win 11 has been turning on Auto HDR and moving the taskbar to the left side and just forgetting it's even installed.

    Auto HDR is nice for older titles.

  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    I dread have to do loop teardowns because it's pretty much an entire weekend. I'm due for one in 2-3 months and I'm not looking forward to it. However, it will finally give me the chance to swap in a different CPU block and a pcie-4 riser cable both of which I've had since April. Also debating switching to red fluid from blue just to change things up.

    I've said it before custom open loops are almost entirely for aesthetics now. A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    I've gone and bought a M1 Mac Mini and 4-Bay Synology NAS to use when I don't need to power of my 5900x/3080 system which is 75% of the time I'm using a PC. Even at idle and the AC going my PC will heat up the room a couple of degrees. It's not an issue during the winter but during the summer it's a major one.

    I really enjoy the build process and looks of an open loop PC, but I also understand that it comes with some serious caveats and expenses. I am able to reuse the majority of the parts in future builds as a new one really only requires a new GPU block which run from $150-250. The initial investment though in everything else can easily reach $1000 though. There are some different fittings I'd like to use, Phanteks or EKWB's Torque, but the outlay of multiple hundreds of dollars to do so is hard to justify.

    How often do you need to tear down a custom loop for cleaning?

    A flush each year should help avoid early component failure. Ideally you design your loop so that draining-flushing-filling won't require taking much apart.

    How many years you'll get out of components seems to vary quite a bit with the quality you go with. And of course making sure you're not accelerating failure by having wrong metal mixes or contaminants.

    Yup, once a year. I only run clear fluid with dye and have gone much longer than one year without any problems. Mayhems fluids and clear tubing is good stuff. I don't really care for the look or potential issues that can come with solid fluids.

    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
  • SyngyneSyngyne Registered User regular
    Orca wrote: »
    -Loki- wrote: »
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Large air coolers like the noctua d15 aren't a problem at all and are very effective.

    The noctua u12 according to tests is a really good cooler and will handle a 5800 no problem.

    I had a quick look for reviews and most are from 2013 (I guess this has been around a while?) but one dome recently it kept a 5950X down to 60 degrees.

    So yeah I think I’ll get one of these. Now to decide if I want the beige one or pay $30 more for the nice black one.

    It's not Noctua if you don't think you dropped a turd in your PC case!

    Counterpoint
    rjhljpj82gks.jpg

    5gsowHm.png
    jungleroomxInfidelOrcaBetsuni
  • useruser Registered User regular
    Cormac wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    I dread have to do loop teardowns because it's pretty much an entire weekend. I'm due for one in 2-3 months and I'm not looking forward to it. However, it will finally give me the chance to swap in a different CPU block and a pcie-4 riser cable both of which I've had since April. Also debating switching to red fluid from blue just to change things up.

    I've said it before custom open loops are almost entirely for aesthetics now. A high end air cooler or AIO will pretty much match an open loop for temperatures and not dump obscene amount of heat into the room.

    I've gone and bought a M1 Mac Mini and 4-Bay Synology NAS to use when I don't need to power of my 5900x/3080 system which is 75% of the time I'm using a PC. Even at idle and the AC going my PC will heat up the room a couple of degrees. It's not an issue during the winter but during the summer it's a major one.

    I really enjoy the build process and looks of an open loop PC, but I also understand that it comes with some serious caveats and expenses. I am able to reuse the majority of the parts in future builds as a new one really only requires a new GPU block which run from $150-250. The initial investment though in everything else can easily reach $1000 though. There are some different fittings I'd like to use, Phanteks or EKWB's Torque, but the outlay of multiple hundreds of dollars to do so is hard to justify.

    How often do you need to tear down a custom loop for cleaning?

    A flush each year should help avoid early component failure. Ideally you design your loop so that draining-flushing-filling won't require taking much apart.

    How many years you'll get out of components seems to vary quite a bit with the quality you go with. And of course making sure you're not accelerating failure by having wrong metal mixes or contaminants.

    Yup, once a year. I only run clear fluid with dye and have gone much longer than one year without any problems. Mayhems fluids and clear tubing is good stuff. I don't really care for the look or potential issues that can come with solid fluids.

    FWIW I used Mayhems Pastel for 3 years with no maintenance at all, by the time I got around to replacing it -- there were no issues.

  • SpoitSpoit *twitch twitch* Registered User regular
    Syngyne wrote: »
    Orca wrote: »
    -Loki- wrote: »
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Large air coolers like the noctua d15 aren't a problem at all and are very effective.

    The noctua u12 according to tests is a really good cooler and will handle a 5800 no problem.

    I had a quick look for reviews and most are from 2013 (I guess this has been around a while?) but one dome recently it kept a 5950X down to 60 degrees.

    So yeah I think I’ll get one of these. Now to decide if I want the beige one or pay $30 more for the nice black one.

    It's not Noctua if you don't think you dropped a turd in your PC case!

    Counterpoint
    rjhljpj82gks.jpg

    I can't help but wonder if that drive cage is choking out your Noctua. Do you even have intake fans?

    steam_sig.png
    tsmvengy
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    -Loki- wrote: »
    With a 5800X, what cooler would you guys recommend, considering I’m not into overclocking so it’s just going to be running stock.

    Stock for Ryzen CPU's will naturally boost as high, for as long, as their cooling will allow within their silicon limits. The are much more like GPU's than classic CPU's in terms of boosting behavior. It means that there is actually little OC headroom on the CPU's anyway, and that better cooling generally = more better. For the 5800X I'd look at a good tower air cooler or a 240/280+ AIO.

    5800X doesn't come with a cooler

  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks 😉Registered User regular
    I just checked and the invoice for the Corsair H60 closed loop cooler I spent $65 on during a sale is dated 09/09/14 if that gives you any indication of the longevity of AIOs.

    I just recently attached it to the 4th CPU I have owned since buying it.

  • Pixelated PixiePixelated Pixie Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    I mean... if you want to skimp on RGB, that's your choice, but I'm not sure why anyone would voluntarily gimp their PC's performance like that. :razz:

    I remember sanding beige cases and cutting my own windows in the early aughts so don't get smart with me missy. Blue LEDs were new and we prayed to the IRQ gods to get our sound to work.

    I'm fucking old.

    I was programming my own games in BASIC on a TRS-80 in 1984 so don't you missy me, sonny. :razz:

    Now eat your vegetables!

    ~~ Pixie on Steam ~~

    Avatar artwork is "Toys" by Anna Ignatieva
    ironzerg wrote: »
    Chipmunks are like nature's nipple clamps, I guess?
    Pailryderemp123Betsunian_alt
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    I mean... if you want to skimp on RGB, that's your choice, but I'm not sure why anyone would voluntarily gimp their PC's performance like that. :razz:

    I remember sanding beige cases and cutting my own windows in the early aughts so don't get smart with me missy. Blue LEDs were new and we prayed to the IRQ gods to get our sound to work.

    I'm fucking old.

    I was programming my own games in BASIC on a TRS-80 in 1984 so don't you missy me, sonny. :razz:

    Now eat your vegetables!

    I feel like we should compare harumphs at this point.

    jungleroomxOrcaBetsunian_alt
  • SyngyneSyngyne Registered User regular
    Spoit wrote: »
    Syngyne wrote: »
    Orca wrote: »
    -Loki- wrote: »
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Large air coolers like the noctua d15 aren't a problem at all and are very effective.

    The noctua u12 according to tests is a really good cooler and will handle a 5800 no problem.

    I had a quick look for reviews and most are from 2013 (I guess this has been around a while?) but one dome recently it kept a 5950X down to 60 degrees.

    So yeah I think I’ll get one of these. Now to decide if I want the beige one or pay $30 more for the nice black one.

    It's not Noctua if you don't think you dropped a turd in your PC case!

    Counterpoint
    rjhljpj82gks.jpg

    I can't help but wonder if that drive cage is choking out your Noctua. Do you even have intake fans?

    There are intake fans in the front, yes.

    5gsowHm.png
  • RiusRius Registered User regular
    I just checked and the invoice for the Corsair H60 closed loop cooler I spent $65 on during a sale is dated 09/09/14 if that gives you any indication of the longevity of AIOs.

    I just recently attached it to the 4th CPU I have owned since buying it.

    Shoulda weighed it then and now to check for fluid loss!

    My last AIO lasted 4 years or so; I went to mount it on my new build and noticed crusty green dried coolant all around the CPU block. The rubber gasket shrank just enough over time to allow a teensy bit of seepage. Didn't feel comfortable using it after that.

    I think the biggest giveaway is the typical AIO is only warrantied for 2-3 years. NZXT is the outlier here with a 5 year warranty.

  • IncindiumIncindium Registered User regular
    edited August 26
    Super Nova 750 G5, 80 Plus Gold 750W, Fully Modular

    That should be decent enough PSU to replace the explodey Gigabyte 850w? Newegg emailed me and I'm waiting to find out what my replacement options from them are but thinking I'll just buy the EVGA PSU to swap out then just return the Gigabyte for refund from Newegg.

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  • ThawmusThawmus Registered User regular
    edited August 26
    @-Loki- I don't think this has come up yet, but if you're throwing in a big honking Noctua air cooler, definitely make sure it's going to fit inside your case. They have a compatibility list on their website. The D15, in particular, is huge. Also whether you use a 2nd fan or not may depend on what the physical clearance of your RAM is.

    I went with RGB RAM, knowing it was going to make things tight and that the 2nd fan may block the RGB bling, and sure enough, it did. So I skipped the 2nd fan, and yet my half-strength D15 does the job.

    You can also always just get a smaller fan and attach it instead but then it's not gonna have the Noctua silence. Or you can just move the 2nd fan "up" a bit, depending on how much room is in your case.

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