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    expendableexpendable Silly Goose Registered User regular
    3cl1ps3 wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    This is also why little dogs tend to get such a bad rap as far as I can tell - People get them because 'cute' and then don't train the fuckers because they're small and what training do they really need?

    So you end too with a tiny creature regularly scared out of it's wits (in part because it's tiny) responding the only way it can - yapping and biting.

    Big dogs tend to be more chill because there's less that bothers them, they get more training... And depressingly, the ones that don't probably don't survive long because they're actively dangerous instead of ignorable.

    This is also a big part of why pitbulls get a bad rap. They're no more liable to bite than any other dog breed, but they do a lot more damage when they do because stronk.

    Combined with being the most common breed farmed for fighting and then abandoned, so you get a lot of poorly socialized pitties out there. It's a shame because when they aren't traumatized, pitties are just big dumb idiots who love everyone and want pets.

    Statistically by far the most bites each year are reported from poms and chihuahuas.

    A friend of mine has a pitty that is just the most adorable softy in the history of the world. He sits on my lap like he thinks he's a cat. No concept at all of his size because he'll curl up into a ball right there for a good long snoozle. Almost scared of his own shadow too, there's a fair bit of hiding behind a trusted human and peering from behind them at new things or maybe-scary things. Favorite things are belly rubs and ear scritches. He also does this thing where he has decided he would like to bark at something, and he' let out half a muffled woof then look at them for permission to continue barking and let out a real doozy if he gets it.

    I've never had a dog but the girlfriend is working on getting a new one, so I'm gonna have a dog in a few weeks maybe. As long as it doesn't eat my cats I'm happy.

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    edited January 2022
    The pros and cons are effectively:

    Purebreds:
    - purebreds have more reliable temperament/personality styles
    - purebreds can be fucking expensive and went up like 1/3 the price in the last year and a half due to covid puppies being a thing
    - registered purebreds are required by the AKC and CKC to have veterinary workups of both parents and lineage, so you can have more confidence your puppy will have limited health issues (or at least, limited unpredictable ones, some breeds are more likely to develop certain issues than others)
    - you guarantee being able to work with the puppy from a young age, can plan for socialization, and make it much easier to train them to not have any major issues
    - one potential option if you have your heart set on a specific breed is to look for breed-specific shelters, too!

    With mixed breed/shelter dogs:
    - ethically a good thing to adopt from there and not from a backyard breeder especially
    - often shelter dogs are particularly affectionate and attached and people-pleasers because they fucking loooooove you for giving them a real home
    - some breed mixes are beneficial e.g chugs are goofy as shit but they tend to lack the shakiness of chihuahuas and the facial issues of pugs
    - while some shelters will guess at breeds, 90 percent of the time it is a total guess and they have no fucking idea
    - you have to be careful about the shelter and review their policies - a good shelter will vet adopters substantially, and have a little parole period where the dog can be reclaimed or returned if they are not a good fit - bad shelters may not truly vet the dog for cats/kids/aggression issues, and you risk (especially with dogs past 12-20 weeks) issues of anxiety or aggression you may be unprepared for
    - the worst example of the above I've heard of was an acquaintance adopting a puppy who had parvo, the shelter denied being the source despite the whole litter having parvo, and the poor thing passed despite the acquaintance's vet's best efforts
    - you need to be prepared to call in a trainer if there are potential issues of basic obedience, anxiety, or aggression

    Basically for a new owner I'd suggest a young puppy or a much older chill dog. It can be hard, especially for a dog that has floated through multiple homes, for new owners to read their body language and understand what issues there are and how to fix them - it can be overwhelming. Probably 2/3 of our one-on-one lessons are multi-home dogs, and most of those folks are first-time owners with good intentions; try to get a pup that's just gone through the one if possible, or it tends to compound issues of anxiety and aggression.

    If you do go purebred, please be sure you're not getting one from a backyard breeder - the type you find on Craigslist or Kijiji just selling underpriced dogs with no certification. They're pretty much the worst people you can buy them from in terms of ethics and the health of the breeding pair.

    In terms of shelters, check reviews, monitor their social media for a while, ask about them in local dog groups. Be careful about the ones that ship dogs in from elsewhere as it can be harder to return the dog if they're a bad fit for your household. I know some folks who have really succeeded with those shelters, but others have had significant difficulties with working with the dog they brought in, so it can kinda be luck of the draw. Local shelters may let you come in and meet the dog, too, which can help with figuring out early if you've got a good vibe.

    Cello on
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    see317see317 Registered User regular
    I have been asked to volunteer for a fund raising event at a local pet rescue.
    I have been assured that part of this task will involve playing with puppies and dogs available for adoption.

    The question is, how much of a token fight do I put up before accepting an excuse to spend a few hours playing with piles of adorable?

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    ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    see317 wrote: »
    I have been asked to volunteer for a fund raising event at a local pet rescue.
    I have been assured that part of this task will involve playing with puppies and dogs available for adoption.

    The question is, how much of a token fight do I put up before accepting an excuse to spend a few hours playing with bringing home one of these piles of adorable?

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
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    see317see317 Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    I have been asked to volunteer for a fund raising event at a local pet rescue.
    I have been assured that part of this task will involve playing with puppies and dogs available for adoption.

    The question is, how much of a token fight do I put up before accepting an excuse to spend a few hours playing with bringing home one of these piles of adorable?

    It is going to be a titanic battle of will to not become a dog owner by the end of this ordeal.
    But I will remember that I don't have a yard. And not having a yard, but owning a dog, means starting and ending every day for the next decade with a plastic glove full of warm dog waste.
    I must stay strong.

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    jkylefultonjkylefulton Squid...or Kid? NNID - majpellRegistered User regular
    Unsolicited advice - get pet insurance. When Ruff was having his medical issues, we spent a ton of time at Michigan State University's animal clinic. I watched family after family make the "how can we afford this treatment" calculation in the waiting room. Pet insurance helps you avoid that situation.

    tOkYVT2.jpg
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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    expendable wrote: »
    3cl1ps3 wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    This is also why little dogs tend to get such a bad rap as far as I can tell - People get them because 'cute' and then don't train the fuckers because they're small and what training do they really need?

    So you end too with a tiny creature regularly scared out of it's wits (in part because it's tiny) responding the only way it can - yapping and biting.

    Big dogs tend to be more chill because there's less that bothers them, they get more training... And depressingly, the ones that don't probably don't survive long because they're actively dangerous instead of ignorable.

    This is also a big part of why pitbulls get a bad rap. They're no more liable to bite than any other dog breed, but they do a lot more damage when they do because stronk.

    Combined with being the most common breed farmed for fighting and then abandoned, so you get a lot of poorly socialized pitties out there. It's a shame because when they aren't traumatized, pitties are just big dumb idiots who love everyone and want pets.

    Statistically by far the most bites each year are reported from poms and chihuahuas.

    A friend of mine has a pitty that is just the most adorable softy in the history of the world. He sits on my lap like he thinks he's a cat. No concept at all of his size because he'll curl up into a ball right there for a good long snoozle. Almost scared of his own shadow too, there's a fair bit of hiding behind a trusted human and peering from behind them at new things or maybe-scary things. Favorite things are belly rubs and ear scritches. He also does this thing where he has decided he would like to bark at something, and he' let out half a muffled woof then look at them for permission to continue barking and let out a real doozy if he gets it.

    I've never had a dog but the girlfriend is working on getting a new one, so I'm gonna have a dog in a few weeks maybe. As long as it doesn't eat my cats I'm happy.

    The thing with staffies, and I assume other kinds of pit bull, is specifically because they were bred to be so strong and dangerous, any slightest attitude of aggression towards humans was bred out of them. People who had them for fighting didn't want the risk of them attacking them or their family. So barring trauma from abuse they are basically genetically destined to be super soft, lovable pets and they fucking adore children.

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    Man, I hope dog competitions are a thing this year again

    I really wanna take Ivy through at least some basic obedience competition, and scent detection is pretty cool as a potential trial to do by the end of summer, maybe

    Missing out on a lot of prime title time thanks to the pandemic

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    Hey Cello is it possible to get two dogs that don't like eachother to...like eachother? My german shepherd mix is a bit dramatic with corrections, and my parents' dog seems to interpret it as aggression and just immediately goes into fight mode. We tried to reintroduce them again on leashes out in neutral territory and they just hackled up and barked at eachother.

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Hey Cello is it possible to get two dogs that don't like eachother to...like eachother? My german shepherd mix is a bit dramatic with corrections, and my parents' dog seems to interpret it as aggression and just immediately goes into fight mode. We tried to reintroduce them again on leashes out in neutral territory and they just hackled up and barked at eachother.

    Mmmm, some dogs just... don't like each other, it's like how some people don't like each other

    Sometimes it's body language being off (and German Shepherds being naturally clumsy overcommitted goobers with no concept of personal space can be an issue there, I have noticed as a GSD owner/having introduced Ivy to several who inevitably try to lick her entire face...), sometimes it's that they don't have energy that meshes up, some dogs fucking hate puppies because their body language/communication/vibe is wrong, etc

    You can try reintroducing them in neutral territory more times and seeing if they can be socialized to each other better, could also check if this is behaviour your parents' dog has with other dogs (in which case it could maybe be trained out, if it is a repeated defense mechanism), maybe try playing with them individually near each other if they both like playing ball and whatnot (but in a manner where you have control in case things go south e.g. a longline), and could try walking them together in neutral places, but I can't guarantee any of that will work because some dogs just don't get along, y'know

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    @cello I need to hire you to come to Australia and stop our doofus male berner from being the dog equivalent of verucca salt
    “I. Want. It. Now”
    “well you’re not getting it now.”
    Dog bafflement intensifies

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Hey Cello is it possible to get two dogs that don't like eachother to...like eachother? My german shepherd mix is a bit dramatic with corrections, and my parents' dog seems to interpret it as aggression and just immediately goes into fight mode. We tried to reintroduce them again on leashes out in neutral territory and they just hackled up and barked at eachother.

    Mmmm, some dogs just... don't like each other, it's like how some people don't like each other

    Sometimes it's body language being off (and German Shepherds being naturally clumsy overcommitted goobers with no concept of personal space can be an issue there, I have noticed as a GSD owner/having introduced Ivy to several who inevitably try to lick her entire face...), sometimes it's that they don't have energy that meshes up, some dogs fucking hate puppies because their body language/communication/vibe is wrong, etc

    You can try reintroducing them in neutral territory more times and seeing if they can be socialized to each other better, could also check if this is behaviour your parents' dog has with other dogs (in which case it could maybe be trained out, if it is a repeated defense mechanism), maybe try playing with them individually near each other if they both like playing ball and whatnot (but in a manner where you have control in case things go south e.g. a longline), and could try walking them together in neutral places, but I can't guarantee any of that will work because some dogs just don't get along, y'know

    I think I knew this deep down and was just hoping I was wrong. We have no idea how my parents' dog interacted with other dogs before they adopted her, but she gets along with my parents' other dog just fine. The issue is she likely has had no other exposure to dogs before and just has no concept of boundaries. But when my parents adopted her, she was extremely underweight and sick, so she wasn't really getting into shit or energetic because of all that. In hindsight, that would have been a better time to introduce them, but that ship has sailed.

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    @cello I need to hire you to come to Australia and stop our doofus male berner from being the dog equivalent of verucca salt
    “I. Want. It. Now”
    “well you’re not getting it now.”
    Dog bafflement intensifies

    I promise I would do my best to teach your pup how he's gotta at least do a nice sit first, but there's limits to what I can teach a dog about boundaries. Especially if it's a space/time scenario

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    edited January 2022
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Hey Cello is it possible to get two dogs that don't like eachother to...like eachother? My german shepherd mix is a bit dramatic with corrections, and my parents' dog seems to interpret it as aggression and just immediately goes into fight mode. We tried to reintroduce them again on leashes out in neutral territory and they just hackled up and barked at eachother.

    Mmmm, some dogs just... don't like each other, it's like how some people don't like each other

    Sometimes it's body language being off (and German Shepherds being naturally clumsy overcommitted goobers with no concept of personal space can be an issue there, I have noticed as a GSD owner/having introduced Ivy to several who inevitably try to lick her entire face...), sometimes it's that they don't have energy that meshes up, some dogs fucking hate puppies because their body language/communication/vibe is wrong, etc

    You can try reintroducing them in neutral territory more times and seeing if they can be socialized to each other better, could also check if this is behaviour your parents' dog has with other dogs (in which case it could maybe be trained out, if it is a repeated defense mechanism), maybe try playing with them individually near each other if they both like playing ball and whatnot (but in a manner where you have control in case things go south e.g. a longline), and could try walking them together in neutral places, but I can't guarantee any of that will work because some dogs just don't get along, y'know

    I think I knew this deep down and was just hoping I was wrong. We have no idea how my parents' dog interacted with other dogs before they adopted her, but she gets along with my parents' other dog just fine. The issue is she likely has had no other exposure to dogs before and just has no concept of boundaries. But when my parents adopted her, she was extremely underweight and sick, so she wasn't really getting into shit or energetic because of all that. In hindsight, that would have been a better time to introduce them, but that ship has sailed.

    Ah, so, is the dog acting like this with other dogs too? They probably consider the one at home to be part of the "pack" but dogs outside of their family are potentially threatening. The potential lack of socialization could definitely be a factor, as well as age. Is it just an anxiety reaction or is there aggression there?

    It's hard to assess without knowing the full situation. If it's anxiety, they might need to expose her to more dogs in a safe but neutral environment and give praise/treats when she sees them, e.g. sitting away from a path and giving her treats when they walk by, or even finding a basic obedience class where they can get exposure as long as there are no issues of dominance/aggression

    For example, we managed to reform one particularly amazing chihuahua who had such gigantic balls he couldn't fully sit down. The uh, issues he had were less amusing though - he spent his first six months in a room alone without ever leaving, and was *wildly* anxious. We effectively did exposure therapy through several months of exercises and group classes, and he eventually got to the point where he was extremely nonchalant about being around classes of dogs and people (and his owner helped us with other anxious dogs as a volunteer, super nice guy)

    But some dogs, especially if they're older, might not get to the point where they're going to have much interest in other dogs, and it might just be something that introduces anxiety, or entices them to get defensive; it might be easier to have a local trainer make an assessment if this is something your parents want to work on since there's only so much I can say based on a couple of posts without meeting the dog

    Cello on
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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    She gets along fine with Clifford, my other dog, but that's mostly because Clifford is extremely chill. She gets all up in his business and sniffs his dick like it's her job, and he just ignores her. Holly is not so pleased with another dog's face under her business and does as you'd imagine.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Cello wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    @cello I need to hire you to come to Australia and stop our doofus male berner from being the dog equivalent of verucca salt
    “I. Want. It. Now”
    “well you’re not getting it now.”
    Dog bafflement intensifies

    I promise I would do my best to teach your pup how he's gotta at least do a nice sit first, but there's limits to what I can teach a dog about boundaries. Especially if it's a space/time scenario

    Oh it’s more about being a bossy bitch
    if I’m nicer to the doofus than he deserves, it’s probably a manifestation of typical Berner anxiety. Some of them are afraid of everything; his half sister ziggy has co-dependence issues; his anxiety is about routine. “We go on walks at These Times to These Places, where I do These Things, and if something doesn’t go according to my internal doggy plan, then I will boss you until it happens.” Where bossing might be slamming a meaty paw onto your thigh, or becoming an immovable obstacle, or staring at you and giving one giant unignorable “BARK” every few minutes until you get the message.

    If you do things the way he’s used to them being done, he’s a very chill dog. But if you deviate too far he goes into Cop mode and tries to bully you until you return to the acceptable range of behavior. He also bullies the other dogs - can’t stray too far from the pack, can’t go into too deep water - and even my brother in laws cat, who according to uschi isn’t allowed to walk on the floor but must remain at eye level or above at all times.

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    SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    May we have pictures of said doofus?

    aTBDrQE.jpg
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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    @cello I need to hire you to come to Australia and stop our doofus male berner from being the dog equivalent of verucca salt
    “I. Want. It. Now”
    “well you’re not getting it now.”
    Dog bafflement intensifies

    I promise I would do my best to teach your pup how he's gotta at least do a nice sit first, but there's limits to what I can teach a dog about boundaries. Especially if it's a space/time scenario

    Oh it’s more about being a bossy bitch
    if I’m nicer to the doofus than he deserves, it’s probably a manifestation of typical Berner anxiety. Some of them are afraid of everything; his half sister ziggy has co-dependence issues; his anxiety is about routine. “We go on walks at These Times to These Places, where I do These Things, and if something doesn’t go according to my internal doggy plan, then I will boss you until it happens.” Where bossing might be slamming a meaty paw onto your thigh, or becoming an immovable obstacle, or staring at you and giving one giant unignorable “BARK” every few minutes until you get the message.

    If you do things the way he’s used to them being done, he’s a very chill dog. But if you deviate too far he goes into Cop mode and tries to bully you until you return to the acceptable range of behavior. He also bullies the other dogs - can’t stray too far from the pack, can’t go into too deep water - and even my brother in laws cat, who according to uschi isn’t allowed to walk on the floor but must remain at eye level or above at all times.

    Oh my God he's a big cute boss baby

    Realistically he probably believes to some degree he is in charge of the other dogs, if not simply the Master Timekeeper, and if it was a real issue of him being too pushy about it with the family you could effectively put him in a timeout long down for 5-20 minutes or so when he gets too out of line and it might curb things, if a simple "no!!!" isn't doing it

    But also Ivy is on a strict schedule as well, which I do find to be exceedingly funny, because she will escalate from simple hints to leaping on top of you and trying to suffocate you with kisses and it's hard to say "look c'mon give me five minutes before we walk, okay"

    (Long downs solve a surprising amount of behavioural issues so long as your dog isn't anxious or highly sensitive; when Ivy snapped at one of the other dogs and we made her lie down for 20 minutes at the other end of the room, she was depressed for two days, so we have to use it very very sparingly)

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Skeith wrote: »
    May we have pictures of said doofus?

    What, this gumball?
    1hjltv80yff2.jpg


    Bonus footage




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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Cello wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    @cello I need to hire you to come to Australia and stop our doofus male berner from being the dog equivalent of verucca salt
    “I. Want. It. Now”
    “well you’re not getting it now.”
    Dog bafflement intensifies

    I promise I would do my best to teach your pup how he's gotta at least do a nice sit first, but there's limits to what I can teach a dog about boundaries. Especially if it's a space/time scenario

    Oh it’s more about being a bossy bitch
    if I’m nicer to the doofus than he deserves, it’s probably a manifestation of typical Berner anxiety. Some of them are afraid of everything; his half sister ziggy has co-dependence issues; his anxiety is about routine. “We go on walks at These Times to These Places, where I do These Things, and if something doesn’t go according to my internal doggy plan, then I will boss you until it happens.” Where bossing might be slamming a meaty paw onto your thigh, or becoming an immovable obstacle, or staring at you and giving one giant unignorable “BARK” every few minutes until you get the message.

    If you do things the way he’s used to them being done, he’s a very chill dog. But if you deviate too far he goes into Cop mode and tries to bully you until you return to the acceptable range of behavior. He also bullies the other dogs - can’t stray too far from the pack, can’t go into too deep water - and even my brother in laws cat, who according to uschi isn’t allowed to walk on the floor but must remain at eye level or above at all times.

    Oh my God he's a big cute boss baby

    Realistically he probably believes to some degree he is in charge of the other dogs, if not simply the Master Timekeeper, and if it was a real issue of him being too pushy about it with the family you could effectively put him in a timeout long down for 5-20 minutes or so when he gets too out of line and it might curb things, if a simple "no!!!" isn't doing it

    But also Ivy is on a strict schedule as well, which I do find to be exceedingly funny, because she will escalate from simple hints to leaping on top of you and trying to suffocate you with kisses and it's hard to say "look c'mon give me five minutes before we walk, okay"

    (Long downs solve a surprising amount of behavioural issues so long as your dog isn't anxious or highly sensitive; when Ivy snapped at one of the other dogs and we made her lie down for 20 minutes at the other end of the room, she was depressed for two days, so we have to use it very very sparingly)

    He definitely thinks he's in charge. Of everyone, in the world. I'll pass the long down method on to the family, maybe we can reign it in a notch.

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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    edited January 2022
    tynic wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    @cello I need to hire you to come to Australia and stop our doofus male berner from being the dog equivalent of verucca salt
    “I. Want. It. Now”
    “well you’re not getting it now.”
    Dog bafflement intensifies

    I promise I would do my best to teach your pup how he's gotta at least do a nice sit first, but there's limits to what I can teach a dog about boundaries. Especially if it's a space/time scenario

    Oh it’s more about being a bossy bitch
    if I’m nicer to the doofus than he deserves, it’s probably a manifestation of typical Berner anxiety. Some of them are afraid of everything; his half sister ziggy has co-dependence issues; his anxiety is about routine. “We go on walks at These Times to These Places, where I do These Things, and if something doesn’t go according to my internal doggy plan, then I will boss you until it happens.” Where bossing might be slamming a meaty paw onto your thigh, or becoming an immovable obstacle, or staring at you and giving one giant unignorable “BARK” every few minutes until you get the message.

    If you do things the way he’s used to them being done, he’s a very chill dog. But if you deviate too far he goes into Cop mode and tries to bully you until you return to the acceptable range of behavior. He also bullies the other dogs - can’t stray too far from the pack, can’t go into too deep water - and even my brother in laws cat, who according to uschi isn’t allowed to walk on the floor but must remain at eye level or above at all times.

    Oh my God he's a big cute boss baby

    Realistically he probably believes to some degree he is in charge of the other dogs, if not simply the Master Timekeeper, and if it was a real issue of him being too pushy about it with the family you could effectively put him in a timeout long down for 5-20 minutes or so when he gets too out of line and it might curb things, if a simple "no!!!" isn't doing it

    But also Ivy is on a strict schedule as well, which I do find to be exceedingly funny, because she will escalate from simple hints to leaping on top of you and trying to suffocate you with kisses and it's hard to say "look c'mon give me five minutes before we walk, okay"

    (Long downs solve a surprising amount of behavioural issues so long as your dog isn't anxious or highly sensitive; when Ivy snapped at one of the other dogs and we made her lie down for 20 minutes at the other end of the room, she was depressed for two days, so we have to use it very very sparingly)

    He definitely thinks he's in charge. Of everyone, in the world. I'll pass the long down method on to the family, maybe we can reign it in a notch.

    If he's really excessive, you don't have to use it as punishment and can just try to do it for a few times a week as an obedience exercise, working up to 30 minutes total (we'll advise every night for aggressive dogs, but for a normal pup just 3-4 times a week to start is fine). It's the fundamental exercise we recommend for about 80 percent of Dog Issues and can take effect rather quickly!

    Initially they might want to leash and sit beside him while watching TV, reading, etc. - he can fall asleep, lie on his side, but isn't allowed to roll away or crawl away. If he moves, you quietly put him back in position - no positive or negative attention, you just put him back in the down and go back to what you were doing (though the first time or two you may have to be more active in putting him back into position, especially if he really thinks highly of himself)

    When the exercise is done, even if he was sleeping, use your release word and make it exciting and clear he was a Good Boy (rewards are acceptable as well)

    Later on they can sit on the couch, be across the room, or even outside the room if the dog is steady, and can phase it out once they see some change in behaviour. They can just bring long downs back into rotation whenever he starts getting a little aspirational for authority again

    You're effectively just teaching them that you're in charge and they need to listen, but also patience and obedience (it's also a technique that is judged at shows, where the owner walks out of the room, but that's probably beyond their goals here)

    Cello on
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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2022
    We send him to lie on his bed when he's being a jerk at home. It's a bit more challenging when we're out in the world, but if we can turn the stay-down-until-i-say-so thing into a regular training exercise regardless of location, that might alleviate things a little.

    Edit: also getting a Berner to not move is definitely playing on easy mode. "You want me to ... be an immobile lump, even when you leave the room? Fucking awesome."

    tynic on
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    CelloCello Registered User regular
    Also, long down competition story
    Before my parents had kids, they spent a year or two travelling the US and Canada competing in dog trials with their German Shepherd (a stray that invited herself into their home one night) and Belgian Tervuren (a purebred from NY), both of whom were pretty darn good at obedience trials

    One particular aspect of some of the higher tier obedience trials, as I recall (I still haven't participated in one), includes having the dog hold a down while you leave the room for a minimum amount of time

    The Belgian was pretty great at it, but German Shepherds tend to really, really fall for one person in particular and hate to have them go out of sight

    So despite nailing most of the other parts of the competition, as soon as my Mom left the room, the GSD tried to just...quietly crawl after her

    Dogs!!!

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    our German shepherd has to be both in front of AND behind us at all times. it's super annoying but he's so lovable you can't stay mad.

    he's also 14 and is losing some of his rationality =(

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    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »

    Mmmm, some dogs just... don't like each other, it's like how some people don't like each other

    Sometimes it's body language being off (and German Shepherds being naturally clumsy overcommitted goobers with no concept of personal space can be an issue there, I have noticed as a GSD owner/having introduced Ivy to several who inevitably try to lick her entire face...), sometimes it's that they don't have energy that meshes up, some dogs fucking hate puppies because their body language/communication/vibe is wrong, etcw

    I walk a Golden Retiver puppy (well, just over a year old now) who's convinced EVERY DOG IS HER FRIEND (also every person. Cats, The birds should make friends with her too. Really, if it exists and is alive, she'd like to play with it/see if it will dispense belly rubs). Which leads to things like Older dogs being "Ye,s yes, you're very nice I'm going the other way now" to her bafflement, because she is made of energy, and older dogs would just like to relax and maybe not play enthusiastically. Possibly the funniest has to be her owner's sister has a 13 year old curly haired dog who's really got limited tolerance for Ruby's enthusiasm. So one time i was helping them both get ready for walks, and this old dog registered that in the current state, I had his leash, but Ruby's leash was held by his mom.

    Excellent, says he! We can go on a walk right now and leave the puppy behind with mum. Commence his attempts to trot off and lead me with him.

    She's a goob, Ruby is, but a lovely one. Slowly getting better at teaching her to not bounce on people and instead just sit in front of them. (also to her owner's delight, i discovered that beef jerky is the BEST bribery for her, and she will do many things if she thinks she'll get jerky out of it)

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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    Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Still got him.

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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Still got him.

    Do you have photographic proof that Max is still, in fact, in your possession?

    Further, do you have additional photographic evidence to prove the assertion that he is 1. cute and 2. a dog?

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    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Still got him.

    Sorry, we've staged a take over this is just a general dogs thread now, no longer your dog thread.

    As part of participating, you'll need to pay a photographic toll to @Mechmantis

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    I have no pets to take pictures of!

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    Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Still got him.

    Sorry, we've staged a take over this is just a general dogs thread now, no longer your dog thread.

    As part of participating, you'll need to pay a photographic toll to @Mechmantis

    Heh…

    Always was. :cool:

    Also I don’t ‘pay’ ‘money’.

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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Well it's not so much asking you to pay money as demanding photos...

    At post-point because THIS IS A ROBBERY GIMMIE THE PICTURES!!!

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    Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    bpijx216znm1.jpeg
    itdv3c78e380.jpeg

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    MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Yessss thank you.

    Max is a precious, wonderful dog

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    see317see317 Registered User regular
    pl399j6fp2wf.jpg

    Guys, I think something is wrong with my dog.

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    Looks fine to me. Is he acting weird?

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    see317see317 Registered User regular
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Looks fine to me. Is he acting weird?

    He doesn't bark at all. Just hisses on occasion.
    Also, I thought dogs would eat fewer bugs.

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    see317 wrote: »
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Looks fine to me. Is he acting weird?

    He doesn't bark at all. Just hisses on occasion.
    Also, I thought dogs would eat fewer bugs.

    NOPE!

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    TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    see317 wrote: »
    pl399j6fp2wf.jpg

    Guys, I think something is wrong with my dog.

    Well first of all, I think your dog may in fact be a dragon.

    steam_sig.png
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    DisruptedCapitalistDisruptedCapitalist I swear! Registered User regular
    edited January 2022
    Xaquin wrote: »
    see317 wrote: »
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    Looks fine to me. Is he acting weird?

    He doesn't bark at all. Just hisses on occasion.
    Also, I thought dogs would eat fewer bugs.

    NOPE!

    DisruptedCapitalist on
    "Simple, real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time." -Mustrum Ridcully in Terry Pratchett's Hogfather p. 142 (HarperPrism 1996)
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    RT800RT800 Registered User regular
    Has your dog pooped on the floor yet?

    'cause he's gonna.

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