As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

House/Homeowner Thread: 6 months late and 50k over budget

1192021222325»

Posts

  • Trajan45Trajan45 Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    The Milwaukee and DeWalt vacs are reviewed well. I have a super small DeWalt vac that works well but the filter hates drywall dust. I want to get a 3-5 gal one but I'm waiting on a sale. I *think* there's a Milwaukee vac that connects to their Packout system, if that matters.

    Yep, a lot of HD reviews mention that. Drywall dust is probably 95% of the reason I'm looking to get one. I don't like using our Dyson handheld on it, since the filters are way more expensive. Since this is a new build house, my tools right now are likely mostly for smaller things. I just picked up a Dremel multi-max for dealing with base boards. Sadly I doubt I'll ever get a miter saw again (which is sad as I used it all the time), just because of space. If I need boards cut, I'll likely need to hire someone or hope HD can do all the cutting.

    I think I may just go with the corded one for that reason. It's cheaper and probably stronger suction wise despite "advertised" rates on the battery one. I'm not sure what other Rigid or Milwakee tools I'll need in the next 5-10 years that I'd use the extra $100 batteries for (no yard).

    Origin ID\ Steam ID: Warder45
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    This time in It Came From Zillow, we have Why I Love My Fucking Home State: Embracing The Bunker Mentality Edition.

    (Of course it's Great Falls, home of the nuke.)

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    ShadowfireThat_GuyMugsleyevilmrhenry
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava ~~She/Her~~ Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Anyone have any thoughts on washer/dryer combo units? I'm trying to plan ahead to when my current set dies (it's almost 8 years old now, Panasonic brand). And I'm wanting to save room. Right now we've got a front loader and dryer stacked and it's a lot of space being used in a small small area.

    I'm changing up my laundry habits anyway to do only 1 load a day (works better for my undiagnosed ADHD brain), soi think it can work.

    I'd likely be looking at Samsung, as I can get a discount from work.

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Anyone have any thoughts on washer/dryer combo units? I'm trying to plan ahead to when my current set dies (it's almost 8 years old now, Panasonic brand). And I'm wanting to save room. Right now we've got a front loader and dryer stacked and it's a lot of space being used in a small small area.

    I'm changing up my laundry habits anyway to do only 1 load a day (works better for my undiagnosed ADHD brain), soi think it can work.

    I'd likely be looking at Samsung, as I can get a discount from work.

    Does all-in-one washer dryer units (were it's 1 machine that washes and dries in a single cycle) are just not very good. You tend to not get especially good washing results and your laundry seldom comes out dry. When my d&d buddies had one years ago and he hated it.

    steam_sig.png
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Generality but holds up: Samsung appliances have fallen off in quality. Too much focus on stuff like wifi connectivity or the "knock to look in your fridge" features. Not enough on "motors and belts not dying" and "not icing up a fridge"

    MegaMan001zepherinSimpsoniaAbsoluteZeroBullheadthatassemblyguy
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    I will just take responsibility that my delicate fingers cannot manage the Stihl string trimmer replacement on its own.

    While we talk string trimmers, does anyone have a favorite brand / style they like of line itself?

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Generality but holds up: Samsung appliances have fallen off in quality. Too much focus on stuff like wifi connectivity or the "knock to look in your fridge" features. Not enough on "motors and belts not dying" and "not icing up a fridge"

    Not a hot take: Samsung appliances have been bad for a long time.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    zepherinSimpsoniaAbsoluteZeroBullheadthatassemblyguyOpty
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    edited May 14
    Has a anyone used hydraulic cement to fill sidewalk holes or foundation cracks?

    The sidewalk to the door from my driveway was at one time, before I owned it, mud jacked (under filled to correct sinkage from the concrete heaving in the winter) the holes have come open over time. It looks like there isn't a big cavity underneath, so I'm thinking of just filling it with some fine grain leveling sand I have and then covering it with the hydraulic cement.

    There is also one foundation block that has some superficial crumbling on the exterior, and am planning to fix that with it too.

    Then potentially use it for some interior mortar cracks in the foundation.

    JebusUD on
    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    I used to really like LG appliances, but those too have been shitting the bed. It’s kind of hard to find well made appliances anymore. Googling reviews is shit because everyone is gaming the reviews, and the products generally don’t shit out for a couple years, so unless something is a scam or truly dog shit it’s hard to get a good recommendation.

  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Speed Queen and bosch are usually considered the best in class but you're paying for it.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Help me Marie Kondo my life and buy my old stuff
    zepherin
  • MazzyxMazzyx Comedy Gold Registered User regular
    Appliances really are a get what you pay for thing. Also a lot of the older style analog stuff last way longer. It's kind of that weird thing where we figured it out simply and they worked and then we made them way to complex and they stop working.

    u7stthr17eud.png
    zepherinMugsley
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Has a anyone used hydraulic cement to fill sidewalk holes or doundation cracks?

    The sidewalk to the door from my driveway was at one time, before I owned it, mud jacked (under filled to correct sinkage from the concrete heaving in the winter) the holes have come open over time. It looks like there isn't a big cavity underneath, so I'm thinking of just filling it with some fine grain leveling sand I have and then covering it with the hydraulic cement.

    There is also one foundation block that has some superficial crumbling on the exterior, and am planning to fix that with it too.

    Then potentially use it for some interior mortar cracks in the foundation.

    Any void under cement is going to keep moving, especially if you're in the north with a freeze/thaw cycle, and any sort of hard but brittle sealant like mortar or hydraulic cement will crack and crumble under seasonal movement. So if you can fill that void with something, the sealant I'd use is Sikaflex Self Leveling sealant or Sikaflex Cement Crack Repair (with foam backer rod if it's wide enough). It's super flexible so will move with the seasons.

    As for a foundation crack, that's a little different. If it's just a hairline exterior crack you want to seal, then Sikaflex again. If it's bigger, then you'll probably want to get a foundation repair company to inject it with epoxy resin.

  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    Protip: Vinyl siding + magic eraser = super easy cleaning. Some parts were almost black with dirt, and regular soap and elbow grease didn't do anything. But it's all melting to whatever this white foam thing is actually made out of. Thankfully it's only one side of the house that needs cleaning, and normally I'd just say screw it, but it's the side that's basically our neighbor's front lawn, and they do use it and I kind of feel guilty that they're the ones who have to look at this crap, so the least I can do is make it look presentable.

    "The sausage of Green Earth explodes with flavor like the cannon of culinary delight."
    PSN: TheWolfman64 3DS/Pokemon Y: 0774-4614-4065/NNID: the_wolfman64
    MichaelLCzepherin
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Has a anyone used hydraulic cement to fill sidewalk holes or doundation cracks?

    The sidewalk to the door from my driveway was at one time, before I owned it, mud jacked (under filled to correct sinkage from the concrete heaving in the winter) the holes have come open over time. It looks like there isn't a big cavity underneath, so I'm thinking of just filling it with some fine grain leveling sand I have and then covering it with the hydraulic cement.

    There is also one foundation block that has some superficial crumbling on the exterior, and am planning to fix that with it too.

    Then potentially use it for some interior mortar cracks in the foundation.

    Any void under cement is going to keep moving, especially if you're in the north with a freeze/thaw cycle, and any sort of hard but brittle sealant like mortar or hydraulic cement will crack and crumble under seasonal movement. So if you can fill that void with something, the sealant I'd use is Sikaflex Self Leveling sealant or Sikaflex Cement Crack Repair (with foam backer rod if it's wide enough). It's super flexible so will move with the seasons.

    As for a foundation crack, that's a little different. If it's just a hairline exterior crack you want to seal, then Sikaflex again. If it's bigger, then you'll probably want to get a foundation repair company to inject it with epoxy resin.

    The exterior foundation block that is to be repaired isn't so much cracked as pitted. Concrete spalling. Fairly mild. Cosmetic I would say, but I worry it'll get worse if I don't fix it.

    the holes in the sidewalk aren't cracks but drilled circles previously sealed with what I would assume was hydraulic cement. I am not filling the entire void with cement, just sand to replace what has come out and then resealing the holes. Heaving should not have any effect on the patch, but the freeze thaw may have caused the old patches to crumble. I'll consider silkaflex, I saw it at the store and it was similarly priced.

    The interior cracks are hairline ones in the mortar.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Appliances really are a get what you pay for thing. Also a lot of the older style analog stuff last way longer. It's kind of that weird thing where we figured it out simply and they worked and then we made them way to complex and they stop working.

    It's not always that simple. Older appliances are vastly less efficient with water and electricity, but I agree they are usually constructed more for repair than replace.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Help me Marie Kondo my life and buy my old stuff
    zepherinShadowfire
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Protip: Vinyl siding + magic eraser = super easy cleaning. Some parts were almost black with dirt, and regular soap and elbow grease didn't do anything. But it's all melting to whatever this white foam thing is actually made out of. Thankfully it's only one side of the house that needs cleaning, and normally I'd just say screw it, but it's the side that's basically our neighbor's front lawn, and they do use it and I kind of feel guilty that they're the ones who have to look at this crap, so the least I can do is make it look presentable.

    It's called Melamine Sponge Foam and you can get them in bulk via Amazon

    jmcdonaldMegaMan001N1tSt4lker
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Appliances really are a get what you pay for thing. Also a lot of the older style analog stuff last way longer. It's kind of that weird thing where we figured it out simply and they worked and then we made them way to complex and they stop working.

    It's not always that simple. Older appliances are vastly less efficient with water and electricity, but I agree they are usually constructed more for repair than replace.

    There are plenty of fancy computer controlled models that are repairable. My LG combo has a pretty decent service manual. Also, there are new innovations that make a lot of traditional repairs not even needed. For example, my washer direct drive. No belts to replace mean there's less to go wrong with the drivetrain. Mine has a special cleaning cycle and an access door to the drain so you can clean out any hair or other crap that would normally get trapped in the bottom. And I'd argue that soldstate electronics that control proper servo motors tend to be more reliable than the old systems of timers, switches and relays simply sending signals to motors with no feedback.

    steam_sig.png
    DoodmannBeyond Normal
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    Hmmm ok.
    Putting in shelves. (and lots of them)
    Was getting brackets up today, came across one where the screw hole just happens to be over a nail plate or maybe some of that diagonal metal bracing (it's an outside corner wall).

    At any rate, can't screw through it, can't move the bracket position without throwing the whole project off.

    Is there a right way to workaround this?
    I was thinking to cut out a sliver of drywall about the size of the bracket (1.5" by 5" or so) exposing the stud and whatever I'm running up against, then making a plug for the hole out of wood, screwing that in above/below the plate, then the bracket gets attached to the plug with short screws.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    Hmmm ok.
    Putting in shelves. (and lots of them)
    Was getting brackets up today, came across one where the screw hole just happens to be over a nail plate or maybe some of that diagonal metal bracing (it's an outside corner wall).

    At any rate, can't screw through it, can't move the bracket position without throwing the whole project off.

    Is there a right way to workaround this?
    I was thinking to cut out a sliver of drywall about the size of the bracket (1.5" by 5" or so) exposing the stud and whatever I'm running up against, then making a plug for the hole out of wood, screwing that in above/below the plate, then the bracket gets attached to the plug with short screws.

    I was going to suggest you make a cleat, which is essentially what you're talking about.

  • OptyOpty Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Appliances really are a get what you pay for thing. Also a lot of the older style analog stuff last way longer. It's kind of that weird thing where we figured it out simply and they worked and then we made them way to complex and they stop working.

    It's not always that simple. Older appliances are vastly less efficient with water and electricity, but I agree they are usually constructed more for repair than replace.

    There are plenty of fancy computer controlled models that are repairable. My LG combo has a pretty decent service manual. Also, there are new innovations that make a lot of traditional repairs not even needed. For example, my washer direct drive. No belts to replace mean there's less to go wrong with the drivetrain. Mine has a special cleaning cycle and an access door to the drain so you can clean out any hair or other crap that would normally get trapped in the bottom. And I'd argue that soldstate electronics that control proper servo motors tend to be more reliable than the old systems of timers, switches and relays simply sending signals to motors with no feedback.

    I know in the past both LG and Samsung were reviled for having a ton of proprietary parts in their appliances so replacing them would be a multi-week affair at best. Dunno if they've addressed that over the last decade or not though.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Speed Queen and bosch are usually considered the best in class but you're paying for it.

    Bosch has two lines of appliances. One is very expensive and excellent. The other is more affordable and basically Samsung.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    FeloniousmozDoodmannzepherin
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Opty wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Mazzyx wrote: »
    Appliances really are a get what you pay for thing. Also a lot of the older style analog stuff last way longer. It's kind of that weird thing where we figured it out simply and they worked and then we made them way to complex and they stop working.

    It's not always that simple. Older appliances are vastly less efficient with water and electricity, but I agree they are usually constructed more for repair than replace.

    There are plenty of fancy computer controlled models that are repairable. My LG combo has a pretty decent service manual. Also, there are new innovations that make a lot of traditional repairs not even needed. For example, my washer direct drive. No belts to replace mean there's less to go wrong with the drivetrain. Mine has a special cleaning cycle and an access door to the drain so you can clean out any hair or other crap that would normally get trapped in the bottom. And I'd argue that soldstate electronics that control proper servo motors tend to be more reliable than the old systems of timers, switches and relays simply sending signals to motors with no feedback.

    I know in the past both LG and Samsung were reviled for having a ton of proprietary parts in their appliances so replacing them would be a multi-week affair at best. Dunno if they've addressed that over the last decade or not though.

    Everything has proprietary parts these days. What counts is the availability of those parts. My understanding is that LG is pretty decent in that respect.

    steam_sig.png
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    edited May 15
    I think Project Farm reads this thread. He just dropped a video on string trimmers.

    That_Guy on
    steam_sig.png
    ElvenshaeAiouazepherinAbsoluteZeroBullhead
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Aioua wrote: »
    Hmmm ok.
    Putting in shelves. (and lots of them)
    Was getting brackets up today, came across one where the screw hole just happens to be over a nail plate or maybe some of that diagonal metal bracing (it's an outside corner wall).

    At any rate, can't screw through it, can't move the bracket position without throwing the whole project off.

    Is there a right way to workaround this?
    I was thinking to cut out a sliver of drywall about the size of the bracket (1.5" by 5" or so) exposing the stud and whatever I'm running up against, then making a plug for the hole out of wood, screwing that in above/below the plate, then the bracket gets attached to the plug with short screws.

    I was going to suggest you make a cleat, which is essentially what you're talking about.

    hey look, it was in fact cross bracing

    good thing i had some half inch OSB laying about

    f53ac2dwarm8.jpg
    uvdj30s32kau.jpg
    w64axm5axym7.jpg

    once i paint it (and cover it with a bracket) you'll never know it's there

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
    ElvenshaejmcdonaldMichaelLCShadowfireMugsleyrndmheroDaenris
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I think Project Farm reads this thread. He just dropped a video on string trimmers.


    Oh... a weed whip/weed whacker.. I don't think I've ever ever heard string trimmer.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited May 15
    We (I) have a rural house and land that my family (I) need to maintain until it can be sold. One task is mowing the couple of acres. BUT! Mower was dead since last fall, suspected battery so finally got new battery this weekend. Full tank of gas so worse case needing to drain, maybe just dump in an additive.

    Installed new battery and air filter because it was there in the store along with the battery. Cleaned out multiple chestnuts out of engine compartment that rodents had stored for the winter.
    Started up! Fired up with a little smoke, but it was running! Did a quick lap to check everything and planned to mow the rest the next day. Started up fine, had some trouble with the long grass, so kept it slow.

    But probably a combination of the thick grass and being old, the belt slipped off and got cut by the blades! Awesome! No more mowing for me after cutting about 1/5 of what I needed to do.

    At least I got my battery core deposit back by turning in the old Pb battery that literally sloshed around when I picked it up. If a Home Depot burns down in southern IL, I have no idea what you're talking about.
    2fea767y7v5l.jpg

    MichaelLC on
    AiouaElvenshaeBeyond NormalGrudgeBullhead
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    On the subject of mowers and batteries, the battery electric riding mowers are pretty nice. I have a Ryobi that has been surprisingly solid. But they run on lead acid batteries, which suck ass. I've only had the thing a year and the battery capacity has already tanked. Currently seeing what it would take to swap out the lead acid batteries for lithium, but I'm guessing it wouldn't play nice with the mower's charger.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    My planter garden is coming along nicely. All the plants seem to be doing well enough. My poblano pepper is struggling a little but it's still growing. My Roma and purple bell pepper have just started flowering. The cucumber started sending out tendrils. I am guiding them to the trellises. I can't wait until I can start harvesting.
    m1ac6m2hbopq.jpg

    My baby lettuce looked about ready for a first harvest last night. I made sure to leave more than an inch of stem so it can grow back. People are saying you can get 3-4 harvests before the plant is spent. I think I seeded a bit too densely this first go around. Too much of my harvest was all stem a little leaf.
    bhr5xjeook2f.jpg

    Armed with this knowledge I seeded my second bed this past weekend. My idea was to sprinkle the seeds directly on the top layer of soil and cover them with landscaping fabric. I'm hoping this method will be as successful while maintaining more even spacing. A lot of the seeds go shifted around when I was watering the first bed so there are more dense clumps and bare patches. I'm hoping this direct sow method keep the spacing more even. To simulate being underground, triggering the seeds to start growing, I covered the planter in landscaping fabric. I'll take it off after a week or 2 when the seedlings have started taking root.

    steam_sig.png
    GrudgeAbsoluteZeroMichaelLCTrajan45Pailryder
  • SyngyneSyngyne Registered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I think Project Farm reads this thread. He just dropped a video on string trimmers.


    Oh... a weed whip/weed whacker.. I don't think I've ever ever heard string trimmer.

    “string trimmer” just makes me think of scissors

    5gsowHm.png
    JebusUD
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited May 18
    I've heard both, just like 'drywall' and 'sheet rock'. Not sure about 'weed whip' though. I say drywall and weed whacker.

    Probably due to Midwest being you know, in the middle.

    MichaelLC on
  • mxmarksmxmarks Registered User regular
    Hey house thread I have an electrical question because I know jack shit about electrical.

    We had some people come clean our house today, and when they left I went into the kitchen and noticed...one of the fucking outlets clearly had been on fire. I wasn't home while they were here, and my wife was on a different floor of the house while they cleaned. No one mentioned it at all and when they left we said thanks and they didn't mention it.

    I don't know anything about this stuff and don't want to get anyone in trouble but like, they did SOMETHING to cause this, right? I'm putting a picture in spoilers because someone smarter than me can look at it and maybe confirm that for me. I don't think outlets just do this.

    Also, is it safe now? We're clearly not using it anymore but I can't kill the breaker because the fridge is on it.
    wdbup5cvpzov.jpg

    I killed the breaker and looked behind the plate and everything back there looks OK- no damage or burn marks or anything. So I'm assuming this is a simple home depot trip to get a new outlet.

    But what the hell, how do you not mention this!?

    PSN: mxmarks - WiiU: mxmarks - twitter: @ MikesPS4 - twitch.tv/mxmarks - "Yes, mxmarks is the King of Queens" - Unbreakable Vow
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    I've heard both, just like 'drywall' and 'sheet rock'. Not sure about 'weed whip' though. I say drywall and weed whacker.

    Probably due to Midwest being you know, in the middle.

    Weed whacker to me always implied a trimmer had blades instead of string

    This may have been due to my great uncle who lived out in the country referring to string trimmers as "useless piece of shit string trimmers"

    MichaelLCElvenshae
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    mxmarks wrote: »
    Hey house thread I have an electrical question because I know jack shit about electrical.

    We had some people come clean our house today, and when they left I went into the kitchen and noticed...one of the fucking outlets clearly had been on fire. I wasn't home while they were here, and my wife was on a different floor of the house while they cleaned. No one mentioned it at all and when they left we said thanks and they didn't mention it.

    I don't know anything about this stuff and don't want to get anyone in trouble but like, they did SOMETHING to cause this, right? I'm putting a picture in spoilers because someone smarter than me can look at it and maybe confirm that for me. I don't think outlets just do this.

    Also, is it safe now? We're clearly not using it anymore but I can't kill the breaker because the fridge is on it.
    wdbup5cvpzov.jpg

    I killed the breaker and looked behind the plate and everything back there looks OK- no damage or burn marks or anything. So I'm assuming this is a simple home depot trip to get a new outlet.

    But what the hell, how do you not mention this!?

    Honestly, they may not have noticed. When something like that happens if they don't smell it and it doesn't actually smoke they probably wouldn't see it, just pull the plug and move on.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    DoodmannAbsoluteZero
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    Yeah if it was like, there was a clump of lint on the plug and they didn't notice then it'll burn up quickly and leave a bunch of residue but might not be noticed.

    If the wires coming into the receptacle look good (ie, insulation isn't charred or anything) then the whole issue was probably just on the plug/receptacle interface and a new receptacle should be all you need.

    Also: splurge and get the $2 receptacles instead of the $0.80 ones, see my posts a few pages back, heh.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
    mxmarksSiliconStewShadowfireElvenshaeGilgaronthatassemblyguyJebusUDMazzyxAbsoluteZero
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited May 18
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    mxmarks wrote: »
    Hey house thread I have an electrical question because I know jack shit about electrical.

    We had some people come clean our house today, and when they left I went into the kitchen and noticed...one of the fucking outlets clearly had been on fire. I wasn't home while they were here, and my wife was on a different floor of the house while they cleaned. No one mentioned it at all and when they left we said thanks and they didn't mention it.

    I don't know anything about this stuff and don't want to get anyone in trouble but like, they did SOMETHING to cause this, right? I'm putting a picture in spoilers because someone smarter than me can look at it and maybe confirm that for me. I don't think outlets just do this.

    Also, is it safe now? We're clearly not using it anymore but I can't kill the breaker because the fridge is on it.
    wdbup5cvpzov.jpg

    I killed the breaker and looked behind the plate and everything back there looks OK- no damage or burn marks or anything. So I'm assuming this is a simple home depot trip to get a new outlet.

    But what the hell, how do you not mention this!?

    Honestly, they may not have noticed. When something like that happens if they don't smell it and it doesn't actually smoke they probably wouldn't see it, just pull the plug and move on.

    Maybe, but seems like they'd hear the pop or notice the char on the plug. If they ripped the vacuum plug out from across the room which could be the cause.

    But yes, should be fine if wires look ok.

    Could put some painters tape over the outlet as a reminder not to use it if not replacing right away.

    Is it close enough to water to be a GFCI? Have fun with all the new outlets and those goddamn safety fins.

    MichaelLC on
  • mxmarksmxmarks Registered User regular
    No GFCl, fortunately. It's on the opposite wall from the sink and everything.

    Thanks for the help. I'll grab a new outlet tomorrow and I should be able to replace it. I'm pretty inept but changed a light switch here already and imagine its similar.

    I feel kind of bad now, I called the cleaning service kind of mad and left a message, and emailed pictures. I stressed that I really didn't care if it was thier fault, our outlets fault or whatever - I just wanted to know what happened so I knew if I needed to act immediately to stop a possible fire or what. I hope my ignorance doesn't get anyone in trouble. I see now how it's possible they may haven't have noticed (although it does look like they tried to wipe some soot off the wall and the plate). But now that I know its not an immediate danger and a $3 fix I wish I never said anything.

    PSN: mxmarks - WiiU: mxmarks - twitter: @ MikesPS4 - twitch.tv/mxmarks - "Yes, mxmarks is the King of Queens" - Unbreakable Vow
  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    In new builds a fridge should be on its own circuit, so unplugging vacuum cleaners haphazardly doesn't trip the breaker and ruin your food (and floor if the ice leaks out). So, if you don't want/need an outlet there, it wouldn't be wrong to wire nut the wires like-to-like and put a blank cover plate on, either.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Brushless drill and $30 coupon. 2 batteries + drill + charger + screw bits for $60. Worth it if you want to have a drill to keep in the car or "go kit".

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0829VHGKJ/

    Shadowfire
Sign In or Register to comment.