Options

[Board Games] Climbing out of our hovels to play in meatspace

17980828485

Posts

  • Options
    FryFry Registered User regular
    I recently played a six player game of Clue (at work, lol) having not played it in decades. I was shocked by how fast I was able to narrow the whole thing down to a 50/50. Part of that was a new feature they'd added since my youth: if you roll a 1, there's a new deck of special cards you get to draw from, that tend to dish out a ton of information. But even beyond that, when players only have three cards in hand each, you can learn an absurd amount about what everyone has or doesn't have if you put in a little effort tracking it on the helpful note sheets.

  • Options
    WhelkWhelk Registered User regular
    Player count alone makes a humongous difference

  • Options
    DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    My gaming group has really taken to Heat and I keep becoming more and more a fan of the game. Overall it's a ridculously streamlined collection of mechanics that is easy to teach and grasp (especially as a gateway game) but has a significant moment-to-moment challenge that satisfies even the experienced players at our table.

    The last game we played had 1 legend (the AI bot, also super easy to run) and 5 players (two of which had never played the game before). The experienced players eked out a 1st and 2nd place, one of the new players got 3rd, and the legend came in at 4th. A great time was had by all and it was extremely close the whole time with significant shift between all of the positions.

    I cannot recommend it enough.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • Options
    RiemannLivesRiemannLives Registered User regular
    Yeah Heat is really good

    Attacked by tweeeeeeees!
  • Options
    TertieeTertiee Registered User regular
    Do you recommend using the garage module for first time players? I hear the game is a lot better with it but drafting with new players tends to not go well.

  • Options
    RiemannLivesRiemannLives Registered User regular
    If they are new to board games in general then probably not. If they have played anything even medium-weight before then it is a very simple addition and worth doing.

    Attacked by tweeeeeeees!
  • Options
    abotkinabotkin Registered User regular
    Haven't been lurking the board game thread like I should, so I'm not up on what's new and hip, but my wife and I are attending Geekway to the West, a 4 day board gaming convention here in STL. I thought about posting about it here back when registration was open, but forgot, so apologies to anyone that didn't know about it but would have liked to go.

    Anywho, today was the first day and we played seven games that were new to us. A few of these were demoed by someone, several were just my wife and I, and the last one was a scheduled "newbie" game.

    Sail - Two player trick taking game themed around sailing a ship past a kraken. It was pretty fun, but didn't wow either of us.

    Nimalia - We played with 4 total, this was a fun variant on a tile game, you have square cards divided into four with different animals on different terrain, and you overlap each new card you add. It's played over a number of rounds, everyone drawing and drafting a hand of 3 cards, trying to score against a rotating group of goals (4 different scoring criteria that are each valid in different rounds, with 2 or 3 going in a given round).

    Digsaw - This was a weird one, but it was a lot of fun. Each person gets a sheet of paper and pair of scissors, you roll the two dice, each of which has numbers and colors, and then each person picks a color from one die and the number from the other die, and cuts that many line segments of that color. Your goal is to cut each of a bunch of different "artifacts" out of the paper so they wind up on their own, but you've got restrictions on how you can cut, and if you mess up or can't make a valid cut, you have to take a penalty, which reduces the point value of one of the three types of artifacts. It's kind of a mess trying to type it out and explain it, but it was a lot of fun.

    Shake That City - Fun tile placement game, whose big gimmick is the cardboard box you build to put the cubes into, which you then shake each round, and then push a lever that produces a 3x3 grid of cubes for you. The active player then picks one of the colors of cubes, and places that many matching tiles on their board in the same configuration as the cubes. Every other player gets to pick any other color than the active player's and place those matching tiles on their boards, again in the same configuration as the cubes. The different buildings/tiles score differently at the end, and there's bonus tiles based on which buildings are in a given column/row. We really liked this one too.

    Canvas - They had it bundled with an expansion, but we'd never played before so we just did the base game. It's a game where you are an artist and you need to create 3 paintings. You start with the 3 backgrounds you'll use in card sleeves, and then on your turn, you either draw an "art card" (basically partial animation cells, so you can layer them atop one another) or create a painting by layering 3 of the art cards on top of a background and then scoring it based on the criteria chosen for that game (4 different things from a deck of about 20 or so). This was pretty fun, and very high quality (although I think this was a special edition), but a bit simple, so I'm not surprised they had the expansion with it. It was also pretty quick once we understood how the game worked.

    Worldbreakers - An interesting card game themed around an alt-history version of the Khanate. It was kind of Magic-esque in how it played, but I didn't get a very good explanation on if it's an all inclusive game or expandable and/or collectible. The game flow was kind of neat, there's a back and forth one action each for 4 actions apiece and then a cleanup phase, it's clearly designed to be a faster paced game. We only played once, and my wife got a bit hosed on the shuffling. She didn't like it overly much, I thought it was alright.

    Blood on the Clocktower - A very involved variant on the werewolf genre, this session was for newbies hosted by someone that knows how to run the game (someone explicitly has to GM). Everyone has a special role of some sort, and dead characters get to stick around and continue to participate, but their powers cease to work, they can't nominate anyone for the execution vote, and they only get a single final ghost vote to use whenever they decide. I had a lot of fun, but I was also probably a large factor in why the village lost. In my defense, I was given the Fortune Teller role, but was secretly the Drunk, so my power was actually giving me unreliable info, plus with it being a beginner game, the evil people made a very weird choice on who to kill the first night, but then played much smarter later. My wife isn't a huge fan of social deduction/intrigue games, and this one didn't move the needle on that for her, but there's apparently a group that gets together twice a month to play and I might have to look them up.


    Anywho, it's now stupid late and my wife wanted to get an early start tomorrow.

    steam_sig.png
    3DS: 0963-0539-4405
  • Options
    AthenorAthenor Battle Hardened Optimist The Skies of HiigaraRegistered User regular
    edited May 17
    Mayday has launched a new KS for their Crokinole boards.

    I've already got one (and even have it hanging on my wall finally), so I don't need to go in for another.

    However, they really have expanded their line of accessories, which is awesome.

    Notably this time around, they've improved their piece holding case with magnets so it won't randomly come open in transport (a legit issue with their design). They also have started selling wax themselves, which is great considering it's actually kind of hard to find the right kind of pure car wax around here!

    I passed on getting a carrying case before, but after taking it to other places to play twice, I can see the appeal.

    Most interesting to me, though? A clock accessory.

    KfClqVBh.jpg

    Not gonna lie... I kinda sorta REALLY Want this. :D They say all the accessories are available separately from the boards, so I will need to look into that.

    Athenor on
    He/Him | "A boat is always safest in the harbor, but that’s not why we build boats." | "If you run, you gain one. If you move forward, you gain two." - Suletta Mercury, G-Witch
  • Options
    abotkinabotkin Registered User regular
    Not sure I have the energy for a big write up tonight, but I'll probably come back and add some more info later. For now, just a basic list of the games we played today, and something I should have done last night: a link to list of games we can check out to play and get a chance to win a copy of the game by rating it afterwards. If anyone wants to look through it and suggest some games to try out, I'd love to hear them. No promises on actually playing everything suggested, wife veto is a thing, but we're about to start running low on games that we haven't played before, have heard something good about, and want to play.

    CoLab - Wife played this while I had to run some errands, and she loved it.
    Tranquility - Low communication card game very similar to The Mind if you've played that, but the cards get played onto a 6x6 grid and you have to balance forced discards. We both liked it.
    Brigands - Pretty cool worker placement game with adversarial workers. The two player variant we used was cool, but it also has an asymmetrical aspect normally where one player is the Prince vs the rest of the Brigands. We both liked this one a lot.
    Raising Robots - A really cool engine building game with a fun theme. Kind of a mashup of Wingspan and Fantastic Factories maybe? It had a lot of neat ideas that I liked. I really liked this one, my wife enjoyed it but less so.
    Paint the Roses - Alice in Wonderland themed cooperative tile laying logic puzzle. We both loved this one. I felt a little bad, but also pretty smug that I had to correct the demonstrator on one of the rules, but they'd gotten confused about a very key rule that would have made the game much more difficult. Which also explains why they hadn't won either of their first two games before playing with us. There's apparently already an expansion for this, we're going to be checking it out in the vendor area tomorrow.
    Wandering Towers - A fun game involving wizards and cardboard towers both moving around a track, towers capable of both carrying or capturing wizards with their movement. Caught wizards provide enough magic to empower one potion, which can then be used to cast different spells. You try and get your wizards all into a special tower while also empowering all your potions before anyone else can. We both enjoyed this one a fair amount.
    Daybreak - Cooperative game from the designer of Pandemic, kind of reminds me of a cross between Pandemic and Terraforming Mars with a global warming theme. Each person has their own player board representing a country or region, each with slightly different starting conditions. I thought it looked fun and interesting, but it was too crunchy of a game that we tried to start too late at night without having played it before, so we had to give it up after the first round. Wife was very meh on it, so not sure if we'll go back to play a full game or not this weekend.
    The Blueprint of Mad King Ludwig - I've never played the original Castle game either, but I think they're somewhat similar, although this one has you drawing/tracing the blueprint on a sheet of "velum" (not sure what it actually is, but it's some form of thicker tracing paper) with colored pencils. We grabbed this at the same time as Daybreak, and were going to play it if we had time, but Daybreak put the kibosh on another hour plus game. Looked like something we'd enjoy though, so we might grab it again if we can.
    WayWords - After we left and realized we'd missed the last shuttle back to where we'd parked, we had to wait for a ride, so we tried out this prototype. It billed itself as a 20 minute game, but it took us that long to skim the rules and play the first round, although I could see it being quick once you know it better. We didn't love it as-is, but this was one of about 8 prototypes that people submitted specifically to get feedback on, so we're giving them our thoughts.

    And all that after I said I wasn't going to go into details. Ah well.

    steam_sig.png
    3DS: 0963-0539-4405
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    @Athenor See, i was really tempted by this - i'd like to get a Croinkle board myself, but then i did my googling and... ugh. The stuff i'm finding on the shipping issues was horrific. Which given i'm off in NZ, it's just not something i'm willing to risk - i'd rather save all the way up and get a fancy once - sure, it's more than twice the cost, but.. Quality and reputability on such a purchase matter, and Mayday does not seem to have that =(

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    furlionfurlion Riskbreaker Lea MondeRegistered User regular
    We got a used copy of Flashpoint and all of its expansions for $80 from our local game store. My wife has been wanting our own copy for awhile now and this one is basically brand new so we splurged on it. At this rate we are going to need more shelves or to get rid of some of our games. Probably the latter given how little room we have in the house.

    sig.gif Gamertag: KL Retribution
    PSN:Furlion
  • Options
    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    My advice re: space for games: put expansions and grabbed together in 1 box and throw out the empty box. And put multiple small games in one box. I'm working on building my own and I literally the out 10 boxes and it all for in a box slightly smaller than a single IKEA Kallax square.

  • Options
    furlionfurlion Riskbreaker Lea MondeRegistered User regular
    Aldo wrote: »
    My advice re: space for games: put expansions and grabbed together in 1 box and throw out the empty box. And put multiple small games in one box. I'm working on building my own and I literally the out 10 boxes and it all for in a box slightly smaller than a single IKEA Kallax square.

    I have a 3d printer so making custom boxes is not a big deal fortunately. I do not however know how to design shit lol. I should probably learn how to design simple shapes so i can make boxes that more efficiently pack our games together.

    sig.gif Gamertag: KL Retribution
    PSN:Furlion
  • Options
    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    Using strong enough filament to make boxes seems like a waste of material. I just bought a few sheets of cardboard and cut and folded my own box. I overengineered it a bit with 2 layers and a pull-out tray, but the basic shape is easy. I used https://www.templatemaker.nl/en/ for the templates.

    There is some fun stuff with 3D-printed trays or just printing cooler looking game pieces, a lot can be found through boardgamegeeks forums. For instance, dorky birds for your Wingspan https://boardgamegeek.com/filepage/178450/3d-printed-birds-to-replace-action-cubes

  • Options
    tzeentchlingtzeentchling Doctor of Rocks OaklandRegistered User regular
    MrBody wrote: »
    Brainleech wrote: »
    Ketar wrote: »
    Nobody actually played with the pawns or cheese slices, right?

    Every time any Trivia game got pulled out, people looked at the board, didn't remember the rules for using them (and reading the rules was way more effort than anyone wanting to play Trivial Pursuit was ready for), and just passed the box of questions around the couch, taking turns seeing who could answer the most.

    The rules for Trivial Pursuit are: roll die, move that many spaces in any direction, answer a question of the color on the space you land on, if you get the question right roll again and repeat AND if you were on one of the larger spaces where you can earn a piece and answered correctly take said piece if you don't already have one of that color. The first to answer a question correctly while on the middle space after collecting all 6 pie pieces wins.

    When I used to actually play Trivial Pursuit in the 80s and 90s I don't think I knew anyone who didn't just know the rules. It's an incredibly simple rule set!

    Clue and Trivial had special rules for me
    I could not guess who in Clue until someone else did first [I could figure it out by the third turn} With Trivial if I got a question wrong I got the pieces dumped And I had to make a full lap around the board before I went to the center?
    But I learned how to play games like Clue and Mastermind when I was 2 or 3 because my mother was bored

    Dear Penthouse,

    I had tons of free time in the womb, so I was able to figure out the perfect Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots defense. We had to handicap me with special rules that I had to take a real life uppercut to the jaw before every round. When I was 2.

    Also I figured out the Clue solution before the cards were even shuffled and dealt.

    Well, I'm not surprised, you were the murder victim after all.

  • Options
    CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Fry wrote: »
    I recently played a six player game of Clue (at work, lol) having not played it in decades. I was shocked by how fast I was able to narrow the whole thing down to a 50/50. Part of that was a new feature they'd added since my youth: if you roll a 1, there's a new deck of special cards you get to draw from, that tend to dish out a ton of information. But even beyond that, when players only have three cards in hand each, you can learn an absurd amount about what everyone has or doesn't have if you put in a little effort tracking it on the helpful note sheets.

    I loved Clue as a kid. I even unironically loved the Clue VHS game (in my defense, I was 6). But yeah, as an adult it's less a game of deduction and more an annoying experience of random rolls determining who can get to the right places to win the game.

    Nowadays if I want a deduction game I go for either Mystery Express or Awkward Guests. I've played several games of each and never felt 100% certain at the end. Which I guess could be a detriment depending on your feelings about deduction games. I particularly love/hate the time component of Mystery Express. Someone flips through a deck of unmarked clock cards with multiple copies of each time and one fewer copy of the time of death. No note-taking during the flipping, you just gotta try to remember what times you see as they go by. It's a great mechanic and I am terrible at it.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • Options
    abotkinabotkin Registered User regular
    And I'm back with the summary of the last two days' games. Would have been sooner, but Saturday we didn't do a lot, and then when we got home Sunday, our thermostat had died and that turned into a whole thing. So anyway, I'm typing this up Tuesday morning and hoping I don't forget anything.

    Boop - This was actually a tournament for Boop that we entered. If you aren't familiar with the game, Boop is kind of an advanced tic-tac-toe, where each player takes turns placing kittens on a 6x6 "bed" playing board, and a kitten placed next to other kittens will "boop" them away one space. And when you line up three kittens, they get removed from the board and upgraded into 3 cat pieces that work the same, with the caveat that cats are too big for kittens to boop, only other cats make them move. And then the first person to get 3 cats in a line or all 8 cats on the board at once wins. My wife and I played several games in preparation, but didn't think to re-read the rules beforehand, so we both ended up losing at least one of our matches because of rules we'd completely forgotten about. Still fun, but took up a decent chunk of time on a day that we already couldn't make the morning of.

    Woodcraft - Ugh. I'm fairly certain we'd like this game a lot once we learned it really well, but I don't know that we'd ever get there. The game is an engine-builder themed around making things out of wood, and it has a really cool action wheel that gives bonuses to the less frequently chosen actions. The two major problems we had are 1) that the rulebook is hefty and you pretty much have to read it cover to cover (and I just really disliked how they did a lot of it - there are a bunch of sections that incorporate examples into the explanation of the rules, but then leave out some of the rules in their summary) and 2) that there is basically nothing to do on other players' turns, and particularly as new players, turns took a long time, so there is a ton of downtime. Very mixed feelings on this one. Increased Raising Robots' standing in my wife's view because that one has everyone taking their turns simultaneously.

    Decorum: Movin Out - This was a demo play, and we were the only two to sign up for that slot, so the facilitator had us set up with the Movin Out expansion, which is 20 scenarios explicitly for two players, while the base game does 2-4 and I believe is random with its goals. You are trying decorate a new house in the original, and you're unsurprisingly moving out in the expansion. Each player gets a card with various criteria they need to meet related to color, object type, object style, and location (for example, all objects must match the color of the room they're in, or curios can only be packed in the spaceship, etc). On your turn, you change one thing and then the other player responds by saying they "love it", "hate it", or are indifferent based on whether it meets or breaks one of their criteria, no other communication is allowed until/unless you reach a "heart to heart" at rounds 15, 20, and 25, each of which lets each person share one of their criteria. We really enjoyed the expansion, not sure how different just the base game would be though.

    Paint the Roses - We revisited this both to see how it played with just two players, and to check it out from the Play and Win library since it was a demo play the first time. We still enjoyed it, but it's definitely harder with just two people. Every person has their own goal and can give clues and have theirs guessed in a given turn, so with only two people, you're only working with two goals at a time. We still had a lot of fun with it, including a super cheesy moment where we both happened to have the same goal at the same time, matching heart shape to heart shape, it was a straight up silly rom-com thing and we laughed quite a bit.

    WayWords - We also revisited this to give it a fairer shake before we gave feedback on it. Someone that knows the designer happened to be walking past while we were setting up and asked to join, which ended up great, because the game played a lot better with a third person. The game is like a cross between Wavelength and Codewords if you're familiar with those. There's a track numbered 1-12, 3 to a side around the square score board. At each of the 4 corners goes a word. In the coop version we played, the active player will draw a "pin" card that will indicate one of the numbered spaces, and then they give a one word clue to try and indicate which space it is based on how their clue relates to the two words on that side.

    Maple Valley - This was the last Play and Win game we checked out, and we ran out time to finish it, but we got about halfway and had a lot of fun with it. It's a cute animal village themed game where you're trying to complete favors in order to help prepare the best possible festival. You have Helpers, cards of characters with different abilities and that allow you to take one or more types of trail (water, ground, and forest I think?). On your turn, you travel around the board by playing one of your helpers that will let you move along any length of trail of their matching type, plus any bonus movement you might want to take before or after, and then take the action at whichever location you wound up at. You get some resources just by crossing them on their path, but most are foraged at locations. There are a few special locations that let you get more Helpers, badges for special abilities, extra favors to complete, etc. It was a good deal of fun for what we played.

    Tiny Epic Kingdoms - While we waited for them to tabulate the Play and Win results to see if we got any free games, we played this. We'd never played any of the Tiny Epic games before, but this was pretty fun. This version at least is essentially (and explicitly, says so on the box) a very simplified 4x game. We didn't finish before they'd posted the winners, and we were tired enough that we just called it early. We liked it okay, I'd be happy to give it a full play another time.

    Tesseract - We played a single round of an in progress game as a demonstration at the publisher's booth, it was pretty cool though. The game is about trying to cooperatively "safely" remove all the dice from this large dice cube you build on a spinnable stand. Players each get a character with different abilities, and you earn different levels of researched abilities, and you have to combine them efficiently to win.


    We wound up both winning a game from the Play and Win library, which we were super stoked with since only roughly 1 in 4 people could get something. I won a copy of Daybreak and my wife won a copy of Maple Valley. They're used, by virtue of how the whole thing works, but we double checked and were only missing 1 token or card from each game, and they weren't vital components.

    Anywho, overall we had a lot of fun at Geekway to the West 24. As I think I mentioned before, this was our first time attending, but I do believe we're planning on making this a yearly thing now though, particularly since we live in the area. We played over 20 new games across 4 days, got numerous freebies, won two pretty nice games, and it didn't cost too much. It's all run by volunteers, almost everything is included, the only thing we paid for aside from the tickets was our food and a couple things from the vendor hall. We played most of our games with just the two of us, but they had multiple ways of getting more players for games if you wanted. Highly recommend it for anyone in the midwest that enjoys playing games.

    steam_sig.png
    3DS: 0963-0539-4405
  • Options
    furlionfurlion Riskbreaker Lea MondeRegistered User regular
    Aldo wrote: »
    Using strong enough filament to make boxes seems like a waste of material. I just bought a few sheets of cardboard and cut and folded my own box. I overengineered it a bit with 2 layers and a pull-out tray, but the basic shape is easy. I used https://www.templatemaker.nl/en/ for the templates.

    There is some fun stuff with 3D-printed trays or just printing cooler looking game pieces, a lot can be found through boardgamegeeks forums. For instance, dorky birds for your Wingspan https://boardgamegeek.com/filepage/178450/3d-printed-birds-to-replace-action-cubes

    Maybe i should clarify i am not just making boxes, i am making organizer boxes. Especially for games with significant expansions this can save a bunch of space. Also cheap filament is dirt cheap. Like 1kg of filament for $10 and that is enough to make several very strong organizers/boxes.

    sig.gif Gamertag: KL Retribution
    PSN:Furlion
  • Options
    R-demR-dem Registered User regular
    Talisman is getting a 5th edition.

    Is Talisman a good game? Heck no!

    Is Talisman insanely fun? Heck yes!

    Am I adding this to my Talisman collection? You betcha!

    https://shop.hasbro.com/en-us/product/talisman-the-magical-quest-board-game-5-th-edition-fantasy-tabletop-adventure-games-12-plus/AA84B1F0-B14A-4209-94B5-21EF4C8B6A45

  • Options
    Jam WarriorJam Warrior Registered User regular
    edited May 24
    I think I'm too heavily invested in 4th.

    By which I mean I have it all.

    It became quite a big thing in our family during lockdown.

    Jam Warrior on
    MhCw7nZ.gif
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Testing out more natural modules. Playing with Jurassic + Natural Disasters this time around.

    First natural disaster: Hurricane Season! Makes it harder to forage. Next natural disaster: Ice Age! (Get big or freeze to death) both of which are going to expire at the same time. Then round three:

    Giant Meteor (Which immediately drove several creatures etinct). Also, no more food in the watering hole for the rest of game.

    Round four: ANOTHER giant meteor. (Driving yet another creature extinct).

    Round five: Just some volcanos. yet another another creature died, this time to lava flows.\

    Round six: Radioactive Meteor shower!

    ...It was pretty cinematic.

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    TertieeTertiee Registered User regular
    That does sounds very much like a Michael Bay movie, constant explosions to the point of exhaustion.

  • Options
    DirtmuncherDirtmuncher Registered User regular
    Sol last days of a star came out in 2017 and had a reprint campaign last year. After missing out on the first campaign I was finally able to pick it up for a reasonable price.

    A fun race game where you have to build up infrastructure to power up your orbiting mother ship.
    Played it for the first time yesterday and it was really great. You can only take one action per turn so no years of waiting even with four players.

    steam_sig.png
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Wohoo!

    I got in as an offical playtester for Nature. Which means i get a chance to shape how the game falls out (Well, more the fine balance of things. I aint doing any designing for it).

    Very excited about this, because it's already a fantastic game, and I'm really looking foward to helping crack some of the problems that have cropped up (like the Apex Predator issue in Jurassic/Artic Tundra. Where uh, big dino WIN)

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    A Half Eaten OreoA Half Eaten Oreo Registered User regular
    Wohoo!

    I got in as an offical playtester for Nature. Which means i get a chance to shape how the game falls out (Well, more the fine balance of things. I aint doing any designing for it).

    Very excited about this, because it's already a fantastic game, and I'm really looking foward to helping crack some of the problems that have cropped up (like the Apex Predator issue in Jurassic/Artic Tundra. Where uh, big dino WIN)

    I didn't even know there was a new Evolution being worked on. Now I know who to blame for any minor complaints I have.

  • Options
    ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Athenor wrote: »
    Seriously. Fuck locking gameplay behind KS exclusivity like this, especially when you package/produce it like a retail product. Just reprint the damned thing!

    While I backed the original campaign (and sold off must of what I received ages ago, and really should get around to selling off the base game and my Thunderjaw), I don't have any direct ties to this particular company otherwise.

    However, I'd speculate that the issue is a matter of economy of scale.

    The original campaign had nearly 10,000 backers. Producing 10K+ of a product likely incurs some serious savings per unit.

    However, reprinting that same product in the thousands or even hundreds might not be nearly as viable at the same price point, and drastically raising said price point to account for that disparity will likely drive demand down to such a degree as it becomes untenable in the first place.

    Don't get me wrong; I agree that hiding actual game mechanics behind a hefty paywall isn't great. Alt sculpts and a handful of promo cards is one thing, but there was a rather large portion of content like that in the first campaign, as I recall, and while I admit it's an effective tool for getting people onboard, it's not very player/consumer friendly. I'm not a huge fan of the practice, nor am I advocating for it.

    But the costs to do a print run that's big enough to hit an affordable cost per unit breakpoint may require having a lot of warehouse space dedicated to storage of units they paid for and don't necessarily have buyers for.

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Wohoo!

    I got in as an offical playtester for Nature. Which means i get a chance to shape how the game falls out (Well, more the fine balance of things. I aint doing any designing for it).

    Very excited about this, because it's already a fantastic game, and I'm really looking foward to helping crack some of the problems that have cropped up (like the Apex Predator issue in Jurassic/Artic Tundra. Where uh, big dino WIN)

    I didn't even know there was a new Evolution being worked on. Now I know who to blame for any minor complaints I have.

    Don't you lay that evil on me.

    Also, to be clear- this isnt a new "evolution" - it's an entirely stand alone game. It's very much building on the DNA from Evoloution, but it's genisis is in solving a lot of intractable problems that Evoloution had accumulated.

    The core of this is game is that while the base game of nature can be played by itself and is perfectly good, it's designed to work with adding modules - ideally 2 at a time. The base game will launch with five - Jurassic, Rainforest, Arctic Tundra, Natural Disasters and Flight.

    You can pick and mix these (exception: you can't play both Arctic Tundra and Rainforest at the same time, biome modules are mutually exclusive). Every module adds or tweaks the rules, and many of them add new trait decks to draw from. You can even if you're feeling especially spicy decide to stack Rainforest or Tunrdra together with Flight, Jurassic AND natural disasters. You'll be playing an 8 round game and i assume your brain will literally melt from option overload, But that's a choice you can make!. (a normal game is 4 rounds, each module adds +1 round. You can tweak this up or down for longer or shorter games, just agree before hand since it can cause some odd swings or block a player from suddenly clutching the win).

    If you're interested in trying it out, It's available on Talbetop simulator and i'm very happy to teach people. There's also an app version, with instructions in this handy dandy link - Do note that the app version does not have any modules currently, and the AI is only okay even on expert. Still, to learn the basics and some of the more advanced intricaties, it's pretty good. (also nice and fast).

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    AthenorAthenor Battle Hardened Optimist The Skies of HiigaraRegistered User regular
    Yesterday I got to play a bit of Tales from The Red Dragon Inn, Slugfest's stab at a narrative co-op game (as opposed to Battle for Greyport, which was in the style of the Crossfire games).

    I'm fairly glad I passed on it, but only because I don't know who I would play it with.

    The Good: The core rules themselves are fairly simple and intuitive. It's essentially a tactics skirmish style wargame, where they are not worried about things like line of sight. each character gets 2 actions and a "Shenanigans" when it is their go, and they have a bunch of abilities that use those resources along with cooldown tokens. Everything pretty much auto-hits at a base level, though there are exploding dice and things you can do to ramp up the damage. The game starts you with a subset of your full abilities, and then introduces the rest over the first few scenarios. Rather than using a book or something, they use a series of double sided laminated posters with mission-specific timings and the enemy stat blocks on them. This means that you know what's coming up, but you also can set up very fast. The artwork is great as usual.

    The Meh: The beginning scenarios have you jumping between 3 different books to get things set up if I was following correctly. There's scenario setup and description book, an intro walkthrough book, and a rules reference/glossary. The idea of the walkthrough is to get your game going quickly.. but we literally sat there for 30 minutes or so just listening to it being read out loud. Add into that a bunch of prologue/epilogue flavor text, and.. well, I admit I was bored. At least with Freelancers, they had professional voice actors reading out things. I feel like they should've called out parts to go "read this once you have done X" or something. Instead it felt like a massive infodump. Which was annoying, because the rules were so exceedingly simple and easy to wrap your head around just based on iconography.

    The game has a TON of punchout tokens. Sure, it provides bags for them, but table space became quite the premium. Also remembering what they all do is a bit annoying, even with a reference card.

    I've heard that when you get deeper into the campaign, you don't get to play around with all the treasure/loot like you might wish, which is a bummer.

    The Bad: I don't see a ton of replayability in these campaigns. There's not a ton of randomness in the setup, at least as far as I was, and the "AI" for the baddies is fairly simple based on dice rolls. I saw people asking for more campaigns/maps and so on.. which makes sense. I personally think adding more characters is a must for the future. While I personally didn't play with the power trees, I also heard they don't add much in the way of character uniqueness or long term effects. Basically, while you do unlock things as you go through the campaign, they intentionally built it so you can character-hop. So you aren't attached to any one particular character or narrative.


    Like I said, I could see it being a fun romp. But compared to the other things in its space of narrative games, I just didn't see it bringing much new to the table. And if you aren't familiar with the characters from the other games, well.. I mean, I enjoyed seeing how Pooky interacted mechanically, and what it let Zot do. But I also felt bummed hearing that Wrench and Wizgille were referenced in the text so the chances of them getting characters is super slim.

    I dunno. Maybe I'm justifying not buying it. At least it doesn't have any exclusives that I'm aware of.

    (Pic is from when I realized I couldn't stick around for the second scenario, so I helped get things set up.)

    rQ0Bkfuh.jpg

    He/Him | "A boat is always safest in the harbor, but that’s not why we build boats." | "If you run, you gain one. If you move forward, you gain two." - Suletta Mercury, G-Witch
  • Options
    A Half Eaten OreoA Half Eaten Oreo Registered User regular
    Wohoo!

    I got in as an offical playtester for Nature. Which means i get a chance to shape how the game falls out (Well, more the fine balance of things. I aint doing any designing for it).

    Very excited about this, because it's already a fantastic game, and I'm really looking foward to helping crack some of the problems that have cropped up (like the Apex Predator issue in Jurassic/Artic Tundra. Where uh, big dino WIN)

    I didn't even know there was a new Evolution being worked on. Now I know who to blame for any minor complaints I have.

    Don't you lay that evil on me.

    Also, to be clear- this isnt a new "evolution" - it's an entirely stand alone game. It's very much building on the DNA from Evoloution, but it's genisis is in solving a lot of intractable problems that Evoloution had accumulated.

    The core of this is game is that while the base game of nature can be played by itself and is perfectly good, it's designed to work with adding modules - ideally 2 at a time. The base game will launch with five - Jurassic, Rainforest, Arctic Tundra, Natural Disasters and Flight.

    You can pick and mix these (exception: you can't play both Arctic Tundra and Rainforest at the same time, biome modules are mutually exclusive). Every module adds or tweaks the rules, and many of them add new trait decks to draw from. You can even if you're feeling especially spicy decide to stack Rainforest or Tunrdra together with Flight, Jurassic AND natural disasters. You'll be playing an 8 round game and i assume your brain will literally melt from option overload, But that's a choice you can make!. (a normal game is 4 rounds, each module adds +1 round. You can tweak this up or down for longer or shorter games, just agree before hand since it can cause some odd swings or block a player from suddenly clutching the win).

    If you're interested in trying it out, It's available on Talbetop simulator and i'm very happy to teach people. There's also an app version, with instructions in this handy dandy link - Do note that the app version does not have any modules currently, and the AI is only okay even on expert. Still, to learn the basics and some of the more advanced intricaties, it's pretty good. (also nice and fast).

    That sounds really cool, will try TTS if I can find the time. I just skimmed it on bgg after reading you post and saw “reimplements Evolution” and figured it was a remake.

  • Options
    PMAversPMAvers Registered User regular
    oh my god yes, L99 announced we're getting a digital version of Bullet on Steam.

    persona4celestia.jpg
    COME FORTH, AMATERASU! - Switch Friend Code SW-5465-2458-5696 - Twitch
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Wohoo!

    I got in as an offical playtester for Nature. Which means i get a chance to shape how the game falls out (Well, more the fine balance of things. I aint doing any designing for it).

    Very excited about this, because it's already a fantastic game, and I'm really looking foward to helping crack some of the problems that have cropped up (like the Apex Predator issue in Jurassic/Artic Tundra. Where uh, big dino WIN)

    I didn't even know there was a new Evolution being worked on. Now I know who to blame for any minor complaints I have.

    Don't you lay that evil on me.

    Also, to be clear- this isnt a new "evolution" - it's an entirely stand alone game. It's very much building on the DNA from Evoloution, but it's genisis is in solving a lot of intractable problems that Evoloution had accumulated.

    The core of this is game is that while the base game of nature can be played by itself and is perfectly good, it's designed to work with adding modules - ideally 2 at a time. The base game will launch with five - Jurassic, Rainforest, Arctic Tundra, Natural Disasters and Flight.

    You can pick and mix these (exception: you can't play both Arctic Tundra and Rainforest at the same time, biome modules are mutually exclusive). Every module adds or tweaks the rules, and many of them add new trait decks to draw from. You can even if you're feeling especially spicy decide to stack Rainforest or Tunrdra together with Flight, Jurassic AND natural disasters. You'll be playing an 8 round game and i assume your brain will literally melt from option overload, But that's a choice you can make!. (a normal game is 4 rounds, each module adds +1 round. You can tweak this up or down for longer or shorter games, just agree before hand since it can cause some odd swings or block a player from suddenly clutching the win).

    If you're interested in trying it out, It's available on Talbetop simulator and i'm very happy to teach people. There's also an app version, with instructions in this handy dandy link - Do note that the app version does not have any modules currently, and the AI is only okay even on expert. Still, to learn the basics and some of the more advanced intricaties, it's pretty good. (also nice and fast).

    That sounds really cool, will try TTS if I can find the time. I just skimmed it on bgg after reading you post and saw “reimplements Evolution” and figured it was a remake.

    While I haven't played Evolution, it kinda is in some respects. There's still a watering hole, you're still adding traits to creatures.

    It's just a lot, lot more refined, there's excellent catch-up mechanics that mean predators are simply predatory, not absolute blowouts, etc.

    It's good stuff!

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Things wot are fun in Nature: Bomb Frogs.

    Okay, to explain: Nature's module of Rainforest adds a bluffing element - traits aren't revealed until a player chooses to reveal them. (Normally they reveal at the end of the adapting phase). One of Rainforest's cards is "Poisonous". Attack a poisonous creature? You loose 4 population (This is at least 2 card discards, in a game where you will draw 25-30 cards at most, it's pretty hefty). Then you get a poison counter, which reduces the amount you loose to poison the next time you attack a poisonous creature.

    At various points in teh game, it's highly likely to have a size 1, population 1 creature you don't really care about. So rather than leave it to be a free meal for someone... Stick poisonous on it! If they attack it? they loose 4 population, you get the poisoin card back and the size rolls over to your next creature. If they don't attack it, you can probably safely snaffle 1 food from the watering hole anyway, and that's an easy point... and if it's the final round of the game, every surviving creature is worth an additional 2 points. So littering your field with bomb frogs is a hilariously effective way to leave your opponents going "...ah, shit".

    Even better, under the rules currently, if a Predator has hungry population and there's a valid target on the field? The predator HAS to attack it. So bomb frogs can be very very effective as a counter to predators running around.

    Anyway, this is how round one of a game lead to a pair of extinctions due to bomb frog incidents

    (Further fun: Poisonous stacks. Sure, they got 3 poison resistance counters, but they also just lost 12 population in one hit. The predator is probably dead now. )

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    DrascinDrascin Registered User regular
    edited June 1
    Making pain creatures was a useful tactic in Evolution, too. Really, we often found Predators in Evo to be a risky gambit. It was too easy to neutralize any predator without Intelligence and cause them to starve due to having no valid targets, or straight up suicide themselves on horned prey.

    This game rather sounds like an improved and updated version of Evo with lessons learned in the intervening years - which given that Evo is one of my favorite games ever, well, it's certainly a thing I want to keep in mind!

    Drascin on
    Steam ID: Right here.
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Drascin wrote: »
    Making pain creatures was a useful tactic in Evolution, too. Really, we often found Predators in Evo to be a risky gambit. It was too easy to neutralize any predator without Intelligence and cause them to starve due to having no valid targets, or straight up suicide themselves on horned prey.

    This game rather sounds like an improved and updated version of Evo with lessons learned in the intervening years - which given that Evo is one of my favorite games ever, well, it's certainly a thing I want to keep in mind!

    It pretty much literally is - it's gensisis as i understand it was Dom wanting to do various things, realising that Evoloution's rules just didn't support these things, and so work on Nature started. It's been in progress since 2017 iirc.

    Once again, do hit me up if you'd like to learn it and you have tabletop simulator.

    I find predators are basically ssome degree of mandatory in Nature. There's simply never enough food in the watering hole for everyone to feed, and while you can discard cards to refill some of it, discarding one card for 4 food for one turn is a only okay return. Predators can result in 5 point swings (you gain 4 food which'll become score, opponent looses 1 population) multiple times in one turn, which is really really strong. On the flipside, Predators rely on you correctly reading the field and knowing when you've got targets you can hit vs not, while also defending yourself from other predators. One of my favorite combos for instance is the Climbing/Camouflage/<predatory trait of choice> size 4 critter you can make when using Flight & Rainforest. You'll have between 5-8 attack, you can only be attacked by something that's got both Climbing and Camouflage AND has at least 4 attack and you can hit anything on the field as long as it's not got Fast, though you'll pay if they're Horned or Poisonous.

    Stealth Bear as I've fondly nicknamed it has won me a lot of games. Even more fun, Rainforest has Omnivore (makes you a predator, but you can still forage like a herbivore - which opens up a bunch of cheeky tactics for causing Herbivores to starve to death) or Strong Jaws (predator, you gain +3 attack, meaning you can easily punch straight through most thing's defences), giving you a lot of flexibility in how you put the Stealth Bear together.

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    DrascinDrascin Registered User regular
    edited June 3
    Honestly, the addition of flat +lotsapower cards in Oceans and less categorical "you can't attack this creature unless you have [Specific Card X]" cards already does a lot to make starting predators less of a risky thing.

    Back in Evo, you had the problem that since Size was basically both for attack and defense, and you had cards like Hard Shell that gave +4 effective Size defensively or Warning Call that made the adjacent creatures immune to attack unless the predator had a very specific ability and so on, but there weren't really any cards that gave +4 effective Size for attack (closest was Pack hunter, but that involved also raising your population before you could attack) and most of the counter-ignores were card specific so you could have a card to ignore Warning Call specifically but if then your target just changed that Warning Call for something else and you didn't have the card in hand to counter specifically what they dropped, you could either stop being a Predator at all or lose the critter entirely to starvation. It meant that it was a lot easier for the table to shut down a predator after the player had invested a ton of tempo in getting the predator up to par and capable of attacking things. Except for Intelligence, which let you discard a card to ignore any one trait when attacking.

    And also, well, it usually resulted that the watering hole had a bunch of food, while from what you say the food is greatly reduced in Nature, which would also exert pressure towards predators. It wasn't rare for turns to start with like, 25+ food or more in the watering hole. It felt often more rewarding to try to maximize your feeding speed to grab as much as possible from the hole before others than turning predator.

    So you saw people changing a creature into a Predator for exactly one turn, getting a big chomp out of someone, and then going back to herbivory like nothing happened the very next turn as people spent cards making their creatures immune to that predator. But actually *keeping* a predator on the board without Intelligence was often a risky play. Could have serious returns if people didn't call your bluff, but could also end up with you losing the creature after getting no points from it beyond its first turn.

    I'll probably download the Steam demo eventually and give it a quick check!

    Drascin on
    Steam ID: Right here.
  • Options
    MNC DoverMNC Dover Full-time Voice Actor Kirkland, WARegistered User regular
    edited June 3
    Back at the end of March, my friends and I discovered the old 1990s Middle Earth CCG was playable on TTS. We've been playing it over the last few months and having a blast.

    Got me thinking if anyone would be interested in me making some explainer/tutorial videos or stream our games? Would anyone watch content based around a CCG that has almost no modern mechanics?

    MNC Dover on
    Need a voice actor? Hire me at bengrayVO.com
    Legends of Runeterra: MNCdover #moc
    Switch ID: MNC Dover SW-1154-3107-1051
    Steam ID
    Twitch Page
  • Options
    The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    In Nature, Size is still attack and defence.

    There's a couple of things though: Size also is *food* for a predator - If a size 1 can somehow bring down a Size 8 (Yes, size 8 exist - if you're playing Jurassic. Which happens to have Elusive and Pack Hunter in it, almost as if tiny death swarms are intended stratergy) - you kill 1 of that creature's population, and then feed 8 of yours.

    Nature has 8 cards in it's deck (with 11 copies of each, creatures are limited to 3 traits). of those, 4 are defensive in nature

    Hard Shell gives you 4 defence (A predator has to equal or beat your defence to eat you)
    Horns makes any predator attacking loose population equal to the size
    Tusked gives you 2 defence (and another ability not relevant to defending you)
    Fast means you can only be attacked by a creature with equal or excess Fast stacks.

    Conversely, there's only Clawed (+2 Attack/+2 Forage) for boosting your predators directly. But a size 4 Clawed predator can take down anything that's not shelled or Horned, and it's easy to evolve fast. Predator is also a free trait to add, it doesnt cost you a card play (some of the optional modules add cards that make you a predator + some other ability, like Strong Jaws giving you +3 attack, at cost of using up one of your precious card plays - you only get 5 cards a turn, and there's only 4/5/6 rounds!)

    ...but Predators still rule, because they're the only way to get unlimited food in the game. Any creature a predator can attack is worth It's Population X It's Size food. When the watering hole has either 8, 12 or 16 food in a 4 player game... (the rest of nature;'s cards offer additional ways to make food - Like scavenging off other predator's kills or creating extra meat whenever you eat meat for any reason, and you can discard a card from your hand to get 2/3/4 food added to the watering hole)

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
    Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/id/TheZombiePenguin
    Stream: https://www.twitch.tv/thezombiepenguin/
    Switch: 0293 6817 9891
  • Options
    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    MNC Dover wrote: »
    Back at the end of March, my friends and I discovered the old 1990s Middle Earth CCG was playable on TTS. We've been playing it over the last few months and having a blast.

    Got me thinking if anyone would be interested in me making some explainer/tutorial videos or stream our games? Would anyone watch content based around a CCG that has almost no modern mechanics?

    Not personally, but the concept of someone explaining this old game in 1080p is pretty cool. If you would enjoy making it, don't let me stop you.

  • Options
    StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited June 4
    Oath is getting an expansion; KS campaign is live. All in on that.

    Red Dragon Inn is basically a beer and pretzels game like Munchkin, in that they have a thousand expansions and are popular what beyond what you’d expect. But RDI is far better designed* and the expansions give you more variety than what Munchkin tends to offer.

    *unless you consider Munchkin a scathing satire of power gaming in tabletop RPGs, in which I dare say it is one of the best designed game ever made

    Sterica on
    YL9WnCY.png
  • Options
    admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Sterica wrote: »
    Oath is getting an expansion; KS campaign is live. All in on that.

    My group finally got some momentum on Oath and has played three rounds over the last few months with another planned in a couple weeks, which did an excellent job of clearing up any guilt I might have about that Kickstarter.

    Of course I just got a shipping notice for Arcs.

Sign In or Register to comment.