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It's a [Kids] World. [Parents] Just Live in It

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    lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava ~~She/Her~~ Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    edited January 2023
    No, I mean, you're allowed to have your opinions and voice them.

    I will disagree on at least Peppa Pig (lots of things to pick upabout friendship, asking questions, pausing at life situations, not always winning, the sheer mundanity of life) plus i found some of the humour funny even as an adult.

    Blippy was just... Blippy is a 4 year old. just absolutely painfully a 4 year old. where everything is BIG and NEW and OH MY GOSH at a mile a minute and the 4 year old is trying desperately to seem as smart as they can be while telling you the most inane story ever and if you do not yet have a 4 year old *you will* and then you will see that it is Blippy.

    Cocomelon, from what i remember, is just kids songs. there's rhyming, rhythm, melody. Obnxious as fuck as an adult, but the kids are picking something up. Almost certainly not morals, but they're getting communication skills, language skills, recognizing tone, up and down, high and low.

    I don't know PInkalicious.


    I *despised* Barney & Friends growing up. it was pointless, horrible, and those high pitched voices?! UGH. But the kids that they were targeting as an audience did get stuff out of them. Most of it intangible, but still, stuff!


    Ellie used to watch this show called Baby Bus, pretty sure it's Chinese in origin, has 2 pandas and a bunch of other characters. She learned *so much* from watching these shows that i would never have taught her, or thought to teach her. what to do in an earthquake, what to do in a house fire, how to yell for help when a stranger is near. But also, counting in evens and odds, the concept of 0, and all sorts of other things.

    all in annoyingly high pitched voices.

    edit: like, nobody is learning any lessons from "Red Fish, Blue Fish" or "Goodnight Moon" or "Each Peach Pear Plum" but we still read them to our kids and they still get the idea of language and rhyme and rhythm and repeating lines and telling a story in words.

    Although I will say, "Good night Moon hits a *lot* different when you are the parent reading it and then watching your child resist sleep......

    lonelyahava on
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    SirToastySirToasty Registered User regular
    You know what toddler show I hate?

    Blaze.

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    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    's just... some shows seem to be made by people who seem to care about their audience and/or their craft. Other shows just don't have heart.

    Blaze and the Monster Machines is bullshit, I think because it follows the same structure with a needlessly evil antagonist. It'd be fine if it was just cheerful cars with big wheels and eyes teaching you about left and right.

    There's a bunch of shows that the kid just doesn't watch because they're crap, and then a few he doesn't watch because his parents dislike them and will tell him to find something else to watch instead. Like the CGI remakes of Fireman Sam and Postman Pat that are just so fucking ugly that it makes you angry that they even dared to name them after the OG stuff.

    I have a particular annoyance for shows that have an agenda: Veggie Tales with Christianity, Super Wings for repeating the South Korean state motto of working till you're dead and a bunch of Asian shows aimed at girls that repeat that it is An Absolute Good Thing to be of service to your parents and others in your community.

    Also hate hate hate shows that are nihilistic like Johnny Test and Masha & Bear.

    We uhh watched a wide range of cartoons in these Covid years. 😬

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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited January 2023
    Masha and The Bear is one of the very, very few shows that we blocked from our kids' Netflix profile so they couldn't watch it anymore , I think it was that and this French animated show about grubs that didn't have dialog and was both gross and pointless. I really don't like it.

    The Nickelodeon school of incredibly rigid structure and repetition (Dora, Blaze, et al) mostly drove me a little crazy but somehow Octonauts was ok, those little guys made me laugh and the creature report song never got old.

    Peen on
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    honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    edited January 2023
    Bluey is great, and it's often the kids just making their own story arc.

    Puffin Rock is okay, but really pretty at least.

    loosely related, our daughter has now watched her first actual movie - not in one sitting - Totoro. The first time some parts of it made her feel afraid, but now I guess we have to watch it several times again in the foreseeable future.

    honovere on
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    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    honovere wrote: »
    Bluey is great, and it's often the kids just making their own story arc.

    Puffin Rock is okay, but really pretty at least.

    loosely related, our daughter has now watched her first actual movie - not in one sitting - Totoro. The first time some parts of it made her feel afraid, but now I guess we have to watch it several times again in the foreseeable future.

    Also get Ponyo in that rotation, it's the other Miyazaki movie for young kids.

    When she's a little bit older Kiki's Delivery Service will also be right up her alley, it requires some context about what friendship is, but that one is just a great story about a young girl figuring out her place in the world and realizing that you can do fantastic things when you make friends and want to help people.

    (Flippin' love Ghibli)

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    schussschuss Registered User regular
    edited January 2023
    Peen wrote: »
    Every show you named is for pre-schoolers, there aren't going to be a whole lot of season long arcs for that crowd I'm afraid. Once you get into shows for older kids I think you'll find what you're looking for.

    Yep, attention spans are short at that age and permanence isn't there as they may not have been paying attention, so the characters are relatively static with a series of one-shots.

    I'll say one of my favorites is still octonauts, as it's mostly silly adventures but it's about discovery different unique sea creatures, so it's great.

    schuss on
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    Red RaevynRed Raevyn because I only take Bubble Baths Registered User regular
    I could talk all day about how much I like the show Hilda. Unfortunately the second season gets a little bit scarier so I haven't gotten to see most of it, but I've seen season 1 literally dozens and dozens of times over the last year and I still find it charming. The dialogue sounds real (and the voice acting is good) instead of that "this is for kids" sound, the art is beautiful, and it's creative and unique. Our daughter is only 2.5 but it's nuts how much she takes away from it.

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    She was too busy trying to pick up every shell on the beach to realize she missed the whole dang sunset
    cay9rtvbsunh.jpeg

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    FishmanFishman Put your goddamned hand in the goddamned Box of Pain. Registered User regular
    Spent all evening looking for an app that would allow me to whitelist a sleep sounds app from a downtime period for the 10yo first phone.

    God, parental control apps are so gross and invasive. Most made my skin crawl.

    X-Com LP Thread I, II, III, IV, V
    That's unbelievably cool. Your new name is cool guy. Let's have sex.
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    Zombie GandhiZombie Gandhi Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    Masha and The Bear is one of the very, very few shows that we blocked from our kids' Netflix profile so they couldn't watch it anymore , I think it was that and this French animated show about grubs that didn't have dialog and was both gross and pointless. I really don't like it.

    The Nickelodeon school of incredibly rigid structure and repetition (Dora, Blaze, et al) mostly drove me a little crazy but somehow Octonauts was ok, those little guys made me laugh and the creature report song never got old.

    Wait you can block shit from Netflix please teach me your ways.

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    DisruptedCapitalistDisruptedCapitalist I swear! Registered User regular
    edited January 2023
    I never liked the books for Pinkalicious. I thought the kid was incredibly poorly behaved and never even seems to learn her lesson.

    The show was annoying because they rewrote the character to be the most saccharine child ever and I still don't think she learns anything.

    DisruptedCapitalist on
    "Simple, real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time." -Mustrum Ridcully in Terry Pratchett's Hogfather p. 142 (HarperPrism 1996)
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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    Masha and The Bear is one of the very, very few shows that we blocked from our kids' Netflix profile so they couldn't watch it anymore , I think it was that and this French animated show about grubs that didn't have dialog and was both gross and pointless. I really don't like it.

    The Nickelodeon school of incredibly rigid structure and repetition (Dora, Blaze, et al) mostly drove me a little crazy but somehow Octonauts was ok, those little guys made me laugh and the creature report song never got old.

    Wait you can block shit from Netflix please teach me your ways.

    You have to do it through your web browser, you can't do it in the app, but it rules, whatever you block just disappears from their Netflix like it was never there. This video isn't the most professional but it's short and to the point without much YouTube nonsense.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=Bq099sjBHZA

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    PerrsunPerrsun Registered User regular
    edited January 2023
    Fishman wrote: »
    Spent all evening looking for an app that would allow me to whitelist a sleep sounds app from a downtime period for the 10yo first phone.

    God, parental control apps are so gross and invasive. Most made my skin crawl.

    I think iOS has this in the Screen Time stuff. Not sure about other phones. I know you can permit certain apps to work normally after a certain time, and others to need confirmation you actually want to open it.

    Perrsun on
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    Zombie GandhiZombie Gandhi Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    Masha and The Bear is one of the very, very few shows that we blocked from our kids' Netflix profile so they couldn't watch it anymore , I think it was that and this French animated show about grubs that didn't have dialog and was both gross and pointless. I really don't like it.

    The Nickelodeon school of incredibly rigid structure and repetition (Dora, Blaze, et al) mostly drove me a little crazy but somehow Octonauts was ok, those little guys made me laugh and the creature report song never got old.

    Wait you can block shit from Netflix please teach me your ways.

    You have to do it through your web browser, you can't do it in the app, but it rules, whatever you block just disappears from their Netflix like it was never there. This video isn't the most professional but it's short and to the point without much YouTube nonsense.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=Bq099sjBHZA

    Gah I kept trying to find something in app and gave up. Goodbye Grizzly and the Lemmings, burn in hell.

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    FishmanFishman Put your goddamned hand in the goddamned Box of Pain. Registered User regular
    Perrsun wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    Spent all evening looking for an app that would allow me to whitelist a sleep sounds app from a downtime period for the 10yo first phone.

    God, parental control apps are so gross and invasive. Most made my skin crawl.

    I think iOS has this in the Screen Time stuff. Not sure about other phones. I know you can permit certain apps to work normally after a certain time, and others to need confirmation you actually want to open it.

    Yeah, I think iOS might natively allows exceptions to timed app blocking. Unfortunately I'm using the Android ecosystem, which doesn't seem to allow these things easily.
    I'm trying out a few productivity apps to see if they do what I want.

    Thanks anyway.

    X-Com LP Thread I, II, III, IV, V
    That's unbelievably cool. Your new name is cool guy. Let's have sex.
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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    Perrsun wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    Spent all evening looking for an app that would allow me to whitelist a sleep sounds app from a downtime period for the 10yo first phone.

    God, parental control apps are so gross and invasive. Most made my skin crawl.

    I think iOS has this in the Screen Time stuff. Not sure about other phones. I know you can permit certain apps to work normally after a certain time, and others to need confirmation you actually want to open it.

    You can definitely do that in Google's family link, the levels of permissions are pretty granular.

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    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    Fishman wrote: »
    Perrsun wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    Spent all evening looking for an app that would allow me to whitelist a sleep sounds app from a downtime period for the 10yo first phone.

    God, parental control apps are so gross and invasive. Most made my skin crawl.

    I think iOS has this in the Screen Time stuff. Not sure about other phones. I know you can permit certain apps to work normally after a certain time, and others to need confirmation you actually want to open it.

    Yeah, I think iOS might natively allows exceptions to timed app blocking. Unfortunately I'm using the Android ecosystem, which doesn't seem to allow these things easily.
    I'm trying out a few productivity apps to see if they do what I want.

    Thanks anyway.

    I use StayOff or "Floating App Timer" depending on how the App Store decides to display the app to you. It does what it says on the tin and seems minimally intrusive. I got it from one of those "10 best yadayadas", but this one was actually still freely available at time of recording.

    So I have the tablet set up that it's essentially a brick between the hours of 10 and 6, it just blocks access to every app. I can set up more detailed restrictions and set time restrictions if daily use becomes an issue. With Little King's age this stuff is still pretty straightforward because it is 100% an entertainment system, there's no social life or homework that takes place there.

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    m!ttensm!ttens he/himRegistered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    Masha and The Bear is one of the very, very few shows that we blocked from our kids' Netflix profile so they couldn't watch it anymore , I think it was that and this French animated show about grubs that didn't have dialog and was both gross and pointless. I really don't like it.

    The Nickelodeon school of incredibly rigid structure and repetition (Dora, Blaze, et al) mostly drove me a little crazy but somehow Octonauts was ok, those little guys made me laugh and the creature report song never got old.

    Wait you can block shit from Netflix please teach me your ways.

    You have to do it through your web browser, you can't do it in the app, but it rules, whatever you block just disappears from their Netflix like it was never there. This video isn't the most professional but it's short and to the point without much YouTube nonsense.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=Bq099sjBHZA

    Cocomelon disappeared from our TV and I have absolutely no idea where it went, sorry. Yes, it is weird it's still on TV at your grandmother's house. 🙃

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    ThroThro pgroome@penny-arcade.com Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    French animated show about grubs that didn't have dialog and was both gross and pointless. I really don't like it.
    Larva, it was Korean. It was terrible, disgusting, and actively harmful for humans to watch. It's the show that made me learn how to block shows on Netflix.

    Also I kinda group good kid shows into two categories:
    1) Adults and kids like (or at least tolerate) it, so we can watch together.
    2) It's a good show for kids but I'm not going to watch it with them. There's plenty of educational to education adjacent shows with well presented ideas for kids that are mildly annoying to me, but I have no problem if my kids watch.

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    #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    Bean's preschool class had their school photos last week and Y'ALL... LOOK AT MY KID
    m9dz1rn8ovjd.jpg

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    lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava ~~She/Her~~ Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Oh my very goodies.


    What an amazing amazing photo.

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    MNC DoverMNC Dover Full-time Voice Actor Kirkland, WARegistered User regular
    0b19jbat2qtr.png

    Need a voice actor? Hire me at bengrayVO.com
    Legends of Runeterra: MNCdover #moc
    Switch ID: MNC Dover SW-1154-3107-1051
    Steam ID
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    m!ttensm!ttens he/himRegistered User regular
    Somewhat related which brings up a question I asked myself the other day: what age is a good age to introduce Star Wars to kids? My daughter (age 4) has a "baby yoda" stuffed animal and matching pajamas she loves that her grandparents got her, but The Mandalorian has some pretty violent themes considering the merch they market towards kids which is pretty frustrating. I think I was maybe around 6 or 7 I think when my parents really started with taking me to movies or watching movies on VHS. I probably watched our bootleg recorded copies of the original trilogy along with the Indiana Jones movies a thousand times, I know I wore out at least a couple of tapes (including the official VHS box set from the early 90s). I never really did any of the cartoons but I did devour the terrible pulpy novels throughout the 90s.

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    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Somewhat related which brings up a question I asked myself the other day: what age is a good age to introduce Star Wars to kids? My daughter (age 4) has a "baby yoda" stuffed animal and matching pajamas she loves that her grandparents got her, but The Mandalorian has some pretty violent themes considering the merch they market towards kids which is pretty frustrating. I think I was maybe around 6 or 7 I think when my parents really started with taking me to movies or watching movies on VHS. I probably watched our bootleg recorded copies of the original trilogy along with the Indiana Jones movies a thousand times, I know I wore out at least a couple of tapes (including the official VHS box set from the early 90s). I never really did any of the cartoons but I did devour the terrible pulpy novels throughout the 90s.

    My brother in Christ, you start them off with Lego Star Wars.

    There's also animated TV series that are great for ages 6 and up.

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    m!ttensm!ttens he/himRegistered User regular
    Aldo wrote: »
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Somewhat related which brings up a question I asked myself the other day: what age is a good age to introduce Star Wars to kids? My daughter (age 4) has a "baby yoda" stuffed animal and matching pajamas she loves that her grandparents got her, but The Mandalorian has some pretty violent themes considering the merch they market towards kids which is pretty frustrating. I think I was maybe around 6 or 7 I think when my parents really started with taking me to movies or watching movies on VHS. I probably watched our bootleg recorded copies of the original trilogy along with the Indiana Jones movies a thousand times, I know I wore out at least a couple of tapes (including the official VHS box set from the early 90s). I never really did any of the cartoons but I did devour the terrible pulpy novels throughout the 90s.

    My brother in Christ, you start them off with Lego Star Wars.

    There's also animated TV series that are great for ages 6 and up.

    I thought about that (and even originally had it in my post) but 1) she hasn't expressed any real interest in video games outside of Just Dance on our Switch and 2) I thought the plot would get lost in all the running around and breaking/collecting stuff. Maybe if she expresses interest and we have a free weekend with nothing on the schedule (lol as if that ever happens).

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    Kane Red RobeKane Red Robe Master of Magic ArcanusRegistered User regular
    Psst, there's Lego Star Wars cartoons

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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    I waited until my older kid was 10 to show her the live action Star Wars movies (starting with A New Hope, obviously) because that's what my parents did to me and now it's tradition dammit.

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    MuzzmuzzMuzzmuzz Registered User regular
    Made the mistake of going easy on the first round of connect 4 with my kid.

    Because I would have at least been 1-4 win:loss.

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    MulysaSemproniusMulysaSempronius but also susie nyRegistered User regular
    Just watched Ep4 the other night with my kids. I think it was the first time watching it all the way through for both of them (ages 7 and 9)
    The 7yo went in not really knowing anything and liked it. Only issues he had were the more tense moments- we had to spoil the fact that they were not going to get crushed to death in the trash compactor in order for him to not want to turn it off.
    9yo has had enough cultural osmosis to already know who Darth Vader "is", and spent about half the movie trying to let us know that she knew, while I tried to keep it a secret from 7yo.

    If that's all there is my friends, then let's keep dancing
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    Banzai5150Banzai5150 Registered User regular
    Kate doesn’t like Star Wars. I’ve failed. Her brother on the other hand loves it so I think her disdain for it is just to spite him. Anyway she’s only 7 and I figure she’ll come around eventually.

    50433.png?1708759015
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    CroakerBCCroakerBC TorontoRegistered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    Somewhat related which brings up a question I asked myself the other day: what age is a good age to introduce Star Wars to kids? My daughter (age 4) has a "baby yoda" stuffed animal and matching pajamas she loves that her grandparents got her, but The Mandalorian has some pretty violent themes considering the merch they market towards kids which is pretty frustrating. I think I was maybe around 6 or 7 I think when my parents really started with taking me to movies or watching movies on VHS. I probably watched our bootleg recorded copies of the original trilogy along with the Indiana Jones movies a thousand times, I know I wore out at least a couple of tapes (including the official VHS box set from the early 90s). I never really did any of the cartoons but I did devour the terrible pulpy novels throughout the 90s.

    Our two year old has a great time with the Clone Wars cartoon ("See Yoda!") and Bad Batch, which he usually "watches" in the background while building blocks or pushing cars around. Lego Star Wars, on the other hand, is serious business met with rapt attention ("Look Daddy, look! Darth Vader!").
    We tried him on the films, and he casually ignored IV and V and I and II, but was utterly absorbed in RotJ.

    He absolutely loves that first Tales of the Jedi episode too, possibly because it has a baby in it ("Watch baby oka, daddy?" Again?").

    He'll probably hate them when he's older.

    The short answer is "it depends on your kid". I'd probably stick to the first two prequels and the original trilogy of films though, they're fairly safe. And maybe skip the live action shows.

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    SporkAndrewSporkAndrew Registered User, ClubPA regular
    The LEGO Freemaker Adventures used to be a good series on Netflix but I think something must have happened with the rights because a multiple-season long thing has been reduced to a few shorts on Disney+. Either way they were / are a good starting off point as it's telling stories that are happening in parallel with the main series of films so you get things from another perspective.

    There's multiple LEGO Star Wars holiday specials at this point - a Summer Holiday one and the Life Day that includes the full cast from the recent trilogy. Ours loves the fact that Palpatine is now a lot less threatening and even Darth Maul with horrifying spider legs is pretty fun. Plus if you want to go full synergy the Halycon Starcruiser that they go to for the Summer Holiday special is the Galactic Starcruiser that you can pay something daft like $5000 for 3 nights at Disney World in Florida and they visit Batuu which is Star Wars: Galaxies Edge at Hollywood Studios.

    The one about the fucking space hairdresser and the cowboy. He's got a tinfoil pal and a pedal bin
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    DaMoonRulzDaMoonRulz Mare ImbriumRegistered User regular
    American Parents: Are daycare and preschool tuition tax deductible?

    3basnids3lf9.jpg




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    AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    DaMoonRulz wrote: »
    American Parents: Are daycare and preschool tuition tax deductible?

    A small portion. (because fuck you) Knocks maybe a grand off your tax bill in the end so thanks for covering part of one month.

    Oh doing worry you can use a flex spending account with pretax dollars!
    (If your employer offers it)
    (and you aren't arbitrarily classed as a high earning employee so you only get $500 to put into the account)

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
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    MulysaSemproniusMulysaSempronius but also susie nyRegistered User regular
    DaMoonRulz wrote: »
    American Parents: Are daycare and preschool tuition tax deductible?

    To a degree, yeah. I think the limit, last time I did this, was $3k a year. Which is.. yeah. You need the tax ID of the place offering care. Most tax software has an easy-to-fill section for this.

    You can also, for this year, set up an Dependent Care FSA. I never did, because I did the math one year, and the extra hassle wasn't worth it (to me). But some employers have extra they give for those, and they are technically better than the tax break.

    But, overall, the amount is very small and kind of an insult when you think about it too much.

    If that's all there is my friends, then let's keep dancing
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    DaMoonRulzDaMoonRulz Mare ImbriumRegistered User regular
    Is there a minimum to qualify for it?

    Because I work weekends I have Thur/Fri off and my wife has Mon morning off until I get home from work and my parents watch her on Wednesdays so we're very fortunate to be in a position where Athena only goes one day a week for $35.

    It's a lady doing it out of her house with a handful of kids; are we getting black market child care, or would she likely have a tax ID?

    3basnids3lf9.jpg




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    MulysaSemproniusMulysaSempronius but also susie nyRegistered User regular
    oh man, going down the rabbit hole I found https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc602
    Care Providers

    You must identify all persons or organizations that provide care for your child or dependent. You must report the name, address, and TIN (either the social security number or the employer identification number) of the care provider on your return. If the care provider is a tax-exempt organization, you need only report the name and address of the organization on your return. You can use Form W-10, Dependent Care Provider's Identification and Certification to request this information from the care provider. If you can't provide information regarding the care provider, you may still be eligible for the credit if you can show that you exercised due diligence in attempting to provide the required information. If you pay a provider to care for your dependent or spouse in your home, you may be a household employer. If you're a household employer, you may have to withhold and pay social security and Medicare taxes and pay federal unemployment tax. For more information, refer to Do You Have Household Employees? in Publication 503, Publication 926, Household Employer's Tax Guide, or Topic No. 756.

    Payments to Relatives or Dependents - The care provider can't be your spouse, the parent of your qualifying individual if your qualifying individual is your child and under age 13, your child who is under the age of 19, or a dependent whom you or your spouse may claim on your return.

    If that's all there is my friends, then let's keep dancing
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    m!ttensm!ttens he/himRegistered User regular
    edited February 2023
    DaMoonRulz wrote: »
    Is there a minimum to qualify for it?

    Because I work weekends I have Thur/Fri off and my wife has Mon morning off until I get home from work and my parents watch her on Wednesdays so we're very fortunate to be in a position where Athena only goes one day a week for $35.

    It's a lady doing it out of her house with a handful of kids; are we getting black market child care, or would she likely have a tax ID?

    I was just reading the instructions for the worksheet about this yesterday. If you're getting child care from a person who is not a family member and paying them (for family the rules are a little different and I skipped that section) you either put in their tax ID number or their SSN if they don't have a registered business name. They should be paying tax on what you're paying them but it isn't your problem if they aren't (until they lose their business and you're out child care).

    edit: I think our child care is pulled pre-tax from my wife's paycheck (it's a not-for-profit daycare for employee children run by the hospital she works for) so I probably don't qualify, but I need to double check her w-2 to make sure that's how it's structured.

    m!ttens on
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    honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    My three year old is better at snapping her fingers than I am.

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