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[Tabletop Roleplaying]: Anyway Nazi punks fuck off

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  • The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    It is always fascinating seeing these old game designs and just how arbitrary and weird they are

    Like I still don't really get the hangups D&D has around psionics, but this is just a whole nother level of wow, what the hell

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    I wonder if I can find ‘Sword World’, the legally distinct Japanese roleplaying game the Lodoss crew published when they couldn’t get the rights to make their setting for D&D. Might have smoothed some things out, might have been just as weird.

  • NeveronNeveron HellValleySkyTree SwedenRegistered User regular
    Tox wrote: »
    Wait what's the fighter's XP progression? Is it not also 2k like the Bard?

    If you look at the Bard's XP table I posted up above, it's not terribly different from the Fighter's. You'll notice how going up in levels takes 2K, 4K, 8K, 16K etc. etc. experience, meaning that each one requires you to roughly double your current experience - which isn't necessarily an issue, since monster experience and the amount of treasure also tends to increase somewhat. It then flattens out at "name level", which in Bard's case means that after level 11 each level is a flat 200K experience.
    So the busted Fighter 7/Thief 9/Bard 11 spent 70,001 experience as a Fighter, 110,001 as a Thief, and then 150,001 as a Bard for 380K total. A straight Fighter would reach level 9 at 250,001 and level 10 at 500,001.

    It's not a terribly idea for a level progression, since it means that if someone's character dies and has to be replaced with a level 1 character (because they didn't have any hirelings of note or whatever) then their new character will catch up to the rest of the party before they next level up without the DM having to keep track of funky level-up schemes or whatever - in fact, since in AD&D treasure XP goes to the person the players decide gets that amount of the treasure, a higher-level party can just go to dangerous places and funnel 4000 gold worth of treasure to a first-level character and instantly pop them up to the cusp of level 3! If you've ever heard of absurd "farming runs" in AD&D, this is the kind of rule that led to those situations

    The newer editions usually just handle this with "you start at the same level you left off", but that can get a bit funky when, say, the Thief reaches name level at 220K-ish experience with +200K/level thereafter and the Magic-User reaches name level at 375K with +375K/level thereafter. (An 18th-level Wizard capable of casting ninth-level spells is at the amount of experience, three million, as a level 22 Thief.)
    It's also something that's difficult to backport to the old design philosophy of "you start as a weakling that dies to a stray gust of wind, but in exchange you get super strong later" if you can just start as a character that's strong in the early game and then replace yourself with a new high-level Super-Wizard or whatever.
    These aren't typically issues in newer games since, well, they care more about every class being basically the same at every level in terms of power level or whatever, but yeah.

    (Also worth keeping in mind is that the creators of D&D often played in a single setting that had twenty-something players playing on-and-off adventuring for an evening as a party of four or whatever. Ending up with mismatched parties is kind of just the norm in that case, since while Alice might show up three times a week to adventure with her Fighter it's possible that Bob just shows up every other thursday.)

    ElvenshaeDracomicron
  • admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    One day I'm finally gonna break down and run a gold=xp game and not a single person will have fun.

    DarkPrimusTynnanElvenshaeFencingsaxJragghenZonugalSleepDisruptedCapitalistIncenjucarWhelkironsizideUndead ScottsmanHappy Little MachineIloveslimes
  • The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    admanb wrote: »
    One day I'm finally gonna break down and run a gold=xp game and not a single person will have fun.

    I can confirm that having played a video game that implemented a form of this, it was awful.

    Okay, so it's not the same thing at all, but it really was fucking awful. especially in a MOBA.

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    edited February 2023
    I’m finding pieces of Sword World fairly easily, but I’m unsure if I’ve found a full translation as yet. Early insights:
    - Halflings were changed to “grass-runners”, which is a significantly cooler name. Innately talk to plants.
    - Only dwarfs can see in the dark.
    - Uses 2d6! Nice to know as soon as anyone looks at roleplaying they’re like… hmm what if our game used dice you can take out of a regular board game you might already have? Plus it’ll give consistent results.
    - Artwork way better than what anyone else had at the time.
    - Has “Runefolk”, which are golems. This may be 2nd edition only.
    - Has an interesting take on rolling for stats. Each race has varying amounts of dice to roll for stats, dwarfs get 2d6+6 to roll for Manual Dexterity while elves only get 1d6 for Strength.
    - There is a separate campaign setting book out there narrated by a witch, just throwing that out there as I continue. Apparently this came first.
    - Dang! If you roll 1-1 you get 50 XP. They fail forward in Sword World.
    - Race does limit class. Dwarfs can’t be sorcerers etc.
    - Very simple combat? Maybe even less complex than early D&D? I think it’s some kind of back line/front line—Think Ogre Battle, if you played that on the SNES.

    There’s a lot to love by the look of it, and turns out no, actually, original D&D didn’t have to be messed up.

    Edit: Not an endorsement to play it, it’s still obviously drawing on what they were playing previously, but I can see what they were going for.

    Endless_Serpents on
    BahamutZERORhesus PositiveHexmage-PA
  • GlaziusGlazius Registered User regular
    I wonder if I can find ‘Sword World’, the legally distinct Japanese roleplaying game the Lodoss crew published when they couldn’t get the rights to make their setting for D&D. Might have smoothed some things out, might have been just as weird.

    Hell yes, it's still being actively published, pretty much vying for the top spot in Japan with Call of Cthulhu, and is currently on its 2.5 edition.

    Can you find a version of it that's been translated into English? That's... much less likely.

  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Glazius wrote: »
    I wonder if I can find ‘Sword World’, the legally distinct Japanese roleplaying game the Lodoss crew published when they couldn’t get the rights to make their setting for D&D. Might have smoothed some things out, might have been just as weird.

    Hell yes, it's still being actively published, pretty much vying for the top spot in Japan with Call of Cthulhu, and is currently on its 2.5 edition.

    Can you find a version of it that's been translated into English? That's... much less likely.

    I haven’t been able to find an entire translated copy in the passed 3 minutes, but I’ve actually found more than you’d think! I bet I could piece it together by tomorrow evening.


  • NeveronNeveron HellValleySkyTree SwedenRegistered User regular
    admanb wrote: »
    One day I'm finally gonna break down and run a gold=xp game and not a single person will have fun.

    If you really want to run one for some reason, I'd recommend just simplifying it down to "sacks of coins" or whatever.
    • Each character can carry three sacks (one backpack, one in each hand). If you're lugging a sack about in a hand, you're not holding anything else there - no sword, no shield, no torch.
    • Miscellaneous equipment is "weightless".
    • A person weighs enough that you can't carry anything else.
    • Armor doesn't impact carrying capacity, only speed. Assume competence and strong arm muscles.
    • Each sack you bring out of the dungeon gives you 300/30/3 experience depending on if it's filled with gold, silver, or copper.
    • Dropping a sack of coins will distract intelligent monsters even if it's secretly just worthless copper.
    • Gems are "weightless" and worth, like, 100 gold each; jewelry the same but 3000 gold.
    • Magic items have inherent value in being useful, trash and furniture isn't worth the time it would take to bring it out of the dungeon.
    • Monsters are worth like 100XP/level, split evenly among the party.
    • Treasure (and the experience from it) is split among the party however the players want it split, let them figure it out themselves.
    That would... probably catch most of the main points of appeal, I think?

    If you want to be fiddly with coin amounts, just assume that players don't count them until they're back in safety at which point you roll something like 200+2d100 to figure out how many coins were actually in that bag.

    ...God, I should really get around to writing my mostly-statless OD&D retroclone at some point, huh.

  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    I don't like keeping track of XP or Gold, haha

    ElvenshaeRhesus PositiveFencingsaxWhelk
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    The greatest gem of all is the milestone.

    Rhesus PositivetzeentchlingCruorironsizide
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Look at this stuff.

    xzdwhkdciwum.jpeg
    ezxa8a5nmf7x.jpeg

    This artwork comes before an appendix.

    BahamutZERODracomicronasofyeunFencingsaxZonugaltzeentchlingDepressperadoCruorIncenjucarDuke 2.0WhelkGR_ZombieA Kobold's KoboldironsizideKristmas KthulhuUndead ScottsmanIanatorHappy Little MachineIloveslimes
  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    What about a game inspired by games that use money as XP?

    Presenting a masterpiece by Grant Howitt:

    zcejh8tslxfi.jpg

    mrpakuEndless_SerpentsMaddocElvenshaeThawmusGlalWhelkironsizideKristmas KthulhuIanatorHappy Little MachineIloveslimes
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    edited February 2023
    I want @mrpaku to know I’ve had this printed out for months and it’s how I’m running the NPCs for The Vastness Beyond.

    Endless_Serpents on
    TynnanMaddocBahamutZEROmrpakuThawmustzeentchlingGlalWhelkironsizideKristmas Kthulhu
  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    …mm

  • MatevMatev Cero Miedo Registered User regular
    A bit late to the party, but Sersa Victory released Victory Basic this last winter and I feel like it captures the dungeon crawling experience without getting into the dumb stuff people don't like, while keeping the dumb stuff that makes dungeon crawling fun.

    "Go down, kick ass, and set yourselves up as gods, that's our Prime Directive!"
    Hail Hydra
  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
  • DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator, Administrator admin
    I think any intensive system stuff can be good if used properly, like...I don't want to use carry capacity, because that shit's annoying in a standard game of D&D, but if you're running one where keeping track of that becomes a focus point of the game and story in order to set a tone? I'm sure it works.

    Dimension 20's Starstruck Odyssey really sticks out to me as an example of a game using mechanics I normally don't care for and using them to really drive the plot and characters, while also establishing a tone. The game starts with them getting their shit wrecked in a shitty starship run by an incompetent captain, and over the course of the campaign they have to take on increasingly risky jobs to just keep everything afloat. They had to keep track of, like...ammo and grenades, and pay to repair the ship...all of that is stuff I generally wouldn't want to touch. By making it a focus of what they were doing, it added a bit of fun stress to the proceedings and really sold me on the idea of playing a game where that stuff is relevant

    ElvenshaeMagellwebguy20SleepMatevFencingsaxDuke 2.0Kristmas Kthulhu
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    edited February 2023
    Wasn’t the topic, folks were telling us about Elf level 3/H or whatever that Lovecraftian stuff was.



    In Wreckage, a game that I will never format well enough to publish, items have associated Tetris blocks you have to fit on a small grid, because it’s fun. Guns are usually L shaped. Consumables are little one square pips. You can stick something one square out of your grid, but each time you do you become more off-balance.

    For more in-depth looks at my design philosophy, keep coming to this thread.

    Endless_Serpents on
    GR_Zombie
  • DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator, Administrator admin
    this is an off-topic forum!!!!

    Kristmas Kthulhu
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    You’re right!

    eycv4yachjbs.jpeg

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  • admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    DJ Eebs wrote: »
    I think any intensive system stuff can be good if used properly, like...I don't want to use carry capacity, because that shit's annoying in a standard game of D&D, but if you're running one where keeping track of that becomes a focus point of the game and story in order to set a tone? I'm sure it works.

    Dimension 20's Starstruck Odyssey really sticks out to me as an example of a game using mechanics I normally don't care for and using them to really drive the plot and characters, while also establishing a tone. The game starts with them getting their shit wrecked in a shitty starship run by an incompetent captain, and over the course of the campaign they have to take on increasingly risky jobs to just keep everything afloat. They had to keep track of, like...ammo and grenades, and pay to repair the ship...all of that is stuff I generally wouldn't want to touch. By making it a focus of what they were doing, it added a bit of fun stress to the proceedings and really sold me on the idea of playing a game where that stuff is relevant

    It was unfortunately GMed by Adam Koebel, but Swan Song is still the best long-form Actual Play I've ever watched (Dimension 20's shows are all, mercifully, contained to far more manageable lengths) and played out very similarly. Scrimping for cash on its own isn't interesting, but the need to make money coming into conflict with other needs is very relatable, it turns out, and can result in players making difficult and dramatic decisions in what are relatively low-stakes scenarios.

    SleepFencingsax
  • LabelLabel Registered User regular
    Did that Taskmaster-esque RPG scenario get played? How did it go?

  • DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator, Administrator admin
    It hasn't yet, because all of us are very busy! Hopefully soon, though.

    LabelRhesus PositiveElvenshaeMatevFencingsax
  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    edited February 2023
    I've brought it up before but my personal fantasy for gold=XP is one where the XP only manifests when you spend gold on stuff most players won't.

    Because the issue with XP in traditional games is that it's boring and vaguely doled out till you hit the milestone. So just do milestones! (Or smaller XP with narrative triggers, as story games tend towards).

    The issue with gold is that it's only a meaningful restraint for the first bit unless you're really pedantic and boring about where it gets spent. So lots of games just abstract gold into large chunks or even just do a 'fuck it basic gear is free' base level of heroic economics.

    You can fix both of those by making it so spending gold on cool, evocative things is your XP:

    Suddenly players wanna fund big feasts in their honour, pay to repair the damage to the chapel incurred when they cast the demon out. The hard to model but vitally human ways people can spend money which aren't on their character sheets now become necessary progression for said character sheet as much as spending three hundred bucks on platemail or repairing/replenishing your gear and consumables is.

    Albino Bunny on
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  • DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    I had a hard time sleeping again; the upside of chronic pain and nausea is that I sometimes get some good RPG Thinkin' done while I wait for daytime or sleep.

    This time I thought of the introductory adventure for Wasteland Degenerates, called Reaver's Rhapsody.

    It starts with a badass biker lady named Tunguska who needs the PCs to find the Gas King's daughter (also a badass). Tunguska takes the PCs to a junkyard where they can each roll on the salvage table and her fucked up little mechanic will put together a wasteland hot rod to make the 100 mile drive to the scion's last known coordinates.

    And that's all I have for now. Any progress is good progress.

    Endless_SerpentsCruortzeentchlingCalicaMatevFencingsaxKristmas Kthulhu
  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    I had a hard time sleeping again; the upside of chronic pain and nausea is that I sometimes get some good RPG Thinkin' done while I wait for daytime or sleep.

    This time I thought of the introductory adventure for Wasteland Degenerates, called Reaver's Rhapsody.

    It starts with a badass biker lady named Tunguska who needs the PCs to find the Gas King's daughter (also a badass). Tunguska takes the PCs to a junkyard where they can each roll on the salvage table and her fucked up little mechanic will put together a wasteland hot rod to make the 100 mile drive to the scion's last known coordinates.

    And that's all I have for now. Any progress is good progress.

    As an intro adventure it feels like you could have a stat check or whatever the system uses to determine how many rolls you get on the salvage table.

    That way you teach players how the rolls work in the system in a stress free environment. While also giving some of them agency in what cool hot rod they drive to the adventure.

    Endless_SerpentsFencingsaxKristmas Kthulhu
  • Indie WinterIndie Winter die Krähe Rudi Hurzlmeier (German, b. 1952)Registered User regular
    edited February 2023
    I've brought it up before but my personal fantasy for gold=XP is one where the XP only manifests when you spend gold on stuff most players won't.

    Because the issue with XP in traditional games is that it's boring and vaguely doled out till you hit the milestone. So just do milestones! (Or smaller XP with narrative triggers, as story games tend towards).

    The issue with gold is that it's only a meaningful restraint for the first bit unless you're really pedantic and boring about where it gets spent. So lots of games just abstract gold into large chunks or even just do a 'fuck it basic gear is free' base level of heroic economics.

    You can fix both of those by making it so spending gold on cool, evocative things is your XP:

    Suddenly players wanna fund big feasts in their honour, pay to repair the damage to the chapel incurred when they cast the demon out. The hard to model but vitally human ways people can spend money which aren't on their character sheets now become necessary progression for said character sheet as much as spending three hundred bucks on platemail or repairing/replenishing your gear and consumables is.

    and also, if your group is into that sort of thing, gold=xp makes encumbrance an important issue again

    do you go further into the dungeon heavy with the weight of looted treasure or do you call it quits on "this run" to level up on the surface and continue another day?

    make every dungeon crawl into a persona dungeon - you can come back tomorrow but then you'll miss out on the big parade in town, etc.

    Indie Winter on
    wY6K6Jb.gif
    Matev
  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    Encumbrance is something I super like all the time.

    But also any game where it's more complicated than a 5 slot inventory and some items only take half a slot is doing it wrong.

    Endless_Serpents
  • DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    I had a hard time sleeping again; the upside of chronic pain and nausea is that I sometimes get some good RPG Thinkin' done while I wait for daytime or sleep.

    This time I thought of the introductory adventure for Wasteland Degenerates, called Reaver's Rhapsody.

    It starts with a badass biker lady named Tunguska who needs the PCs to find the Gas King's daughter (also a badass). Tunguska takes the PCs to a junkyard where they can each roll on the salvage table and her fucked up little mechanic will put together a wasteland hot rod to make the 100 mile drive to the scion's last known coordinates.

    And that's all I have for now. Any progress is good progress.

    As an intro adventure it feels like you could have a stat check or whatever the system uses to determine how many rolls you get on the salvage table.

    That way you teach players how the rolls work in the system in a stress free environment. While also giving some of them agency in what cool hot rod they drive to the adventure.

    That's a good idea!

    However, this is a Mörk Borg, so the salvage table can kill you.

    I'll make the extra rolls optional.

    GR_Zombie
  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    I had a friend tell me of an L5R game he ran where a player didn't spend any XP. Just kept saving it up. Then in one session spent it all mid combat for a super Saiyan moment.

    Endless_SerpentsRhesus PositiveElvenshaeNeveronmrpakuIndie WintertzeentchlingadmanbCalicaJragghenMatevFencingsaxWhelkMegaMan001Kristmas Kthulhu
  • NeveronNeveron HellValleySkyTree SwedenRegistered User regular
    Because the issue with XP in traditional games is that it's boring and vaguely doled out till you hit the milestone. So just do milestones! (Or smaller XP with narrative triggers, as story games tend towards).

    the thing with GP=XP is that, generally speaking, the systems that advocate for it often aren't systems where milestones are... a thing?

    like, they're all about that freeform sandbox stuff where the players just get to do whatever and maybe don't ever actually achieve anything of narrative worth
    lots of on-the-fly adventuring and lots of adventures where the end is just "congratulations! you found the big treasure at the end of the dungeon"

    (there's plenty of people who run plot-heavy games in OSR systems, don't get me wrong, I just think the systems tend to be ill-suited for planned long-term character-focused stories what with the relatively high character mortality and thus PC turnover rate)
    (I definitely think that XP makes more sense in easy-to-grok single- or double-digit amounts than the hundreds of thousands D&D eventually tends towards, though - Fabula Ultima has each level be ten XP, and that feels pretty decent)

  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    I mean, finishing a dungeon, beating a big monster or getting some notable treasure are all things you can milestone around.

    As is just 'Well three sessions, feels like a level up'.

    ElvenshaeMagellRhesus PositiveFencingsax
  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    3.5, and by extension Pathfinder, killed the magic of magical items.

    Because magical items are such an expected part of your "stat block" and in many cases your holistic "build", it is roughly expected by the system that you will have access to most magic items you might want at their given price.

    So you're left with two options, one is you get the money "equivalent" of stuff from your GM via loot, which they give you tailor fit to what you want or need. The other is they give you gold or the equivalent, and you go to Fantasy Costco.

    I think that's why, generally speaking, I don't even like to bother tracking money. Money is boring! In my mind, your party just has a vague "state" of financial safety, like dots in WoD resources or something. Go to an inn? Yeah whatever you can afford it unless there's Plot Reasons you can't.

    DelzhandFencingsax
  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    For most games yeah, there's not really much value past letting players have X wealth level which implies Y about fiction and financial reach/state.

    Then in games which do track it there's usually a better way to do finance than just raw Cash On Hand. Like Blades where Cash is an abstracted lump sum and lets you buy extra downtime actions or stash away for retirement.

    The main game I can think of where having hyper granular cash is Red Markets and uh, money is literally the core mechanic that all things go back to in that game.

  • NeveronNeveron HellValleySkyTree SwedenRegistered User regular
    Maddoc wrote: »
    3.5, and by extension Pathfinder, killed the magic of magical items.

    Because magical items are such an expected part of your "stat block" and in many cases your holistic "build", it is roughly expected by the system that you will have access to most magic items you might want at their given price.

    So you're left with two options, one is you get the money "equivalent" of stuff from your GM via loot, which they give you tailor fit to what you want or need. The other is they give you gold or the equivalent, and you go to Fantasy Costco.

    I think that's why, generally speaking, I don't even like to bother tracking money. Money is boring! In my mind, your party just has a vague "state" of financial safety, like dots in WoD resources or something. Go to an inn? Yeah whatever you can afford it unless there's Plot Reasons you can't.

    the other issue that arised here was that, well, magic items were now meant to be balanced and level-appropriate

    In a modern game, you won't get any level 1 magic-users who somehow managed to luck into a Staff of Power - that's no longer on the generic "III.D. Rods, Staves, & Wands" table, the Staff of Power is on the Encounter Level 10+ Major Magical Item table or is a level 19+ item (with a pretty boring "1/day on a crit your daily or encounter power isn't expended" ability, tbh) or has been banished to the mostly level 11+ Magic Item Table H.
    The Staff of the Magi, meanwhile, went from on the same 1% III.D. table to being a only-by-DM-fiat artifact in 3E, to not even being in 4E as far as I can tell, and then finally a Legendary magic item on the even-rarer-than-H Magic Item Table I.

    Being a low-level character and somehow finding Excalibur is exciting - being a low-level character and finding a +1 sword is just expected. And you don't even need to go that far, either! A Wand of Fireballs or giant-slaying sword could be just as exciting if it even feels like "this really isn't something I should have yet". Or, hell, the laser rifles from Barrier Peaks. If it's got some kind of batteries or non-rechargeable charges then you can kind of just push it as far as you want, because it isn't staying around forever!


    Another issue you get with the players-buy-the-item systems is that, well, there's a lot of items that just fall by the wayside. They'll go for the most generically useful stuff, so any niche Magic Ring of Transform-into-a-Toad or whatever will get completely passed over - but if they instead found a Magic Ring of Turn-into-a-Toad, the players will find a way to use it.
    This also means that the most generically useful items are just incredibly boring. Portable holes, Bags of Holding, Gauntlets of Ogre Power, +2 warhammers, just complete and utter snoozefests.

  • DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    In Mörk Borg games, your character is expected to be such a miserable fuck that granular tracking of their silver is necessary because that's how you know if they starve to death because they couldn't afford food.

    Which is why in Wasteland Degenerates I'm cutting out the middleman and just making food money.

    mrpakuThawmusNeveronCruorRhesus PositiveMatevWhelkKristmas Kthulhu
  • Indie WinterIndie Winter die Krähe Rudi Hurzlmeier (German, b. 1952)Registered User regular
    Tomanta wrote: »
    I had a friend tell me of an L5R game he ran where a player didn't spend any XP. Just kept saving it up. Then in one session spent it all mid combat for a super Saiyan moment.

    Wait, how does that work? Does the system incorporates mid-battle levelling as a design possibility or did the GM just allow it per rule of cool

    wY6K6Jb.gif
  • The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Eternal Hungry Corpse Registered User regular
    Wrote a little drabble, you can use it for an NPC or something if you want

    --

    Sanglier is fat with strength, shaggy haired and long tusked. His bones are older than the land he sleeps on, and his flesh is creased like old bark.

    He is not a man. He is not a beast. He is both, he is neither, and he brooks no trespass in the lands of his people.

    He moves with wild hooved power, a rolling boulder of muscle. Here he is a mountain-shoulder boar, unstoppable in motion. Here he is an ancient oak of a man, deep rooted and immoveable. There he is both and neither at the same time, the paradox rendered in perfected flesh.

    To pass safely, do him honor. Show care to his lands and people both. Do not answer his riddle, but understand it instead. Fight him with all of your might, or share with him your food and wisdom.

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them
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  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited February 2023
    Tomanta wrote: »
    I had a friend tell me of an L5R game he ran where a player didn't spend any XP. Just kept saving it up. Then in one session spent it all mid combat for a super Saiyan moment.

    Wait, how does that work? Does the system incorporates mid-battle levelling as a design possibility or did the GM just allow it per rule of cool

    It's not a level based system (was L5R 3rd edition). XP is spent independently to increase skills/attributes/get "feats". IIRC, there's no training time requirements in rules as written (but is implied). So it's just "I'm spending 90 XP to increase my Fire ring by 2 and another 30 to increase my sword skill, now I keep twice as many dice when I roll."

    There's also a rule of cool component, of course.

    Tomanta on
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