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My stomach is retarded

Silicon DioxideSilicon Dioxide Registered User regular
edited July 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
When I am in any situation that could cause stress, my stomach gets really retarded. It like clenches up, I get nausea, and I usually can't eat. Now, I don't consider myself a very stressed out person, but my stomach appears to disagree. I can understand how I'd get sick from a really important situation, like taking the SAT or something, but my stomach acts up for the most trivial things. For example, I get a call from my girlfriend, and suddenly I feel sick and I have to throw up. That doesn't even make sense; I've talked on the phone with my girlfriend tons of times without getting nauseous.

Basically, most social situation that involve eating pose a problem to me, which sucks because obviously people love to eat out. I usually get nauseous and have to excuse myself to the restroom to eat. Sometimes I can eat with people (depends on the situation), but the majority of the time, no. The only time where I can really eat normally is when I'm in a completely Zen relaxed state with no responsibilities, like on a weekend or during the summer where I'm not hanging out with my friends or girlfriend and just chilling at home playing video games or whatever.

I've been to an intestinal doctor, who did endoscopy, ultrasound, and CT or MRI, I don't remember which. They found nothing. Then I went to a psychologist, who was mostly useless. So now I turn to you, internet. What do I do?

Silicon Dioxide on

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    NekroNekro Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Holy shit I've been dealing with this same problem since I was 5 and a half years old. Been to hundreds of doctors with inconclusive results. My stomach goes crazy sometimes while I'm eating, sometimes after, sometimes from not eating, and any time I am about to do anything. What I've found to work is to take Aloe Vera gel caps before you eat or if your stomach goes nuts. It works in like 20 minutes, and has basically become my home-diagnosed treatment, after all the tests and medicines failed.

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    blue integerblue integer Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I can empathize with your issue. I've dealt with emetophobia (fear of vomiting) for a few years now, although I never really throw up. Like you, though, the problem often inhibits my social interactions (ie eating out, driving, ect).

    Do you fear or dread the queasy situations before they happen? Could the problem be that your problem is stressing you out? Or maybe a hidden anxiety of social interaction?

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    Silicon DioxideSilicon Dioxide Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I can empathize with your issue. I've dealt with emetophobia (fear of vomiting) for a few years now, although I never really throw up. Like you, though, the problem often inhibits my social interactions (ie eating out, driving, ect).

    Do you fear or dread the queasy situations before they happen? Could the problem be that your problem is stressing you out? Or maybe a hidden anxiety of social interaction?

    I definitely fear the nausea. If there's a situation where I think it will happen, i'll probably be more nervous and the prophecy will fulfill itself, etc. I don't think I'm afraid of social interaction. I mean, I don't mind interacting with people. But apparently my stomach does.

    Silicon Dioxide on
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    IreneDAdlerIreneDAdler Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I've never dealt with this, but I saw this guy on the Colbert Report who wrote a book that might be able to shed some light on this situation: The Second Brain.

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    cooljammer00cooljammer00 Hey Small Christmas-Man!Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    i guess you could hang out with your friends in a situation in which you vomiting would be seen as sort of ok.

    and then work your way up from there? maybe if you went drinking or something, but not to an ill extent.

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    Silicon DioxideSilicon Dioxide Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I can hang out with my friends fine, usually, if we're doing something like playing pool or just at someone's house. The problem arises when food is involved. Also, we don't drink.

    The book sounds interesting, but the first review says "This is not a book for anyone who has a digestive problem who wants a cure".

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    CryogenCryogen Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I get something like this. I've had it since i was about 10, and am now 30. In that time i've never officially had whatever i get diagnosed, i've also had gastroscopies and all sorts of scans, and spoken to psychologists, once when i was about 18 and again last year, trying to figure it out. I've tried a variety of medications, none of which really work. The difference is that mine only hits once every 3 or 4 months, but it ends up with me vomiting for 12+ hours straight (which isnt fun) then basically leaves me physically exhausted for a further day or two (understandably!).

    One of the better things i've tried was to drink a cup of lemon & ginger tea if i started to feel it coming. This has had mixed success, which is still better than the no success of anything else i've tried.

    The last time i had it, strangely it didnt end in vomiting. However, it did make me hyperventilate to the point where i seriously thought i was going to die (my muscles were tightened to paralysis) and an ambulance was called. The paramedics said i was having a panic attack (at the hospital it was later also referred to as an anxiety attack). They also said i wouldnt have died, but i might have passed out, which then would have calmed me down anyway and i'd be fine. I found this funny at the time :)

    Since then, i havent had any problems, though its only been about 5 months ago now. But i havent even felt close to an attack, and i've been in numerous situations i previously tried to avoid because they'd normally be a trigger (such as going out to restaurants or parties, visiting unfamiliar houses) and i've never felt even a twinge of the problem.

    My theory on my own thing is that it is psychological (which i've suspected for a while) and gaining an understanding as to what is happening so far seems to have helped me. The psychologists i saw previously had always spent too much time focusing on the physical reaction i think (which is odd... and slightly annoying in hindsight) and if i were to have a repeat attack the first thing i'd be doing is seeing another psychologist to approach this from the panic angle.

    Your story is a little different than mine, but i saw enough common points that hopefully my experience may help in some way.

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    seasleepyseasleepy Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Are you okay with drinking around people? (Like, soda or whatever.) If that's the case, I'd say go with just some water, and order your meal to go when you're with friends, maybe have a roll or something if you're feeling okay, and just sip on your soda or water or whatever while you chat. If you're out with people you're not terribly close with, order and just offer that your stomach's feeling a bit wonky if people wonder why you're not eating. Maybe if you aren't anxious about it appearing weird that you're not eating, the situation will start resolving itself. Or even if it doesn't, it means you can go out with your friends to restaurants sometimes and you've got food to eat once you're on your own. Either way, it's not a big deal.
    (I don't have your nausea problem, but I do have sort of an odd timer that starts once I start eating anything. If I talk much during the meal at all, time will be up and I won't be able to finish whatever I have, whether or not I'm hungry still. So I'm used to taking home large portions of my meals when I go out with friends.)

    I don't normally have many nausea problems, but ginger does help settle my stomach on the occasion I do.

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