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Let's talk traditional games.

Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User regular
edited July 2007 in Critical Failures
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Herein we talk 'classic' games. Not board games, mind you, that's another topic entirely. Not card games, either. Again, too broad, better off on its own topic.

This is the place where we discuss Go, Chess, Backgammon, even Marbles or Jacks if you're so inclined.


To begin, I have a few questions about dominoes.

What happens when you run out of pieces to use in a particularly long round?

Also, when two sections branch off from the same side, what happens when one is about to collide with the other? This particularly has confused me, the way that double bones can create new strains. How do you control it, are there rules in place? Who is to say that I can't play a vertical double off of a vertical double? Also, at the end of the round, the winner takes the loser's hand's points divided by five. Do they have to be a multiple of five? Round up or round down?

Mahjong. Where can I find a nice set? Can anyone reccommend a good online version (no downloads is preferred but not a must) so I can get a feel for the game?

In fact, where can I buy game sets? I'd like to get a board to play Go on, but I don't know where to look.

Sigs shouldn't be higher than 80 pixels - Elki.

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Anonymous Robot on

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    INeedNoSaltINeedNoSalt with blood on my teeth Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    How does Backgammon work?

    INeedNoSalt on
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    SUPERSUGASUPERSUGA Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I love a bit of Go. A nice big board with pretty stones is definitely on my list of stuff I want in my house.

    SUPERSUGA on
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    Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    SUPERSUGA wrote: »
    I love a bit of Go. A nice big board with pretty stones is definitely on my list of stuff I want in my house.

    It is an awesome game, though I could seriously stand to work on my skills.

    Anonymous Robot on
    Sigs shouldn't be higher than 80 pixels - Elki.

    photo02-film.jpg
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    HorseshoeHorseshoe Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Cribbage, yo.

    Horseshoe on
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    Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Horseshoe wrote: »
    Cribbage, yo.

    While Cribbage is awesome, it's a card game, duder.

    Anonymous Robot on
    Sigs shouldn't be higher than 80 pixels - Elki.

    photo02-film.jpg
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    Mr_RoseMr_Rose 83 Blue Ridge Protects the Holy Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Hate to go all G&T on you guys, but 42 All-Time Classics on the DS has a whole lotta these games on it (except Go, because computers suck at Go). I'm playing Mahjong Solitaire right now...

    Mr_Rose on
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    Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Mr_Rose wrote: »
    Hate to go all G&T on you guys, but 42 All-Time Classics on the DS has a whole lotta these games on it (except Go, because computers suck at Go). I'm playing Mahjong Solitaire right now...

    Is that the UK variant of Clubhouse Games? It sounds strikingly similar. Our version had Go.

    I adore that game, it's one of my favorite DS titles, but there's still something special about playing with the cards and pieces themselves.

    Anonymous Robot on
    Sigs shouldn't be higher than 80 pixels - Elki.

    photo02-film.jpg
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    TechnicalityTechnicality Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    How does Backgammon work?

    In simple terms: You both start with a number of pieces at opposite ends of a row of spaces. You take it in turns to roll two dice, and move one piece the amount on both dice, or two pieces the amount on each dice towards your opponents end. Get all your pieces off the opponents end and you win.

    Where the game gets interesting is that if you land on an opponents piece, it goes back to the start, and you are not allowed to land on a space that has more than one opposing piece in it.

    You use these two rules to get the upper hand by forcing the opponent to waste moves, either by blocking his pieces from moving, or sending them back to the start.

    There are a few more rules, but I'm just summarising the important ones so you get an idea of how it plays.

    I think its fabulous, because it has just the right amount of random, coupled with the fact that usually the more you are winning, the less pieces you have to fight with.

    Technicality on
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    SUPERSUGASUPERSUGA Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    SUPERSUGA wrote: »
    I love a bit of Go. A nice big board with pretty stones is definitely on my list of stuff I want in my house.

    It is an awesome game, though I could seriously stand to work on my skills.
    Don't get me wrong, I'm terrible at it. It's one of those things I need to dedicate some time to. I love a game with both incredibly simple and logical mechanics and also great complexity.
    Mr_Rose wrote: »
    Hate to go all G&T on you guys, but 42 All-Time Classics on the DS has a whole lotta these games on it (except Go, because computers suck at Go). I'm playing Mahjong Solitaire right now...
    If you like traditional games then 42ATC is a must own for DS. I've got so much play out of that cart and it's a cheapo title too!

    SUPERSUGA on
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    DracilDracil Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Mmmm, Go. I play on KGS occasionally, mostly with my friend.

    I actually suck at all these deep strategy games (chess, chinese chess, go) and can never beat the computer at the easiest levels but I can do ok with people. I'm too impatient really.

    Dracil on
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    Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Tiddlywinks is my game of choice.
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    [rules spoilered for length]
    Tiddlywinks is a game for four players who play in two pairs. In singles matches each player operates two sets of coloured counters (winks) rather than one. There are 6 winks (4 small and 2 large) of each colour (blue, green, red and yellow). The game is played on a six foot by three felt mat with a pot placed in the centre. The winks are played by using a 'squidger'; this is any circular disc between 25 and 51 mm in diameter. Players use different squidgers for different shots (like selecting a club in golf). A player normally only plays a single shot in each turn, but is rewarded with an extra shot if they happen to pot a wink of their own colour. Play is time limited. Pairs matches last for 25 minutes and Singles matches last for 20 minutes, after which each colour has a further five rounds, ending with the colour that started.

    The aim of the game is to secure the highest number of table points ('tiddlies'). At the end of a normal game, three tiddlies are scored for each wink in the pot and one for each wink which remains uncovered by other winks on the mat. The player who scores most tiddlies gets four game points, the player who comes second gets two game points, and the player who comes third gets one game point. In pairs, partners add their points together. Thus there are always seven points in every game. In matches and tournaments points are usually added, so that the margin by which games are won, rather than just the number of games won, is important.

    If one player gets all their six winks into the pot they are deemed to have won by "potting out". Any winks covered are then released and two more colours must also get all their winks into the pot to distribute the seven points based on who comes first, second and third in the potting race. The partnership which potted out is rewarded by the transfer of one point from their opponents to their own score.

    Although potting out potentially provides the best score for the winners, pot-outs are rarer than might be expected. The reason is that if any wink is covered by another, the lower wink is said to be "squopped" and cannot be played. It must be rescued by another wink of that partnership. A shot which starts on the top wink of a pile may continue through underlying winks and thus squopped winks may be rescued in this way. Why are pot-outs fairly rare? The answer is simple. If a player attempting to pot out misses one shot at the pot, his wink may be captured by the opponents. If several of his winks are already in the pot, he and his partner have far fewer winks on the mat with which to fight their opponents. The chances of rescuing the squopped wink are low, and the probability that the opposition will be able to manoeuvre themselves into a winning position is high.

    Hence true winks is a game of strategy. A pair must capture and guard their opponents' winks whilst preserving their own. The basic skills of the game can be learnt in days, but the tactical knowledge of players takes years to acquire and can always be improved. Complex tactical games can develop with lots of small piles and the choice of where to attack; alternatively you may find yourself in a game in which all winks end up in a huge pile, or one of your opponents takes the calculated gamble of trying to pot out...

    Looking at the international league tables, I'm getting close to the top 50 8-)

    Rhesus Positive on
    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
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    SUPERSUGASUPERSUGA Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I see your tiddlywinks and raise you
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    SUPERSUGA on
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    Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Can anyone recommend a good online Mahjong game? Preferably free and without downloading, because my connection is very bad right now.

    Anonymous Robot on
    Sigs shouldn't be higher than 80 pixels - Elki.

    photo02-film.jpg
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    ZORRZAXXZORRZAXX Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Can anyone recommend a good online Mahjong game? Preferably free and without downloading, because my connection is very bad right now.

    In re your earlier question about an actual Mah Johnng set, I would check ebay. They have basic sets, and also a number of beautiful ivory/bamboo sets that are well worth it.

    Chess is one of those games I've never been very adept at. I like it, I just am not going to win very frequently. Same with Go. Backgammon, on the other hand, is like sweet nectar from the very teat of the Gaming Goddess.

    ZORRZAXX on
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