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Lojack for Laptops?

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Posts

  • mr_ekimmr_ekim Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    MKR wrote: »
    ArcSyn wrote: »
    MKR wrote: »
    mr_ekim wrote: »
    It's too bad this sort of implementation isn't installed directly onto the NIC (or motherboard for that matter) in the form of a small, low powered chip or even as part of the NIC's firmware.

    Lots of laptops have that. This Dell Inspiron has it. :P

    It does? I thought they just offered the software version too.

    http://www.absolute.com/products-bios-enabled-computers.asp

    Yeah, it looks like the BIOS angle has been covered. However, it's too bad that it needs to install a small app into the hard drive in order to take advantage of the network connection (which isn't compatible with Linux). I was more thinking on the lines of a totally external solution, running during the boot sequence, similar to the BOOTP software on a NIC that looks for servers to get software images from.

    mr_ekim on
    steam_sig.pngmrekim.phpmrekim.php
  • unpurposedunpurposed Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I can't find a single unnecessary hole in this thing. I mean, aside from this MemoryStick Duo slot...

    Wait, never mind. I found it. How odd.

    unpurposed on
  • slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Well, here it is in case anyone was wondering:


    I circled the hole in red:


    lapttk0.jpg

    slash000 on
  • PatboyXPatboyX Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Is this Phone Home or actually "Lojack for Laptops."

    I don't know that Phone Home is any better...but, I got my MacBook to take pictures of people who fail to get the password correctly. I have seen scripts that would then send these pictures to an account when next connected to the internet.
    Assuming the thief is an idiot, I think these things would work.

    PatboyX on
    "lenny bruce is not afraid..."
    brush1rt1.jpg
  • KrizKriz Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I'm pretty sure that for Macbooks there are programs that can run silently and check a server for any changes to a "status" file. if that file is modified to say "stolen" or something, the camera then starts taking photos and emails them to you, and I think it can also give you the IP address, a keylog, and other various things.

    hard drive encryption is very easy to do, and can render the data useless for anyone who doesn't know the password.

    http://www.truecrypt.org/ a free open source encryption program, supposed to be pretty much unbreakable.

    hell, put a password on the BIOS, change the boot order to always boot from the hard drive first, and that stops them from being able to just pop in a CD and wipe out all the data with ease.

    Kriz on
  • Legoman05Legoman05 Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Kriz wrote: »
    I'm pretty sure that for Macbooks there are programs that can run silently and check a server for any changes to a "status" file. if that file is modified to say "stolen" or something, the camera then starts taking photos and emails them to you, and I think it can also give you the IP address, a keylog, and other various things.

    hard drive encryption is very easy to do, and can render the data useless for anyone who doesn't know the password.

    http://www.truecrypt.org/ a free open source encryption program, supposed to be pretty much unbreakable.

    hell, put a password on the BIOS, change the boot order to always boot from the hard drive first, and that stops them from being able to just pop in a CD and wipe out all the data with ease.

    Open laptop, re-seat processor, set jumper to reset CMOS, back in business.

    Legoman05 on
  • Lucky CynicLucky Cynic Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I have a question, are you fucked if they take the laptop and then reformat it? And then use it to connect to the internet?

    Lucky Cynic on
  • GoofballGoofball Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I have a question, are you fucked if they take the laptop and then reformat it? And then use it to connect to the internet?

    With this software and other types of anti theft software like it, yes. The only solution that is really viable for this kind of thing is integrated hardware to handle the reporting.

    Goofball on
    Twitter: @TheGoofball
  • KrizKriz Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Legoman05 wrote: »
    Kriz wrote: »
    I'm pretty sure that for Macbooks there are programs that can run silently and check a server for any changes to a "status" file. if that file is modified to say "stolen" or something, the camera then starts taking photos and emails them to you, and I think it can also give you the IP address, a keylog, and other various things.

    hard drive encryption is very easy to do, and can render the data useless for anyone who doesn't know the password.

    http://www.truecrypt.org/ a free open source encryption program, supposed to be pretty much unbreakable.

    hell, put a password on the BIOS, change the boot order to always boot from the hard drive first, and that stops them from being able to just pop in a CD and wipe out all the data with ease.

    Open laptop, re-seat processor, set jumper to reset CMOS, back in business.

    notice that I said "with ease". obviously if they're knowledgeable enough they can bypass most anything you outfit the laptop with; there is no 100% guaranteed way to keep thieves out, deterring them is the best you can do.

    If it takes them time to wipe the drive, that's more time that your lojack program has to report their IP address to you, and more time for the cops to find them.

    I'd like to see someone make use of Linux motherboard BIOS to integrate that security program right into the flash memory on the motherboard; that'd be a nice security feature.

    Kriz on
  • KamiKami Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Yeah, in Dell notebooks (and you can get it in desktops, but that'd be a bit overkill), LoJack is built into the BIOS itself, so it's not a simple process of disabling/uninstalling the software. It literally goes wherever that laptop goes, unless you rebuild the entire laptop from scratch, which I'm pretty sure a thief wouldn't go to the trouble of doing. :P

    Kami on
  • KiTAKiTA Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    slash000 wrote: »
    If they're wiping the system, it's unlikely that they would not turn it on to test it first. It only takes a single login for Lojack to do its job.

    The Dell version of Lojack is a BIOS level setup -- even if they format Windows will install Lojack the second it can -- the motherboard reports Lojack as "hardware" to install that's required for the system to boot.

    Ninja-edit: Kami: Hi5!

    KiTA on
  • mr_ekimmr_ekim Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    However, even though the software is stored in BIOS, it needs to install itself into the OS as a application in order to work. If the would-be thief decides to use Linux or disables the NIC driver, then the system is rendered useless.

    That said, most thieves don't to consider anything other than just a simple reformat and windows install.

    mr_ekim on
    steam_sig.pngmrekim.phpmrekim.php
  • KamiKami Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    KiTA wrote: »
    slash000 wrote: »
    If they're wiping the system, it's unlikely that they would not turn it on to test it first. It only takes a single login for Lojack to do its job.

    The Dell version of Lojack is a BIOS level setup -- even if they format Windows will install Lojack the second it can -- the motherboard reports Lojack as "hardware" to install that's required for the system to boot.

    Ninja-edit: Kami: Hi5!

    <3

    KiTA and I are an unstoppable force of nastiness.

    Kami on
  • KiTAKiTA Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Kami wrote: »
    KiTA wrote: »
    slash000 wrote: »
    If they're wiping the system, it's unlikely that they would not turn it on to test it first. It only takes a single login for Lojack to do its job.

    The Dell version of Lojack is a BIOS level setup -- even if they format Windows will install Lojack the second it can -- the motherboard reports Lojack as "hardware" to install that's required for the system to boot.

    Ninja-edit: Kami: Hi5!

    <3

    KiTA and I are an unstoppable force of nastiness.

    No Service Tag is safe. The streets shall flow with the blood of the fallen PWS M90s.

    KiTA on
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