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Disc/Disk?

LewiePLewieP Registered User regular
edited August 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
So I know that in certain context's disc is spelt with a c and in some it's a k, can anyone clarify which is which?

LewieP on

Posts

  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I believe "Disk" is derived from "Diskette" Disk is short for Diskette.

    Disc is as in Compact Disc, or CD.

    I see Disk commonly used in reference to hard drives and floppy drives, and Disc for everything else.

    Jasconius on
  • SeñorAmorSeñorAmor !!! Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Round = disc
    Square = disk

    I'm sure there are some exceptions, but I can't think of any.

    SeñorAmor on
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    According to dictionary.com
    disc
    spelling preferred in England for most uses of disk (q.v.). Amer.Eng. tends to use it in the musical recording sense; originally of phonograph records, recently of compact discs. Discography first recorded 1933, from disc + ography. Hence, also, discophile "enthusiast for gramophone recordings" (1940).

    Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2001 Douglas Harper

    So they're almost interchangeable...

    dispatch.o on
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Round = disc
    Square = disk

    I'm sure there are some exceptions, but I can't think of any.

    Disk is generally used when referring to Magnetic media and Disc is usually used when refering to optical media.

    Ruckus on
  • VulpineVulpine Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I'd be tempted to agree with SeñorAmor: if it's round, disc, if not, disk.

    Vulpine on
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  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Vulpine wrote: »
    I'd be tempted to agree with SeñorAmor: if it's round, disc, if not, disk.
    I'd go with Ruckus for most purposes. The actual important part of floppy and hard disks, the part that is actually the disk, is round.

    The top listing here makes the most sense and is probably correct, though, given discography and such, which originated long before optical discs. For general purposes, though, I'd say going with Ruckus' rule will work though as disc has also gone to video with dvd and prior to cd, while there was discography, records and such were not called discs that I know of.

    Jimmy King on
  • KyanilisKyanilis Bellevue, WARegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    That's hardly a good way to define it. I'd go with the magnetic and optical description, after all, hard disks are contained in a rectangular housing, however they are round. Same with floppies for that matter.

    Kyanilis on
  • VulpineVulpine Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Jimmy King wrote: »
    I'd go with Ruckus for most purposes. The actual important part of floppy and hard disks, the part that is actually the disk, is round.

    The top listing here makes the most sense and is probably correct, though, given discography and such, which originated long before optical discs. For general purposes, though, I'd say going with Ruckus' rule will work though as disc has also gone to video with dvd and prior to cd, while there was discography, records and such were not called discs that I know of.

    That does, given more thought, make a lot more sense: Ruckus' rule it is, then. Regarding your last point, however, I'm pretty sure that shellac/vinyl records were definitely referred to as discs (at least originally, to distinguish them from Edison's wax cylinder system).

    Vulpine on
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  • EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I generally use Ruckus's rule as well (hard disk, compact disc), but what about non-media? Flying disc? Accretion disk?

    Of course, no sooner do I get curious than I look it up on Wikipedia, and sure enough, Ruckus is right. There's also other differentiations there, which will probably prove useful to the OP.

    EggyToast on
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  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Vulpine wrote: »
    Regarding your last point, however, I'm pretty sure that shellac/vinyl records were definitely referred to as discs (at least originally, to distinguish them from Edison's wax cylinder system).

    That's an interesting point. Physically, vinyl records and phonograph cylinders have much more in common with CDs and DVDs, except back then they used fine needles to physically "read" the analogue data (recorded as bumps/dips/imperfections in the vinyl). Nowadays CD and DVD's use laser light to do the same thing with digital pits/flats.

    Ruckus on
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