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Teen Living On Own

Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
edited August 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Could be a title of a porn. Anyway.

So due to a lot of family bullshit between my dad and I and the fact that my mom lives 300 miles away, I'm going to be finishing out my senior year on my own in an apartment, either a studio or a small 1b/1b deal. That's not what I need help with; it's set in stone, except for the actual location of the apartment.

What I need help on is just general advice for a 17 year-old living on his own. I am not going to be letting people binge drink in my place, and will not have more than 4 or 5 people over at any given time. I'm pretty much covered fiscally between working a shitload this summer and having my mom help me out if I need it. But what are some rules of thumb? Some internet sites that have good, easy, bachelor-esque recipes? Foods to always get at the grocery store? Basically, any things you've learned from living on your own.

I expect a lot of posts that say, "living on your own is a terrible idea. Don't do it". It's not my first choice, and I'm not overly happy about being thrust into this situation, but it's happening. Nothing to do about it. So I don't really want to hear about what I should do besides living on my own; I want to hear advice on how to make living on my own much simpler.

Thanks.

Charles Kinbote on
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    IreneDAdlerIreneDAdler Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Living on your own isn't a bad idea. Builds character and teaches you about responsibility and whatnot. Anyway:

    1) In order to keep your place from devolving into a pigsty, invest in organizational furniture. It doesn't have to be too nice. $20 plywood bookshelves from Costco, $5 stackable plastic drawers from Walmart, etc. Put a trashcan in every room so that you're never tempted to just toss something on the floor. Save your shopping bags for putting different sorts of garbage in. I put the paper recyclables in paper shopping bags, and plastic shopping bags are handy for cleaning sweeps. Always line all your garbage cans (not just the main one in the kitchen) to make taking the trash out easier and to keep the trash cans themselves from turning disgusting.

    2) I hate cooking because I hate doing dishes, so I like to buy stuff that I can either heat up in a pot or in the oven. One thing that I've found works really well is steak. Just get a chunk of beef from the grocery store (I personally like steaks from Trader Joe's), sprinkle with seasoned salt or steak sauce, throw in the oven for 15-25 minutes (depending on how cooked you like your cow). Also, those Bertoli frozen entree things aren't half bad; definitely way better than those microwavable TV dinners. People also seem to like the George Foreman grill. My college roommate had one which she used to make grilled chicken sandwiches. Also, I would recommend getting a steamer for... steaming stuff. I'm Asian, so I live on rice, which is why I need a steamer/rice cooker, but it's also really handy for cooking other stuff. For example, I love those BBQ pork buns (people who have had dim sum know what I'm talking about), and the best way to cook those is by steaming. Steamers are also handy for cooking vegetables, because a growing boy like you needs vegetables.

    3) Disposable silverware. I'm lazy and hate doing dishes, so I went through a phase using plastic forks and spoons so I can just throw them away after using them. I still use disposable chopsticks because chopsticks can get pretty questionable looking after repeated washing. You can take that a step farther and use paper plates and cups if you want. I know it's pretty wasteful, but, well, I REALLY hate doing dishes... >.>

    IreneDAdler on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Do you have someone to sign the rental agreement for you? I'm pretty sure up here you need to be legally able to enter into a contract (be 18). Otherwise, good luck, man.

    saggio on
    3DS: 0232-9436-6893
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    dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I will be amazed if it's easy to find a place that will rent to a minor?

    I suggest you not give the key out and not invite anyone over, ever.

    Im curious as to what crazy shit your dad did?

    dispatch.o on
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    ArgusArgus Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    I will be amazed if it's easy to find a place that will rent to a minor?

    I suggest you not give the key out and not invite anyone over, ever.

    Im curious as to what crazy shit your dad did?

    I believe this is the backstory, from a month or so back on this forum.

    Argus on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Thanks a ton, Irene.

    As far as age concerns, it's no biggy, the lease will be in my mom's name and we're letting all prospective landlords know that I'm going to be the main one inhabiting it.

    My dad and I basically just don't get along, he's been pretty bipolar since his divorce from my mom (9 years ago :/) and he'll regularly impose insane restrictions that he can't even bullshit a justification for and regularly admits that he does so just because he likes to. The fact that I'm a 4.0 student who has never gotten in trouble of any sort does nothing to sway him, so I basically just decided fuck it, I'm done.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Argus wrote: »
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    I will be amazed if it's easy to find a place that will rent to a minor?

    I suggest you not give the key out and not invite anyone over, ever.

    Im curious as to what crazy shit your dad did?

    I believe this is the backstory, from a month or so back on this forum.

    Indeed, kudos.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    DekuStickDekuStick Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Budgeting. It's pretty damn important. calculate out all your expenses and income and figure out a budget that works for you.

    Get it down on paper

    save all your receipts and take note of every piece of money you own. Keep track of it all.

    DekuStick on
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    The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Being as how I did the exact same thing when I was in high school: the number one thing is to go to school.. I know it will be tempting to just skip because, hey, who's gonna rag on you? But don't fall into that temptation.

    Secondly: experiment with cooking. Sure, have your standard easy to microwave food, but hey, it's your place you have all the time in the world. Play around in the kitchen. Discover things that are easy to make for you and hell, if they taste really good, not only do you have your own apartment to impress the ladies with, you are also a culinary genius.

    I reccomend always getting a bag of Boneless, Skinless chicken breasts, as it's really hard to screw up chicken, and lots of recipes call for it. Along with this, always have some ground beef. These two meats should be fine for you.

    Thirdly: Just because you can buy any food you want, doesn't mean you should. Seriously. Just because you will be buying a lot of microwaveable stuff, doesn't mean it also has to be terrible for you.

    The Lovely Bastard on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I expect to spend the first month slacking off as far as food is concerned, with lots of pasta, those microwavable Chicken Teriyaki bowls from Trader Joe's, ramen noodles, ricearoni, etc. I'll probably get sick of that pretty soon. Also, expecting a lot of chicken stir frys in my upcoming future. Even if I don't get tired of the same not-bad-for-me, easy shit, I'd love to be the one kid in my college dorm who could cook, so I'm pretty pumped to become an adequate cook.

    As far as studying goes, it'll be rough. I really, really don't want to screw up my academic record in my last year of school, and I'll have an easier time studying if I'm on my own, but I have a propensity to get by without studying, and my mom and step-dad have basically told me that if I get anything less than a 4.0 they might just drag me up to Colorado or send me to live with my grandparents, would be pretty terrible. Between my own college aspirations and the threats from my parents, I'm pretty sure I'll be able to manage, but I'm taking 4 AP classes, so it'll be rough.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    UnderdogUnderdog Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I expect to spend the first month slacking off as far as food is concerned, with lots of pasta, those microwavable Chicken Teriyaki bowls from Trader Joe's, ramen noodles, ricearoni, etc. I'll probably get sick of that pretty soon. Also, expecting a lot of chicken stir frys in my upcoming future. Even if I don't get tired of the same not-bad-for-me, easy shit, I'd love to be the one kid in my college dorm who could cook, so I'm pretty pumped to become an adequate cook.

    As far as studying goes, it'll be rough. I really, really don't want to screw up my academic record in my last year of school, and I'll have an easier time studying if I'm on my own, but I have a propensity to get by without studying, and my mom and step-dad have basically told me that if I get anything less than a 4.0 they might just drag me up to Colorado or send me to live with my grandparents, would be pretty terrible. Between my own college aspirations and the threats from my parents, I'm pretty sure I'll be able to manage, but I'm taking 4 AP classes, so it'll be rough.

    We have a multitude of great cooking threads floating around in h/a and d&d. The ones that come to mind are the "What's for dinner?" thread in dd and then there was some good stuff on what equipment to have in a recent "I'm rezing 1st year, what do I expect?" thread in h/a. I'll throw in some elbow grease and try to track them down for you.

    http://forums.penny-arcade.com/showthread.php?t=31347
    Skim through it and you should find the food/cooking advice.

    http://forums.penny-arcade.com/showthread.php?t=26850
    Here's the dinner thread in D&D. Some excellent stuff in there.

    On some general advice. If food was always prepared for you, there's a tendency to not cover all the necessary basics. Be sure to get your fruits in you. Apples are the best for fibre. You don't really want to take a dump and see blood in the toilet. Yeah, not fun.

    If you're trying something new in terms of cooking, do a sample size first. You don't want to make a huge bowl of something only to find out that immediately afterwards, the flavours don't really go together. It's a waste of food and money and time and worst of all, can discourage you from experimenting again in the future which is a bloody shame.

    Cast iron pan is awesome for cooking and braining pesky ninjas.

    Underdog on
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    MC MysteryMC Mystery Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Eggs are cheap and easy to cook food. Buy lots of eggs and cheese, I lived off of that and breakfast cereal during the brief stint I lived on my own with a few friends.

    MC Mystery on
    Your sig is too tall. -Thanatos
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    The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Have you already sent applications/been accepted to any schools yet?

    Also you might want to invest in a George Foreman grill.

    The Lovely Bastard on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Yeah breakfast for me will be entirely comprised of scrambled eggs, cereal and microwave bacon.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Have you already sent applications/been accepted to any schools yet?

    Also you might want to invest in a George Foreman grill.

    Nah, that's this October.

    and maybe I will. I'll see how much cooking I'm doing, and my desire to diversify.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I'm just saying, it's always better to have at least one cooking method other than is readily available with a stove.

    At my college apartment, I had an electric griddle, and there's nothing better than having some bitchin' burgers in the middle of a blizzard.

    The Lovely Bastard on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    You should seriously consider getting legally emancipated if your father isn't going to be any help with college expenses. And I mean, like, you should be talking to a lawyer right this second, since it ceases to be an option once you turn 18.

    Thanatos on
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    The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    What benefits does he get from being emancipated? I am not saying it might not be a good idea, I just think he should know what he gains/loses from the process.

    The Lovely Bastard on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    What benefits does he get from being emancipated? I am not saying it might not be a good idea, I just think he should know what he gains/loses from the process.
    The OP's parents'/father's income and assets wouldn't have to be included on the FAFSA, meaning, depending on how much money he's making, the OP could be eligible for anywhere from a bit more to a metric fuckton more financial aid.

    Thanatos on
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    UnderdogUnderdog Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Oh and do your dishes as you finish using them. Have some cereal? Wash the bowl and spoon the moment you're done. Eggs? Don't leave that dish in the sink, just clean it. Just do things as they come and you'll never be left with a mountain of dishes to do.

    Underdog on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Faggot 2 wrote: »
    What benefits does he get from being emancipated? I am not saying it might not be a good idea, I just think he should know what he gains/loses from the process.
    The OP's parents'/father's income and assets wouldn't have to be included on the FAFSA, meaning, depending on how much money he's making, the OP could be eligible for anywhere from a bit more to a metric fuckton more financial aid.
    Also, when I said he should be "talking to a lawyer," I meant he should be going over the pros and cons of it with one, not that he should be doing it.

    Thanatos on
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    zilozilo Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The best $50 I ever spent was on my electric wok. .3lb of beef or chicken, some teryaki sauce, and some instant rice makes for a tasty and dirt-cheap meal.

    zilo on
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    VoroVoro Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    My advice: After two weeks of microwave dinners, I'm sick of the damn things. They're not bad to have occasionally, but you need some proper food every so often. I also recommend getting a George Foreman Grill. Buy a large bag of frozen chicken breasts, some teriyaki sauce, some pineapple (and maybe some form of tupperware container for the leftovers), country potato/hamburger buns, and ziplock bags. Let the chicken breasts defrost and marinate in the ziplock bags overnight and good times will be had.

    And ditto to what Underdog said. Even if you have a dishwasher, rinse the dishes and put them in the moment you're done using them. Life is so much easier that way.

    Voro on
    XBL GamerTag: Comrade Nexus
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    sounds like I'm getting a George Foreman grill.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Seriously, microwave dinners are really pretty bad. They look oh so tasty in the picture on the box, but the reality is pretty dissapointing. They also tend to have a hell of a lot of salt in them.

    When I was learning to cook for myself, there were two basics that worked well for me. Pasta+Sauce+Stuff and Rice+Stuff. Pasta and Stirfrys are both easy to make and good to experiment with. You can get a rice-cooker dirt cheap too, so you won't even have to worry about the rice, not that its all that hard to cook it in a pot or anything, but the rice cooker is a nice "set it and forget it" option. I'm not too proud to admit that I was a happy owner of Cooking for Dummies either.

    Its an old thread, but there's a fair amount of good advice about cooking in Low Budget Cooking for the Average Geek

    Try to eat fresh, not processed foods when possible. You'll feel, and think, better, on quality fuel then on processed stuff which is often full of a lot of stuff thats not so great for you.

    Get in the habit of cleaning your dishes after dinner. Letting that shit pile up is both disgusting, and just makes them harder to clean in the long run. Plus, in your post-secondary education, you'll probably end up living with other people at some point, so you may as well establish habits that will make you a good room-mate now. Having lived with something like thirty different people as roommates in my life, I can tell you that the one dude who leaves the kitchen a mess for other people is a dude you do not want to be.

    Also, for living on your own, get a tool kit. Its very useful to have a basic one around.

    Oh, and know your rights in regards to Landlord/Tenant relations in your area. Your state or province's website should have a break down of what a landlord and tenant's responsibilities and rights are. One of the best ways not to get screwed over is to know your rights.

    It may also be a good idea to establish early on with your friends the ground rules about them using your place. IE "This is not where you come every time you want to do something your parents won't let you do" or whatever it is that you want. Its better to establish this early on.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I really have no illusions as to the usefulness of microwaves. There's a single "microwave meal" I can eat, and that's the Trader Joe's chicken teriyaki bowl. If you haven't tried it, it's delicious. Beyond that, it's bacon and reheating pizza/pasta/pork.

    As far as my friends go, I expect to have to deal with a lot of shit from them pushing the limits. I'm the one dude with his own apartment; it'll probably be an incredible novelty for them. Every person I've told about this has said "gonna be throwing some killer parties, eh?" No, no, no. No partying, no heavy drinking. I'll allow casual beer-drinking, but if you throw up in there, you won't be allowed to drink in or near my apartment for a month. I understand I'll have to be the responsible person in this scenario, and will do so even if it makes me look like a dick.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    also, what do you guys recommend getting on my grocery store runs (particularly my first one). I'm looking for stuff without an incredible time limit, because I need to get a sense of how much I consume.

    I'm thinking (for the first one) (spoilered for long)
    paper towels
    toilet paper
    snack foods (goldfish, corn chips)
    orange juice
    cranberry juice
    six-pack of soda
    toothpaste
    maybe some chicken breasts
    teriyaki bowl
    bell peppers and onions
    soy sauce
    coconut milk
    pasta (esp. ravioli or tortellini, stuff with substance)
    Febreze
    white rice
    Ricearoni
    salt and pepper
    string cheese
    wheat bread
    lettuce
    sandwich meat (turkey, chicken, ham)
    mustard and ketchup
    olive oil
    microwave bacon

    edit: also, tortillas and assorted fajita stuffs

    Charles Kinbote on
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    AurinAurin Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Shampoo, conditioner, bodywash... Hrm

    Try to think of things that you use every single day. :P

    Otherwise that looks like a good list, just keep track of what fruits/vegetables that you can go through before they start to go bad... I'm still terrible at that even after 6 years of living on my own I get apples going bad before I can eat em all. :P

    Edit: Oh, and macaroni and cheese is an easy meal able to be cooked in the microwave. :)

    Aurin on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Thanks to being lactose intolerant when I was a kid, I'm now pretty finicky about a lot of dairy things...mostly cheese and milk. I can have milk with cereal, but I can't stand the taste alone, and melted cheese is for some reason impossible for me to eat. Cheeseburgers, mac and cheese, enchiladas, cheese on sandwiches, it's all out the window for me. I can have string cheese, or slice up a block of cheddar and munch on that or have it with crackers, but nothing really past that.

    Charles Kinbote on
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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Whenever I used to move to a new place, I always made sure I had the following (on top of normal groceries):

    1 big ass cooking pot
    1 Case cheapo instant noodles (mmm, chicken)
    1 Case tinned tomato soup
    1 case tinned mushroom soup
    1 big box of potato flakes
    1 case microwavable popcorn.

    Serves pretty well as an 'I'm fucked' food supply. All of it keeps for ages, and you can use pretty much any condiment/meat/leftover you have in the fridge with at least one of those things. It's also very inexpensive stuff to buy, so it's usually no big deal to restock if you run out. The theory goes, that if you live too close to the edge, sooner or later, you will become fucked. Maybe for a day or two, maybe for a week. During those times, you'll at least have something to eat, and when combined with basic flavor residue from whatever happens to be around, it's not exactly the same thing every night. Sort of a culinary 'Plan B' if you will. Seriously, you won't ever regret having a non-perishable food stash, but I guarantee that sometime you'll regret not having one.

    Sarcastro on
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    IreneDAdlerIreneDAdler Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    That looks like a pretty reasonable list. You probably shouldn't allow yourself more than 1 or 2 bags of snacks, to avoid tempting yourself to be lazy and make meals out of them. Also, as someone else mentioned, it's always good to have some chicken on hand to heat up and eat. What I usually do is buy a huge pack of chicken breasts (boneless and skinless to save on prep time and cuz I'm finicky) and put them into separate ziplock bags, and put them in the freezer. Don't just buy a jumbo pack of chicken and throw the whole thing into the freezer, because it will freeze as one solid chicken ice cube, and will be a pain in the ass to separate. Putting each piece of chicken into single-serving size bags (usually 2 breasts for me since I cook for 2 people) will save you from having to break out the ice pick when you want some chicken.

    Oh yeah, that's another thing. Ziplock bags. And foil. And probably some Saran wrap. Maybe some Gladware (those disposable tupperware thingies) to store leftovers. That reminds me, some people who hate cooking do it once a week in a giant cooking binge. They make a bunch of meals, put them in tupperware and store them in the fridge, and reheat a portion for each meal. That might work well for your chicken stir-fry idea, or any other food that stores well in the fridge, like macaroni or pasta salad.

    IreneDAdler on
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    NorgothNorgoth cardiffRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    . That reminds me, some people who hate cooking do it once a week in a giant cooking binge. They make a bunch of meals, put them in tupperware and store them in the fridge, and reheat a portion for each meal. That might work well for your chicken stir-fry idea, or any other food that stores well in the fridge, like macaroni or pasta salad.


    Except the reheating chicken is a very very bad idea. Seriously, thats like the first thing I got taught in cookery at school.

    Norgoth on
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    ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Okay, my advice, coming from experience:

    AVOID MICROWAVE MEALS AND TWO MIN NOODLES LIKE THE PLAGUE.

    They'll kill you. After a week of it you'll feel sick, tired and mentally lethargic. Instead, learn two basic recipes and cook large quantities at a time for refrigeration and later reheating.

    1) Beef mince. In order: dice two onions, two cloves of garlic. Place in BIG pot with oil and start cooking. Add a kilo of good beef mince, get it from a butcher, not the supermarket. Stir and let it all brown. Add diced carrots, wait a bit, diced mushrooms, wait a bit, some oregano and some salt. If you like tomatos then add two cans of diced tomatoes. Let it boil down, it'll feed you for four days and can be added to spaghetti, rice, on toast, rolled up in pita bread...

    2) Chicken stir fry. Get a big-ass wok, start with two onions and two cloves of garlic, then a kilo of diced chicken. I can get a kilo of chicken for $6 AUS at Aldi. This is where you add the sauce; pour in a bunch of soy sauce and, if you have a microwave, melt a small bowl of honey and pour that in too. Then add diced chicken, bok choy, spring onions, mushrooms, brocolli. Should again feed you for 3-4 days. Eat with anything you please.

    Seriously, the one thing that I tell everyone about to move out is to eat well. If you try and live for too cheap, you'll hate yourself. Waking up will hurt. EAT WELL.

    EDIT - I read your list. Take off the soda, it'll be the most expensive thing you buy and won't do you any good. Also, for cheap chicken, buy chicken legs and strip the chicken off instead of buying chicken breast. Takes longer but costs around half as much for the same weight in meat.

    ruzkin on
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    marty_0001marty_0001 I am a file and you put documents in meRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Amen to the electric wok. I love that thing!

    Who's paying to buy all your stuff when you move in to this place? When I moved out I spent every day of the first week going to the shops to buy something that I needed. Living at home, you don't realise how many little things you take for granted. I anticipated this, filled an A4 page with stuff to pick up, and it still wasn't enough. Tea towels. The little thing that holds your paper towels. Ice cube trays. Bath mat. SO MUCH STUFF. Anyway the reason I ask who's paying is that it's a good idea to have some cash reserved for those moments when you go "Oh shit! I need one of THOSE things!".

    All the best for living on your own. I moved out of home cos I didn't particularly enjoy the situation there. Moved in with a couple of housemates and hated them. Moved out on my own, haven't regretted it for a single second.
    Well, except when you're sick, that's when you're still responsible for yourself and you're pretty screwed for being able to do stuff. Add some cold/flu tablets to your list. And all the other basic medicinals.

    marty_0001 on
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    nazlannazlan Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Avoid processed and pre-prepared foods, and learn to read ingredient lists! Most prepped stuff is full of high fructose corn syrup and MSG, and that shit's just not good for you.

    nazlan on
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    joshua1joshua1 Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I managed to traverse EU alone for 8 months when 17-18, I came out fine. (got thrown out of Romania, but thats another story) Few things I noticed, though, is GET COOKING DONE ASAP. For along while i would start to cook when I started to feel hungry.... which meant usually it was another hour or more before I would eat. Admittedly, I was making vegetable stew mostly, which took a while to reduce, but the point still stands. Get it done quick, and then you won't go mad with hunger waiting for your delicious foods. Oh, and make some friends. Cause living by yourself can get awful lonely.

    joshua1 on
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    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    How much do electric wok's usually run, and what kinda stuff are they used for?

    Charles Kinbote on
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    SamiSami Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Buy frozen, buy in bulk.

    Get a 50lb bag of rice and you will have food for a year.

    Sami on
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    Legoman05Legoman05 Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    There's a 'low budget cooking for the average geek' thread in either the Archives or Accumulated Forum Knowledge. It's fantastic.

    The trick to eating cheap is trying not to live too cheap. If you try to live on nothing but ramen, you'll pay 5 cents a meal, and you'll get tired of it, and blow $5 on fast food.

    Stock up on a lot of your favorite stuff that's good to cook, and you'll pay $1-3 a meal.

    Put yourself on an allowance for all non-gas, non-grocery spending. Maybe, $50 a week for like, store purchases and $20 a week for coffee or what have you.

    Legoman05 on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Saving your leftovers is almost always a good idea, even if it's not enough to make a full meal of. If you have some leftover chicken bones with some meat on them, for example, it's a piece of cake to put them in some water with rice and whatever veggies and spices you like. Voila! Homemade chicken soup.

    Trowizilla on
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    graizurgraizur __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2007
    I am jailed and cannot maek new thread poast, I need Help making an invoice for a new job. I have never worked as a freelancer before and these guys are all professionals photographers and stuff. Help!

    How I maek Invoys?

    graizur on
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