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Nobody cares about your age.

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    WashWash Sweet Christmas Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    ege02 wrote: »
    However, when I thought about it I found it understandable that asking a person how much they weigh is considered rude, since society stigmatizes obesity.

    Where have you been, man, society's pretty damn ageist. People make a lot of assumptions based on what age group you belong to, such as maturity and various stereotypes perpetuated by the media.

    Wash on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Edgewood wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    However, when I thought about it I found it understandable that asking a person how much they weigh is considered rude, since society stigmatizes obesity.
    Where have you been, man, society's pretty damn ageist. People make a lot of assumptions based on what age group you belong to, such as maturity and various stereotypes perpetuated by the media.
    Also, various stereotypes perpetuated by the actions of your generation.

    Like the Baby Boomers. And the elderly.

    Thanatos on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Edgewood wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    However, when I thought about it I found it understandable that asking a person how much they weigh is considered rude, since society stigmatizes obesity.

    Where have you been, man, society's pretty damn ageist. People make a lot of assumptions based on what age group you belong to, such as maturity and various stereotypes perpetuated by the media.

    damn cheeky teenager, go do your homework

    The Cat on
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    nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Nobody's made a single comment about Shinto's lawn yet

    amazing.

    nexuscrawler on
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    ShintoShinto __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2007
    Why are you fascinated with me. Just get over it. This thread isn't about me.

    Back on topic - I feel weird as a 26 year old undergraduate.

    Shinto on
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Thinatos wrote: »
    Edgewood wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    However, when I thought about it I found it understandable that asking a person how much they weigh is considered rude, since society stigmatizes obesity.
    Where have you been, man, society's pretty damn ageist. People make a lot of assumptions based on what age group you belong to, such as maturity and various stereotypes perpetuated by the media.
    Also, various stereotypes perpetuated by the actions of your generation.

    Like the Baby Boomers. And the elderly.

    The only population problem is the Baby Boomer problem.

    electricitylikesme on
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    WashWash Sweet Christmas Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Thinatos wrote: »
    Edgewood wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    However, when I thought about it I found it understandable that asking a person how much they weigh is considered rude, since society stigmatizes obesity.
    Where have you been, man, society's pretty damn ageist. People make a lot of assumptions based on what age group you belong to, such as maturity and various stereotypes perpetuated by the media.
    Also, various stereotypes perpetuated by the actions of your generation.

    Ya, some teenagers ruin things for the rest. It's truly frustrating when the elderly cross the street when you're walking in their direction with a small group of friends. Even more so when you turn around to see them conversing, all whispers, and looking at you disapprovingly. Just for fucking walking down the street.

    Thankfully I'm 18 now, so I can almost get away with saying I'm no longer a teenager. I know it's eighteen but I'm a legal adult now so shut up about it.

    Wash on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Shinto wrote: »
    Why are you fascinated with me. Just get over it. This thread isn't about me.

    Back on topic - I feel weird as a 26 year old undergraduate.

    3 of my classmates were in their mid-30's, and another was like 45. Mind you, QUT has pretty much no student culture at all due to the huge number of antisocial international students and the total lack of dorms.

    The Cat on
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    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited August 2007
    So wait, male gaze - is that like Eddy and Mr^2?

    (I'm sorry. I was compelled.)
    Shinto wrote: »
    Back on topic - I feel weird as a 26 year old undergraduate.

    Man I was one too. Don't sweat it, your teachers will shower you with love on the perhaps baseless assumption that you are more serious and will care more. (It rules, seriously. When I slacked it was clearly because I was a hard-working self-supporting adult instead of a lazy bum kid; when I excelled it was the same thing!)

    Jacobkosh on
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Man Aem, I had no idea Gstrings had that kind of power.

    I'm not saying it's manipulating men or anything -- I'm really not trying to play into misandrist stereotypes. Just, you know, it's depressing to see all these young women who willingly commodify themselves, and even worse is when they confuse that with sexual liberation. It's frustrating.
    Not that I think you're wrong exactly, but perhaps overstating the phenomenon. For one thing, the idealisation of the young female and the dismissal of the older is hardly a new thing.

    You're right, of course. I was just pointing out what I feel to be the major cause these days, seeing as how child-bearing is less of a concern for a lot of people in the younger generations.

    Also, what's the "Male gaze"?

    I think I've heard that term before, but I don't really know what it means.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    dvshermandvsherman Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    CangoFett wrote: »
    You can fly anywhere in the US you want without ID, I believe. Though Ive only flown like once, and at the expense of my parents.

    However, with the RealID act, you will need to show your papers to even drive across state lines.

    If the RealID act passes, I will be one step closer to moving to Svalbard.

    Not to be a downer, but according to wikipedia, the RealID act was passed into law on May 11, 2005. Guess we'll see you in Svalbard?

    Well.. really, it's passed, but not in effect, and like, 20 states are actively opposing it. This should be fun to watch in the coming years.

    And I'm totally off topic. Sorry.

    dvsherman on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    I'm not saying it's manipulating men or anything -- I'm really not trying to play into misandrist stereotypes. Just, you know, it's depressing to see all these young women who willingly commodify themselves, and even worse is when they confuse that with sexual liberation. It's frustrating.

    That's not what I was saying. I was more attacking the notion that a female's clothing choices are responsible for what's happening. Also, your cheerful willingness to ascribe motive to people you don't know.

    The Cat on
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Aemilius wrote: »
    I'm not saying it's manipulating men or anything -- I'm really not trying to play into misandrist stereotypes. Just, you know, it's depressing to see all these young women who willingly commodify themselves, and even worse is when they confuse that with sexual liberation. It's frustrating.

    That's not what I was saying. I was more attacking the notion that a female's clothing choices are responsible for what's happening. Also, your cheerful willingness to ascribe motive to people you don't know.

    Oh no, you misunderstand. I don't think it's the women's clothing choices that are the cause -- no, they're a symptom.

    I mean, thongs aren't really a big deal, but just the general exhibitionist trend. I don't honestly know what exactly caused this kind of stuff to become so mainstream. I'm not going to try to figure that out, either, because it isn't really that important so long as you can correct it.

    And, you know, just a shot in the dark here, Cat, but girls who appear in Girls Gone Wild probably aren't doing it to advance women's rights. Just a guess.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    Low KeyLow Key Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I care about people's age. Anywhere up to around thirty you can very easily get a pretty general idea of where a person's at in life from their age, at least in this city where everyone's life takes one of three possible branches very quickly out of high school.

    Making judgements based on approximate age is so ingrained in us, and happens so automatically, that trying to hide your birthdate seems a little ridiculous. It does seem to have a lot to do with how older people want to be viewed. A korean girl I know was totally confused by people's reluctance to be asked about age in Australia, and we figured that was because of cultural differences in how old people are viewed.

    Low Key on
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    NavocNavoc Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    Also, what's the "Male gaze"?

    I think I've heard that term before, but I don't really know what it means.

    This is a good explanation.

    Navoc on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Aemilius wrote: »
    I'm not saying it's manipulating men or anything -- I'm really not trying to play into misandrist stereotypes. Just, you know, it's depressing to see all these young women who willingly commodify themselves, and even worse is when they confuse that with sexual liberation. It's frustrating.

    That's not what I was saying. I was more attacking the notion that a female's clothing choices are responsible for what's happening. Also, your cheerful willingness to ascribe motive to people you don't know.

    Oh no, you misunderstand. I don't think it's the women's clothing choices that are the cause -- no, they're a symptom.

    I mean, thongs aren't really a big deal, but just the general exhibitionist trend. I don't honestly know what exactly caused this kind of stuff to become so mainstream. I'm not going to try to figure that out, either, because it isn't really that important so long as you can correct it.

    Maybe, but it certainly beats the alternative. And I don't think there's necessarily an 'exhibitionist trend', just that the option to wear less now exists and some people are therefore taking it up. Its not like one can't find modest clothes if one wishes.
    And, you know, just a shot in the dark here, Cat, but girls who appear in Girls Gone Wild probably aren't doing it to advance women's rights. Just a guess.

    I also doubt they're doing it for the reasons you ascribe. They're usually too drunk for higher reasoning.

    The Cat on
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    YodaTunaYodaTuna Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    When I worked for Blockbuster, I had to open accounts for new customers which involved filling out a contract. Well since it's a contract, it needs your birthdate on it to verify that you can legally enter that contract.

    I had one lady who was clearly like 40 just scream at me when I asked for her birthdate like I gave two shits when she was fucking born. I pretty much told her as such. There was no one else near so it's not like anyone else would hear(or care). My mom is older than you, who the fuck cares? She left in a huff saying she was going to Hollywood Video despite me telling her they have the exact same application process. Some people don't listen.

    Some people are so god damn sensitive.

    YodaTuna on
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    Vrtra TheoryVrtra Theory Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Aemilius wrote: »
    Oh no, you misunderstand. I don't think it's the women's clothing choices that are the cause -- no, they're a symptom.

    I mean, thongs aren't really a big deal, but just the general exhibitionist trend. I don't honestly know what exactly caused this kind of stuff to become so mainstream. I'm not going to try to figure that out, either, because it isn't really that important so long as you can correct it.

    Maybe, but it certainly beats the alternative. And I don't think there's necessarily an 'exhibitionist trend', just that the option to wear less now exists and some people are therefore taking it up. Its not like one can't find modest clothes if one wishes.

    I'd actually take that one step further. Just because a woman isn't wearing a nice heavy sweater and a brooch doesn't mean she considers herself "product", and it certainly doesn't make her an exhibitionist.

    Vrtra Theory on
    Are you a Software Engineer living in Seattle? HBO is hiring, message me.
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    VariableVariable Mouth Congress Stroke Me Lady FameRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    a lot of people hand me their license when I ask for that information at radioshack. usually it's already out for some other stuff, but they refuse to say it out loud.

    it is odd.

    Variable on
    BNet-Vari#1998 | Switch-SW 6960 6688 8388 | Steam | Twitch
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    I also doubt they're doing it for the reasons you ascribe. They're usually too drunk for higher reasoning.

    Really? You don't think they do it in part because that's what they think boys want? Because objectifying yourself is the way, in many social circles (and arguably mainstream American/Western culture) for women to prove that you're fun and trendy and with-it?

    It just seems kind of fucked up to me how hotness is so paramount, and how willingly, even unquestioningly many girls my age objectify themselves.

    I'm all for girls having lots of sex, enjoying sex, advancing sexual pleasure for women. That's great, and go for it. But I do wonder how much of the whole promiscuous culture these days is for the women, and how much of it is what they do to gain approval.

    Maybe my first post was an exaggeration (I was agitated from the Intolerance thread), but I think you're being a bit dismissive.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    Vrtra TheoryVrtra Theory Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Quick anecdote: I recently had about a year-long relationship with a woman roughly ten years my senior. I say "roughly" because I never actually asked how old she was - every time I thought about this, I just said to myself "eh, doesn't really matter, besides, it seems kinda rude."

    At the time, I did not second-guess myself, but as I'm reading this thread it strikes me just how bizarre it is that I thought it might be rude to ask the woman I was having sex with how old she was.

    Vrtra Theory on
    Are you a Software Engineer living in Seattle? HBO is hiring, message me.
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I also doubt they're doing it for the reasons you ascribe. They're usually too drunk for higher reasoning.

    Really? You don't think they do it in part because that's what they think boys want? Because objectifying yourself is the way, in many social circles (and arguably mainstream American/Western culture) for women to prove that you're fun and trendy and with-it?

    It just seems kind of fucked up to me how hotness is so paramount, and how willingly, even unquestioningly many girls my age objectify themselves.

    I'm all for girls having lots of sex, enjoying sex, advancing sexual pleasure for women. That's great, and go for it. But I do wonder how much of the whole promiscuous culture these days is for the women, and how much of it is what they do to gain approval.

    Maybe my first post was an exaggeration (I was agitated from the Intolerance thread), but I think you're being a bit dismissive.

    No, I see where you're coming from, and you're not wrong, but I think you're not making enough room for the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels. You're acting like the joke's always on us, and it bothers me. The expression of female sexuality is definitely constrained within a net of male-defined acceptable behaviour, but that doesn't mean we never have any fun.

    The Cat on
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    Oh, and I'm not saying you have to wear baggy clothes all the time, or something. I think there's a pretty obvious line between trying to look attractive because you personally want to attract people, and dressing in an objectifying way.

    I see girls all the time who are attractively dressed. And then there's our roomate, who dresses in some pretty outrageous ways. And, as I know her fairly well, I think it's safe to say she's doing it to get male attention because that's how she gets approval. She objectifies herself to gain social approval. I can say that without really any doubt in my mind. Sure, it's her choice, but there's a social pressure to do it, and just because it's her choice doesn't make it particularly healthy, or conducive to feminist goals.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Aemilius wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I also doubt they're doing it for the reasons you ascribe. They're usually too drunk for higher reasoning.

    Really? You don't think they do it in part because that's what they think boys want? Because objectifying yourself is the way, in many social circles (and arguably mainstream American/Western culture) for women to prove that you're fun and trendy and with-it?

    It just seems kind of fucked up to me how hotness is so paramount, and how willingly, even unquestioningly many girls my age objectify themselves.

    I'm all for girls having lots of sex, enjoying sex, advancing sexual pleasure for women. That's great, and go for it. But I do wonder how much of the whole promiscuous culture these days is for the women, and how much of it is what they do to gain approval.

    Maybe my first post was an exaggeration (I was agitated from the Intolerance thread), but I think you're being a bit dismissive.

    No, I see where you're coming from, and you're not wrong, but I think you're not making enough room for the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels. You're acting like the joke's always on us, and it bothers me. The expression of female sexuality is definitely constrained within a net of male-defined acceptable behaviour, but that doesn't mean we never have any fun.

    You're right. I haven't really expressed that properly yet. I think maybe my last post (made just after yours) clarifies this a little bit.

    I guess maybe when it becomes serial behavior is when it starts to make me question the decision. Again, my roommate is a good example. I don't think I've ever really seen her wear something that was merely attractive -- it seems like she's trying to turn herself into something men can stare at and find gratification in staring at. And she gets attention and approval for that. She could easily tone it down about sixteen notches and still look more beautiful than 99.99% of women out there, but she doesn't. She goes past attractive and into something you would find in Maxim magazine. Every night.

    Is that healthy? Is that reinforcing a culture that views women in an independant, positive way? I don't think so.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels.

    If it's any consolation, Cat, having been in Aem's shoes way back when I can say that this sort of paternalistic "oh noes they're being exploited" isn't necessarily about the wimmins - although yeah, that's probably part of it - but a desire to sort of identify oneself as standing in stark relief to the sort of dudes who are all about thongs or whatever. Like, I'd stoke up this warm glow of self-satisfaction because I paid attention to the girls in sweaters whom no-one ever talked about. Clearly I was the more advanced human being. You know the drill, I'm sure.

    Jacobkosh on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels.

    If it's any consolation, Cat, having been in Aem's shoes way back when I can say that this sort of paternalistic "oh noes they're being exploited" isn't necessarily about the wimmins - although yeah, that's probably part of it - but a desire to sort of identify oneself as standing in stark relief to the sort of dudes who are all about thongs or whatever. Like, I'd stoke up this warm glow of self-satisfaction because I paid attention to the girls in sweaters whom no-one ever talked about. Clearly I was the more advanced human being. You know the drill, I'm sure.

    Yeah, I know where its coming from, and its cute but unnecessary. If you're not part of the problem, you're not part of the problem.

    Aem, if your friend likes minis and crazy amounts of mascara, well meh. And what's wrong with wanting to be leered at? You're still falling into the trap of assuming she's not aware of all this, and that her choices are made suspect by the people around her.

    The Cat on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels.

    If it's any consolation, Cat, having been in Aem's shoes way back when I can say that this sort of paternalistic "oh noes they're being exploited" isn't necessarily about the wimmins - although yeah, that's probably part of it - but a desire to sort of identify oneself as standing in stark relief to the sort of dudes who are all about thongs or whatever. Like, I'd stoke up this warm glow of self-satisfaction because I paid attention to the girls in sweaters whom no-one ever talked about. Clearly I was the more advanced human being. You know the drill, I'm sure.

    Yeah, I know where its coming from, and its cute but unnecessary. If you're not part of the problem, you're not part of the problem.

    Aem, if your friend likes minis and crazy amounts of mascara, well meh. And what's wrong with wanting to be leered at? You're still falling into the trap of assuming she's not aware of all this, and that her choices are made suspect by the people around her.

    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    And how is any of this confined to one gender?

    The Cat on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    And how is any of this confined to one gender?

    it isn't, but no one talks about the "female stare"

    i think there's the implication that guys should enjoy and welcome any attention that they get, cuz we're all sex obsessed horndogs

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels.

    If it's any consolation, Cat, having been in Aem's shoes way back when I can say that this sort of paternalistic "oh noes they're being exploited" isn't necessarily about the wimmins - although yeah, that's probably part of it - but a desire to sort of identify oneself as standing in stark relief to the sort of dudes who are all about thongs or whatever. Like, I'd stoke up this warm glow of self-satisfaction because I paid attention to the girls in sweaters whom no-one ever talked about. Clearly I was the more advanced human being. You know the drill, I'm sure.

    Yeah, I know where its coming from, and its cute but unnecessary. If you're not part of the problem, you're not part of the problem.

    Aem, if your friend likes minis and crazy amounts of mascara, well meh. And what's wrong with wanting to be leered at? You're still falling into the trap of assuming she's not aware of all this, and that her choices are made suspect by the people around her.

    Hm.

    I'm probably not doing the idea justice, really. I've had this sort of vague gut-feeling about the whole thing for a while, and then for my Politics of Gender class I picked up the cheapest book (all the other ones were way beyond what I had on me) called Female Chauvinist Pigs. It's pretty interesting, and I felt it was a good articulation of my gut feelings regarding "raunch culture" as she (Ariel Levy) calls it.

    It makes a lot of sense to me, but I think I may not be expressing it properly. I've kind of been rushing through it -- it's a good read.

    And yeah, jacob may have hit on a slight motivation of mine. :P

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Man Aem, I had no idea Gstrings had that kind of power.

    I'm not saying it's manipulating men or anything

    I'd just like to take this opportunity to say that I for one welcome our new g-string-clad overlords...

    Loren Michael on
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    dvshermandvsherman Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Man Aem, I had no idea Gstrings had that kind of power.

    I'm not saying it's manipulating men or anything

    I'd just like to take this opportunity to say that I for one welcome our new g-string-clad overlords...

    I would prefer commando overlords, but that sounds a tad bit more violent than what I was imagining.

    dvsherman on
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    Also, I may be going a bit overboard because I've just started getting into feminism (mostly thanks to this forum, really), and I feel maybe just a little bit guilty about being mostly oblivious to misogyny for basically my whole life. Except the really obvious stuff, but no one's really debating that.

    So, yeah, I'm still trying to find my footing on the subject. Hence me taking a Politics of Gender class. Well, that and it should have a lot of strong-willed, intelligent, independant women in it. Maybe I'll get to touch their boobies.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    And how is any of this confined to one gender?

    it isn't, but no one talks about the "female stare"

    i think there's the implication that guys should enjoy and welcome any attention that they get, cuz we're all sex obsessed horndogs

    No, I think you're confusing a couple of concepts here. Firstly, I've heard plenty of guys ewwwwing about how its totally grody chick came on to them and how like, she must have been crazy. That's pretty much a universal experience if you're out in public. Its a wholly separate thing from the notion that most mainstream media, and to an extent female public behaviour, since most of that is a performance, is constructed with an assumed het male audience in mind.

    The Cat on
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    WashWash Sweet Christmas Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    And how is any of this confined to one gender?

    it isn't, but no one talks about the "female stare"

    i think there's the implication that guys should enjoy and welcome any attention that they get, cuz we're all sex obsessed horndogs

    That's always seemed like a weird stereotype to me. I remember once being practically offered sex by a female friend of mine, and after repeatedly declining, I was yelled at and accused of being completely asexual. She and some of her friends started acting like not taking her up on her offer meant I didn't like women. Strange, really.

    Wash on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    And how is any of this confined to one gender?

    it isn't, but no one talks about the "female stare"

    i think there's the implication that guys should enjoy and welcome any attention that they get, cuz we're all sex obsessed horndogs

    No, I think you're confusing a couple of concepts here. Firstly, I've heard plenty of guys ewwwwing about how its totally grody chick came on to them and how like, she must have been crazy. That's pretty much a universal experience if you're out in public. Its a wholly separate thing from the notion that most mainstream media, and to an extent female public behaviour, since most of that is a performance, is constructed with an assumed het male audience in mind.

    i'm not saying that it isn't, but i don't think you can deny that mainstream media generally portrays guys in social situations as always looking to score or on "the prowl" or some shit. it's harmful to both sexes, but the overall implication is that guys respond positively to when women do that kind of thing, and if that doesn't appeal to a guy, then there's something wrong with the guy rather than the girl.

    i mean, i've heard pleanty of women ewwwwing about a guy who tried to hit on them (and i'm sure you have too). the assumption THERE when that's overheard is that the guy did something wrong or was gross or whatever.

    i guess what i'm saying is that when it comes to things like the "male stare," there's the general attitude that men are in the wrong for being leering pigs, but if the situation is reversed, men are still at fault for either not accepting the attention or being stuck up assholes.


    edit:
    Edgewood wrote: »
    That's always seemed like a weird stereotype to me. I remember once being practically offered sex by a female friend of mine, and after repeatedly declining, I was yelled at and accused of being completely asexual. She and some of her friends started acting like not taking her up on her offer meant I didn't like women. Strange, really.

    that's pretty much what i'm getting at

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels.

    If it's any consolation, Cat, having been in Aem's shoes way back when I can say that this sort of paternalistic "oh noes they're being exploited" isn't necessarily about the wimmins - although yeah, that's probably part of it - but a desire to sort of identify oneself as standing in stark relief to the sort of dudes who are all about thongs or whatever. Like, I'd stoke up this warm glow of self-satisfaction because I paid attention to the girls in sweaters whom no-one ever talked about. Clearly I was the more advanced human being. You know the drill, I'm sure.
    Ah teenage reasoning.

    electricitylikesme on
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    sdrawkcaB emaNsdrawkcaB emaN regular
    edited August 2007
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    the notion that hey, girls like sex too, and feeling sexy, and so they're not necessarily being used every time they step out of the house in heels.

    If it's any consolation, Cat, having been in Aem's shoes way back when I can say that this sort of paternalistic "oh noes they're being exploited" isn't necessarily about the wimmins - although yeah, that's probably part of it - but a desire to sort of identify oneself as standing in stark relief to the sort of dudes who are all about thongs or whatever. Like, I'd stoke up this warm glow of self-satisfaction because I paid attention to the girls in sweaters whom no-one ever talked about. Clearly I was the more advanced human being. You know the drill, I'm sure.
    Ah teenage reasoning.

    Hey now. Sweaters can be totally hot. Let's not forget this.

    sdrawkcaB emaN on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    I see what you're getting at pants, but I don't know why you felt the need to jump in with the me-too-ism.

    The Cat on
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    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited August 2007
    Ah teenage reasoning.

    I'm still waiting for my monk-like moral rectitude to telekinetically pop girls' bras off like in a bad 80s movie.

    Jacobkosh on
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