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Nobody cares about your age.

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    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited August 2007
    Aemilius wrote: »
    Hey now. Sweaters can be totally hot. Let's not forget this.

    oh, I haven't, you may rest assured

    Jacobkosh on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    I see what you're getting at pants, but I don't know why you felt the need to jump in with the me-too-ism.

    the "male stare" complaint just bugs me some because of the double standard that i pointed out.


    personally i think any kind of staring is rude, along with asking things like age or weight or how much money someone makes. i wouldn't have a problem answering those questions myself, but i don't think it's unreasonable to realize that those might be touchy subjects for some people.

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Edgewood wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    i think a lot of women do dress for tht sort of attention, but also get offended when they attract that attention from people they didn't want it from (read: ugly people).

    And how is any of this confined to one gender?

    it isn't, but no one talks about the "female stare"

    i think there's the implication that guys should enjoy and welcome any attention that they get, cuz we're all sex obsessed horndogs

    That's always seemed like a weird stereotype to me. I remember once being practically offered sex by a female friend of mine, and after repeatedly declining, I was yelled at and accused of being completely asexual. She and some of her friends started acting like not taking her up on her offer meant I didn't like women. Strange, really.

    GQ had an article on that a few weeks ago or so.

    moniker on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    Well, wearing a codpiece would probably get you more attention than she'd get with a push-up bra. They just aren't quite as socially accepted...

    moniker on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    moniker wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    Well, wearing a codpiece would probably get you more attention than she'd get with a push-up bra. They just aren't quite as socially accepted...

    not YET they aren't. but a man can dream

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaze#Gaze_and_feminist_theory

    Loren Michael on
    a7iea7nzewtq.jpg
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaze#Gaze_and_feminist_theory

    oh, then in that context i don't.

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    There is an article already posted in this goddamn thread describing the theory! Fucking read the thread before posting in it!!

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    I don't think you know what the male gaze is :|

    i always figured it to be the thousand yard stare that guys sometimes give girls they think are hot.

    the contradiction is that girls get to pick and choose who offends them by doing that when they're looking for attention, whereas guys looking for attention are expected to take whatever they can get.

    There is an article already posted in this goddamn thread describing the theory! Fucking read the thread before posting in it!!

    look, i had heard the term "male gaze" a thousand times before in another context. you can cry about semantics all you want, but that doesn't make my point any less valid or relevant.

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    ÆthelredÆthelred Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    How the hell is it "semantics" to totally misunderstand what male gaze means?
    Quick anecdote: I recently had about a year-long relationship with a woman roughly ten years my senior. I say "roughly" because I never actually asked how old she was - every time I thought about this, I just said to myself "eh, doesn't really matter, besides, it seems kinda rude."

    At the time, I did not second-guess myself, but as I'm reading this thread it strikes me just how bizarre it is that I thought it might be rude to ask the woman I was having sex with how old she was.

    You went out with a woman for a year and never knew her age? That's really weird. :?

    Æthelred on
    pokes: 1505 8032 8399
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    AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I am exactly twenty years and 27 minutes old.

    Azio on
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    How the hell is it "semantics" to totally misunderstand what male gaze means?

    there are different meanings, so i don't think i "totally misunderstood" anything. and my overall point about perspective and media perception is still relevant. if the idea is that "male gaze" forces someone to view something from a sexualized straight male perspective, that's a good point, but you can't discount the media's presentation of how men are supposed to act in social situations, which has just as significant of an impact.

    the media's concept male gaze implies that that's all straight men want, and if it isn't, there's something wrong with the man. that's reflected in the GQ article that was posted.

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2007
    why is the male gaze a bad thing?

    ege02 on
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    monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    ege02 wrote: »
    why is the male gaze a bad thing?

    Because it's a fairly sociopathic view towards the world. Everyone else who isn't a straight male is a thing responding to the straight male's actions rather than being seen as a different perspective that's interacted with by other perspectives.

    moniker on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    look, i had heard the term "male gaze" a thousand times before in another context. you can cry about semantics all you want, but that doesn't make my point any less valid or relevant.

    No, its not semantics, its you weighing in with your big fucking mouth without stopping to figure out what the conversation is about. Just have the good grace to admit you fucked up instead of trying to dump the consequences of your laziness on someone else :x

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    Pants ManPants Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    look, i had heard the term "male gaze" a thousand times before in another context. you can cry about semantics all you want, but that doesn't make my point any less valid or relevant.

    No, its not semantics, its you weighing in with your big fucking mouth without stopping to figure out what the conversation is about. Just have the good grace to admit you fucked up instead of trying to dump the consequences of your laziness on someone else :x

    i fucked up, but my argument is still stands. if i was just spewing random crap, that'd be one thing, but the point about the different connotations between the male gaze and the female gaze is still important.

    Pants Man on
    "okay byron, my grandma has a right to be happy, so i give you my blessing. just... don't get her pregnant. i don't need another mom."
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    FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    So, regarding age...

    I used to have an issue when people asked me my age. I wouldn't keep it a secret, but it did bother me. I've always looked and, apparently, acted older than my age - when I was in high school I'd visit an unfamiliar campus for a speech tournament and people would ask me if I were a new teacher, for instance. The gap between my real age and my perceived age is narrowing, slowly - I'm now 29 and I'm commonly mistaken for a 35-year-old whereas when I was 21 I was commonly mistaken for 30.

    However, I have noticed that when many people would ask my age, their attitude towards me would suddenly significantly change. A coworker might suddenly stop treating me with quite as much respect; a girl I was talking to at a party might suddenly lose interest while somebody else who overheard the conversation might suddenly gain interest; etc. Nobody likes to feel as though attitudes towards them are contingent upon their particular demographic categorization, whether the relevant characteristic is age or sex or race or religion. I recognize that to a certain degree it is unavoidable - being a different age does make you a different person, whether you like it or not - but it's still an unpleasant reminder that sometimes your personality and skills take a back seat to your census statistics.

    Feral on
    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    look, i had heard the term "male gaze" a thousand times before in another context. you can cry about semantics all you want, but that doesn't make my point any less valid or relevant.

    No, its not semantics, its you weighing in with your big fucking mouth without stopping to figure out what the conversation is about. Just have the good grace to admit you fucked up instead of trying to dump the consequences of your laziness on someone else :x

    i fucked up, but my argument is still stands. if i was just spewing random crap, that'd be one thing, but the point about the different connotations between the male gaze and the female gaze is still important.
    No, its not. Its really quite irrelevant that people think men love sex more than they do. You just can't stand to see a gender discussion go by without a "but what about the menz" thrown in, regardless of relevance :roll:

    anyway. I'm happy to give my age, but feel slightly odd handing people a learner's licence as ID at age 23. I feel like I should have got that part of my life organised by now...

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Feral wrote: »
    So, regarding age...

    I used to have an issue when people asked me my age. I wouldn't keep it a secret, but it did bother me. I've always looked and, apparently, acted older than my age - when I was in high school I'd visit an unfamiliar campus for a speech tournament and people would ask me if I were a new teacher, for instance. The gap between my real age and my perceived age is narrowing, slowly - I'm now 29 and I'm commonly mistaken for a 35-year-old whereas when I was 21 I was commonly mistaken for 30.

    However, I have noticed that when many people would ask my age, their attitude towards me would suddenly significantly change. A coworker might suddenly stop treating me with quite as much respect; a girl I was talking to at a party might suddenly lose interest while somebody else who overheard the conversation might suddenly gain interest; etc. Nobody likes to feel as though attitudes towards them are contingent upon their particular demographic categorization, whether the relevant characteristic is age or sex or race or religion. I recognize that to a certain degree it is unavoidable - being a different age does make you a different person, whether you like it or not - but it's still an unpleasant reminder that sometimes your personality and skills take a back seat to your census statistics.

    You're 29? This...changes everything :P

    electricitylikesme on
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    The Black HunterThe Black Hunter The key is a minimum of compromise, and a simple, unimpeachable reason to existRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I have decided that If i ever serve a really funny olf lady eggs, I'll tell her "Now no throwing that at peoples houses, I know how rambuncious you young ladies can be!"

    The Black Hunter on
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    poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pants Man wrote: »
    look, i had heard the term "male gaze" a thousand times before in another context. you can cry about semantics all you want, but that doesn't make my point any less valid or relevant.

    No, its not semantics, its you weighing in with your big fucking mouth without stopping to figure out what the conversation is about. Just have the good grace to admit you fucked up instead of trying to dump the consequences of your laziness on someone else :x

    i fucked up, but my argument is still stands. if i was just spewing random crap, that'd be one thing, but the point about the different connotations between the male gaze and the female gaze is still important.
    No, its not. Its really quite irrelevant that people think men love sex more than they do. You just can't stand to see a gender discussion go by without a "but what about the menz" thrown in, regardless of relevance :roll:

    anyway. I'm happy to give my age, but feel slightly odd handing people a learner's licence as ID at age 23. I feel like I should have got that part of my life organised by now...

    I'm 37 and I don't have a license. I have a bicycle and easy access to the finest public transportation system in the world, so it never bothers me.

    poshniallo on
    I figure I could take a bear.
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    Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I would love to grow old in Taiwan or Shanghai without a car.

    Loren Michael on
    a7iea7nzewtq.jpg
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    FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    You're 29? This...changes everything :P

    I'll get you, elm!

    Feral on
    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
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    SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    CangoFett wrote: »
    You can fly anywhere in the US you want without ID, I believe. Though Ive only flown like once, and at the expense of my parents.

    However, with the RealID act, you will need to show your papers to even drive across state lines.

    If the RealID act passes, I will be one step closer to moving to Svalbard.

    This is waaaay late, but the act already passed, it's just not funded(or the funding supplied is a joke) and states don't have to have it fully rolled out until 2013 I believe.

    It seems to me that the biggest issue, for general social situations where the question arises, is how the age question relates to appearance, and the question being forbidden is vastly weighted towards women. I can't think of why it would be private information, without the appearance component, and also why it doesn't seem to be an issue before about age 30. I'd consider asking someone's weight to be much worse, as that more close correlates to appearance, and is of much less interest to the person asking the question than age is. If anything, I think I might personally prefer people to know my age, as people often mistake me for looking younger, and if they're gonna treat me differently based on my age, I'd rather them know my correct age.

    Septus on
    PSN: Kurahoshi1
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    vylovylo Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Man, I would care less about telling my age as I got older, in fact I would make a point of telling people, maybe put it in my sig.

    "yeah that's right I'm 102, listen to me, because I'm old".

    Remember being old legitimates everything, even defecating yourself in public.

    vylo on
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    Vrtra TheoryVrtra Theory Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Septus wrote: »
    If anything, I think I might personally prefer people to know my age, as people often mistake me for looking younger, and if they're gonna treat me differently based on my age, I'd rather them know my correct age.

    I'd say your opinion is based on what you're attempting to do, though. If you're 25, but look 19, then of course you'd prefer the people you're at the bar with and the people in your business meeting to know you're 25. If you were 32 and looked 25, though, you'd probably prefer the people at the frat party or those chicks you were hitting on last College Night to continue thinking you're 25.

    Vrtra Theory on
    Are you a Software Engineer living in Seattle? HBO is hiring, message me.
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    SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I can't see myself wanting to hook up with random chicks to bang at any point in my life, and no other situation comes to mind where I'd be too old and out of place if I looked my age.

    Septus on
    PSN: Kurahoshi1
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    monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    poshniallo wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    anyway. I'm happy to give my age, but feel slightly odd handing people a learner's licence as ID at age 23. I feel like I should have got that part of my life organised by now...

    I'm 37 and I don't have a license. I have a bicycle and easy access to the finest public transportation system in the world, so it never bothers me.

    You live in Curitiba, Brazil?

    moniker on
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    ÆthelredÆthelred Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I would love to grow old in Taiwan or Shanghai without a car.

    Sadly the days of cycling China are very quickly disappearing. Having a car is something to aspire to there.

    Æthelred on
    pokes: 1505 8032 8399
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    monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I would love to grow old in Taiwan or Shanghai without a car.

    Sadly the days of cycling China are very quickly disappearing. Having a car is something to aspire to there.

    All of those bikes were just as big a problem to the city and urban fabric as the ubiquitousness of cars are to our cities. Worse, actually. You need to find a balance between all forms of mass, public, and private transportation.

    moniker on
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    GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I found it interesting, working for a section of Duke University this summer, we were going through an interview process with several candidates. The interviews were group interviews by the whole staff so I got to sit in for them but everyone was warned of a variety of questions that should not be asked of the candidate to avoid any possibility of a discrimination lawsuit. Among these was age as well as sexual preference and even how long the candidate would be living in the area.

    Gafoto on
    sierracrest.jpg
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    Muse Among MenMuse Among Men Suburban Bunny Princess? Its time for a new shtick Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Pardon me if someone has already said something similar:

    I feel people are reluctant to reveal their age, because part of the 'grandeur' of the internet is how it can bring down such barriers and connect people regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, background, etc. etc. etc . . . In real life, casually chatting with someone older or younger can raise eyebrows and suspicions, no matter how innocent. Or people feel that someone outside the age-group will have nothing in common with them. As such, IRL, people band with people near their age. Yes, mentally a person can hold their own against some time-jaded group, but that whole 'first-impression' thing tends to prevent such things unless your appearance is no longer an indicator of your age and one is more easily accepted because you look like a peer. To ask something such as age is like bringing those barriers up again. Personally, I've always held that reluctance, because when no one knew my age, I wouldn't be questioned as much. When it was known, people would go on guard or not take me as seriously.

    Muse Among Men on
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    JamesKeenanJamesKeenan Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I always figured people avoided giving their age to avoid the negative connotations. The general worldly consensus is that until you hit 25, and sometimes even later, you really don't know shit. Many ideas you hold dear you will let go of as you get older. That's the thought, so with that in mind, whatever you say can be brushed off of the ramblings of a child. In my quite limited experience, as I'm only 19, it seems to me that most older individuals who understand technology are more willing to give out their age due to sheer modesty. They mostly don't care what you think, they've grown up, and it doesn't affect them as much. Older individuals who don't understand technology probably feel the same way, but are afraid of giving any personal information out for fear of identity theft or something. I recognize that those lone undeveloped two stereotypes are infinitesimal in comparison to the broad spectrum of human motives and thoughts, however those seem to be the biggest two drivers concerning age relinquishment.

    What with society increasing this artificial stage of "adolescence" and the advent and prevalence of technology, more kids, staying kids for longer periods of time, hanging around on the internet all day. No one likes to hear that they are just being a kid, and no one wants to have their words judged as the words of a kid. I'm 19, and I still refer to myself and all my peers as kids.

    Personally, I'd like the smack the shit out of a lot of people I know in real life because they give my age group a bad name. They carry around this sense of ... entitlement, that they deserve something because they want it. Case in point? Remember that kid who bitched out the bus driver and the bus driver was wrangling him down by the neck. He deserved it. I wanted to hit the kid myself, he was being obnoxious, thoughtless and disrespectful.

    However, I also believe that's just this country (U.S.A) alone. The "the customer is aways right" attitude is ruining people's basic respect for other human beings.

    JamesKeenan on
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    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    In the US, at least, immense parts of society are oriented around age, both in culture and in law, so it's entirely natural for it to be a big deal, and anyone who stands to suffer from a big deal will guard it as best they can.

    I mean, here, let's just try to throw a small list together:

    What Age Means in Culture:

    - Health (how long until you're starting every day with a hand full of pills?)

    - Longevity of Appearance (how much longer do you have until your gray hair and wrinkles?)

    - Education/Knowledge (ignorance is irritating+"Maturity")

    - Expected Life Stages (wait, what? 40 and still no kids? must be freakz)

    - 1/2+7. (Which is ALLLLL over this forum)

    What Age Means in Law:

    - Driving (Permit, Self-Driving, Others-Driving)

    - Smoking

    - Drinking (many places you cannot be in the same ROOM as drinking, like in dorms)

    - Clubbing (you cannot walk in to the fucking building to dance)

    - Pr0n (making and watching)

    - Legal Adulthood (rather than your parents' pet)

    - Myriad licenses

    - Age of Consent (this one is a major issue, especially for anyone caught up in "Maturity" cravings)

    - Health Care (lol senior discount)

    - Travel

    - Jobs

    - Media Access (Aside from pr0n)

    - Ability to take office (lol President Dougie Howser)

    --

    Age is a fucking huge deal, which people have no control over whatsoever. So all they can do is try to control what you THINK their age is.

    Incenjucar on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Pardon me if someone has already said something similar:

    I feel people are reluctant to reveal their age, because part of the 'grandeur' of the internet is how it can bring down such barriers and connect people regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, background, etc. etc. etc . . . In real life, casually chatting with someone older or younger can raise eyebrows and suspicions, no matter how innocent. Or people feel that someone outside the age-group will have nothing in common with them. As such, IRL, people band with people near their age. Yes, mentally a person can hold their own against some time-jaded group, but that whole 'first-impression' thing tends to prevent such things unless your appearance is no longer an indicator of your age and one is more easily accepted because you look like a peer. To ask something such as age is like bringing those barriers up again. Personally, I've always held that reluctance, because when no one knew my age, I wouldn't be questioned as much. When it was known, people would go on guard or not take me as seriously.

    This is true. I used to post on a few usenet boards when i was 16-17 or so, and got taken a lot more seriously when people didn't know my age. Its a similar effect to being a known female, being out as very young in a serious environment. As in, you get a little more authority in a few select topics so long as you don't say anything too radical, but on everything else you get dismissed a lot more. I can definitely understand staying anonymous on both axes, I kind of wish I hadn't blown it here. Its really not worth being able to post more freely in the goddamn fashion thread :|

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Pardon me if someone has already said something similar:

    I feel people are reluctant to reveal their age, because part of the 'grandeur' of the internet is how it can bring down such barriers and connect people regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, background, etc. etc. etc . . . In real life, casually chatting with someone older or younger can raise eyebrows and suspicions, no matter how innocent. Or people feel that someone outside the age-group will have nothing in common with them. As such, IRL, people band with people near their age. Yes, mentally a person can hold their own against some time-jaded group, but that whole 'first-impression' thing tends to prevent such things unless your appearance is no longer an indicator of your age and one is more easily accepted because you look like a peer. To ask something such as age is like bringing those barriers up again. Personally, I've always held that reluctance, because when no one knew my age, I wouldn't be questioned as much. When it was known, people would go on guard or not take me as seriously.

    This is true. I used to post on a few usenet boards when i was 16-17 or so, and got taken a lot more seriously when people didn't know my age. Its a similar effect to being a known female, being out as very young in a serious environment. As in, you get a little more authority in a few select topics so long as you don't say anything too radical, but on everything else you get dismissed a lot more. I can definitely understand staying anonymous on both axes, I kind of wish I hadn't blown it here. Its really not worth being able to post more freely in the goddamn fashion thread :|
    If people didn't know you were female though, how would we get hilarious and depressing threads and PMs to laugh about in [chat]?

    electricitylikesme on
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    monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    However, I also believe that's just this country (U.S.A) alone. The "the customer is aways right" attitude is ruining people's basic respect for other human beings.

    You haven't gone out much, have you?

    moniker on
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    JohannenJohannen Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I don't care about your age unless you're under 18 and in a coffee house, or under 16 and in a nice restaurant. Either of those and you should be ashamed of yourself.

    Johannen on
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