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Computer won't turn on

icebergiceberg Registered User regular
edited August 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Hello,

I come here seeking your infinite wisdom and aid. My computer wasn't working before and i was told it was either my processor or motherboard. Seeing as I needed to upgrade anyway, I upgraded both. The problem is that the computer still does not work. It IS different now though.

Prior to the upgrade, the system would turn on and stay running (all fans and whatnot) but no video would show. Now, it won't even turn on. When I press the power button, the case lights/fans flicker on once and the fans rotate a little before stopping. All fans including CPU and video card spin. The other little tid bit is that there is a green LED by the power switch that turns on and stays on while it's powered even after the fans and lights stop.

Am I missing something here? I reseated the RAM to no effect. Is my PSU done for?

Thank you.

iceberg on

Posts

  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    edited August 2007
    My old desktop did something similar when it was shorting out. The PSU was shutting itself down when it detected the fault to prevent system damage.

    My suggestion: Get a proven power supply and strip your computer down to basic components: MB, Processor, RAM and video. Plug it into the new/proven power supply and see if it comes on. If it does, shut it down, plug in one more thing and turn it back on. Keep going until you find which piece of hardware is causing the problem.

    Alternatively, take the proc and MB out and buy an entirely new system. :P

    Nova_C on
  • Uncle LongUncle Long Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I would look over all of my power connections very carefully, you may have missed something when installing the new board. That being said, there is always the chance that you inadvertently ESD'd your new board with your old and bad PSU.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that this sounds like a PSU issue. Somewhere along the line power isn't getting where it needs to go the way it is supposed to get there.

    As was suggested, try stripping things down to the basics and slowly add hardware. Try swapping out the possibly bad PSU for a known good PSU.

    Also, is it just me or does it happen that a lot of times when a tech guy doesn't know what is wrong with a computer they default to "broken motherboard/cpu?"

    Uncle Long on
  • icebergiceberg Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Well, I invested in a new power supply... the results being... no change.

    I tried reverting it down to the bare essentials and its the same behavior. I must be missing something. Does anyone have any idea what could be going on here?

    iceberg on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Bad RAM?

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • Enos316Enos316 Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Edit: Read the problem wrong

    Make sure there aren't any wires touching the mobo, might be grounding it. If it is RAM and you remove it all, you should at least get an error message.

    I would start by removing all extra hardware not required for a bootup and see what happens (HD, RAM, CD-ROM, mouse, etc). Then see if it stays on.

    Enos316 on

    Enos.jpg
  • FantasyrogueFantasyrogue Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    This may be a stupid comment, but you did use the spacers for the motherboard right?

    Fantasyrogue on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    This may be a stupid comment, but you did use the spacers for the motherboard right?

    Do you mean standoffs, or jumpers? Both of those are good questions :D

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • whuppinswhuppins Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I'm sure he means standoffs, which (to the OP now) are the little things that you screw into the case that you attach the motherboard to. In other words, you don't screw the motherboard directly onto the case (oh dear god no), you use the spacers to create just, like, a half inch of space between the bottom of the mobo and the case.

    whuppins on
  • icebergiceberg Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Alright, so I tried to run it without even RAM in it and I get the same results.

    Yes, the standoffs are in place just as they were with the previous motherboard. There are no wires touching the motherboard.

    I just don't get what it could be. The only thing left in my head is that the new motherboard I got was defective.

    http://www.newegg.com/product/product.asp?item=N82E16813157107

    There were a few reviews of their boards being DOA. Perhaps I was cursed by the bad luck these other unfortunate souls were?

    iceberg on
  • Uncle LongUncle Long Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    If the original problem was a bad PSU, then there is a good chance that it would have damaged the original Mobo and processor. If you installed a new mobo and processor with the same bad power supply in place then there is a good chance that they are now damaged too.

    If you can, you should try swapping out these parts with another PC that you know works. You've already reduced things down to the basics so chances are it is one of these basic components which is giving you the problem and your quest is that much shorter. When you get to the part that duplicates the error then chances are you've foun dthe problem.

    Uncle Long on
  • icebergiceberg Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I don't know if the original PSU was bad, though. See, the computer worked fine up until the original problem of the computer showing but with no video at all. The computer would have no problem staying powered, only it showed no bios or any boot screen or anything. I replaced the motherboard and processor and a completely different problem replaced it. I swapped the PSU and the new problem did not change.

    Theoretically, if the old PSU was the problem, and it ruined the mobo/processor or whatever, wouldn't a new PSU present a change even if it was still not working properly? Or since the old PSU fried the other components, a new PSU would not change anything?

    iceberg on
  • Uncle LongUncle Long Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    If the old psu was the problem and ruined your original components and it wasn't changed on the installation of your new components then there is a good chance that it damaged your new components as well. I am not saying that this is the case but it is a possibility. Like I said, if you have access to another PC then you should be able to swap one hardware component at a time until you figure out which one is giving you trouble so long as your and the other computer's components are compatible.

    Uncle Long on
  • SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    You kept the same posts, but changed the mobo; some of those placements are board specific. Double check to make sure everything has clearance. Most mobo's have a thin sheet of foam on the underside, check over yours to make sure nothing has been digging into it- sounds a heck of a lot like a short, and if you've swapped PSU's...

    Sarcastro on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Right, all mobos don't use the same standoffs. One of those'll short it before you can say "oh no, I'm about to short my mobo!"

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • icebergiceberg Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I guess I assumed the standoffs didn't matter since the new mobo didn't come with any new standoffs. There was some foam but I don't really gather anything significant out of it. Where do I get appropriate standoffs / How do I know they're the right ones? If that was the problem, is it screwed then and I should stop trying?

    iceberg on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Sorry, I phrased that badly. All mobos use the same standoffs, but in different configurations. You should use as many standoffs as your mobo has holes, no more, no less, and they should all line up exactly. If you messed up, you may have shorted the mobo, and you'll want a new one. Say it was broken when you bought it.

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • icebergiceberg Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Ahh.. I understand. I took a look at where my standoffs were in relation to the motherboard. There's 6 placed at about the corners and middle of the longer sides of the motherboard that I had lined up correctly. There are 4 additional that are around near where the processor would be that screwed into nothing, would these be the culprit perhaps? I wonder though, my last motherboard fit onto this same standoff configuration that includes the 4 extra around the processor but never had this problem. Would this mean that this wouldn't be the solution to the problem? If these 4 standoffs are what's screwed up, is the motherboard the only thing ruined?

    Thanks a lot for all your guys' help so far.

    iceberg on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Yes, if you have 4 standoffs under the motherboard that don't line up with holes in the motherboard, they might have shorted the board. If they didn't do it to your other board, it may just have been luck, the layout of the other board, its size, etc. Take those standoffs out and replace the motherboard (that's probably the only thing busted) and it ought to work.

    TychoCelchuuu on
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