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What Should I Look For in a Pyschiatrist?

WindbitWindbit Registered User regular
edited September 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
In my other threads, several of you have recommended that I see a psychiatrist. I went back to my former psychiatrist yesterday, but I feel like he did little to help me. When I mentioned to my mom about setting up another visit with him for me, she was against it. She told me that she didn't think there was anything else a psychiatrist could to do help me, and that I'll probably have to learn to live with my problems. Keep in mind that she is the same person who begged me to start seeing him again late last year.

I'll be moving into my college in 10 days, and I'm thinking about saving up my own money and finding another psychiatrist to go to in Atlanta. Does anyone have any suggestions what I should look for?

Windbit on

Posts

  • cfgausscfgauss Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Your college will probably have people there who are free / cheaper than average that you should look at.

    cfgauss on
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  • WindbitWindbit Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I'm going to an art school.

    BTW, I just talked to my current psychiatrist over the phone. He recommended word association: apparently, if you do enough of them you eventually begin to link words with positive thoughts instead of negative thoughts.

    Windbit on
  • brandotheninjamasterbrandotheninjamaster Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Atlanta is a big place I'm sure that there will be one somewhere. I don't think that you will have a big problem finding one once you get there. Unfortunately you may have to go through a few until you find the one thats for you. My advice would be to keep your head up and fight the good fight.

    P.S. I'm kinda late to the party. y did others suggest the psych. in the first place?

    brandotheninjamaster on
  • DynagripDynagrip Break me a million hearts HoustonRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2007
    Windbit wrote: »
    I'm going to an art school.

    BTW, I just talked to my current psychiatrist over the phone. He recommended word association: apparently, if you do enough of them you eventually begin to link words with positive thoughts instead of negative thoughts.
    That sounds like more of a pyschologist.

    Dynagrip on
  • witch_iewitch_ie Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Best thing to do looking in a new area - call around to a list of psychiatrists/psychologists that you can get from the net or your school, etc. Talk to each of them for a few minutes free of charge (most psychologists will do this, not sure about psychiatrists). See which one meshes with you (and your price range) best and go from there.

    witch_ie on
  • EtelmikEtelmik Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Make sure your psychologist has the same beliefs as you. If you believe very differently, they won't be much help.

    Example: some psychologists take the route of authority. Others try to help you come to your own conclusions.

    Psychiatrists is just like looking for a doctor. If it's a decent person, and they're not stupid, then he/she should be fine.

    Etelmik on
  • Uncle LongUncle Long Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Someone you can trust but not be intimidated by. You need to believe that they are able to help you and you need to be able to listen to their advice in a way which allows them to help you, not in the way that some do with their parents who may have their best interest in mind but don't know how to express that in a manner which allows their child to realize the wisdom in the knowledge as opposed to the over-bearing and independence crushing authoritarianism of a well-meaning parent.

    Uncle Long on
  • LewishamLewisham Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Windbit wrote: »
    I'll probably have to learn to live with my problems.

    This is bullshit. You're 18 years old, and you've had plenty of time to "get over" things, and yet you can't, like the whole "I LIKE FAT GIRLS AND WILL KILL THEM ZOMG" obsession.

    Just find a new one in Atlanta.

    Lewisham on
  • WagsWags Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    I haven't read any of your other posts, but from what I can gather in this topic, it sounds like you might benefit from the services of a counselling pyschologist.

    Learning to live with what ever problem it is is definately something that a counselling psychologist can you help you with. Heck, that's kind of a big part of their job description, way more so than a psychiatrist.

    What to look for? Someone you feel comfortable with and can trust is the basic. A bad counsellor-client fit will hamper things. If one doesn't feel right, you can ask for a referral to another. Perhaps there is a counselling centre of some sort in your city that can provide you more information?

    Wags on
    The gods certainly weren't role models in our sense, unless you wanted to model a Mount Olympus trailer park.
  • InvisibleInvisible Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    If I remember correctly, you were having anxiety issues?
    Try to find a psychologist that specializes in cognitive therapy. It really helped with my anxiety issues. It's still not completely cured, but now I have ways to cope with it that lower it. Do you see both a psychiatrist and psychologist? Or does your psychiatrist actually spend time discussing your problems?

    Invisible on
  • tybeettybeet Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    One who's not a pill-pusher. Reading through some of the comments it's apparent that most of you don't even know the difference between a psychiatrist and a psychologist. It's pretty simple, psychiatrists enter into the medical field to get an MD (and eventually PhD) which means they are medically certified to prescribe medications.

    This is why there's quite a lot of psychiatrists who do nothing but prescribe - and that's bad. Pills are only a stop-gap on the way to wellness and unless there is something seriously, genetically, unavoidably wrong with your neurological balance (usually not the case - don't assume it is) you will need counsel or some intense introspection to change things. That is where psychologists come in. Psychologists are trained in the art of therapy, and cannot prescribe medication.

    tybeet on
  • EtelmikEtelmik Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Psychologists are trained in the art of therapy, and cannot prescribe medication.

    Except in New Mexico, and maybe one day other states.

    The divide between the two is unfortunate--psychiatrists used to practice therapy, but the boom of the social sciences has made it so complex that one can spend 4 years in grad school and one or two doing one's residency and still only be able to practice psychotherapy, without having done much or any work in medicine. Now that we have so many psychologists and not enough people to license the drugs, the two have to work in tandem.

    See a psychologist first. They'll have a better idea if you need drugs or not. They'll refer you to a psychiatrist who will do nothing but get them for you, and have you call him for renewals or changes in prescription and that's it.

    Seriously, when I finally went to a psychiatrist after seeing a psychologist, it was a ten-minute appointment. Got my piece of paper and left, saw him once more so he could make sure they weren't screwing me up, and then left. It's messed up--you basically just have to say "I'd like some Prozac, I am t3h saddz0rz" and you get it.

    Etelmik on
  • FristleFristle Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    It hasn't been mentioned yet: insurance. Make sure she/he takes your insurance. If they do, make sure you jump through all the hoops in order for the claim to actually get approved. That might mean a referral or whatever from your general physician. Read all the fine print on your benefits forms. Health insurance seems to love to dick you around when it comes to mental health care.

    Fristle on
    Fristle.jpg
  • FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    edited September 2007
    tybeet wrote:
    Reading through some of the comments it's apparent that most of you don't even know the difference between a psychiatrist and a psychologist.

    Yeah, I think this needs to be clarified.
    Psychiatrist = medical doctor. Can prescribe medication. May or may not provide counseling.
    Psychologist = PhD who provides counseling. Cannot prescribe medication (except in New Mexico and the military).
    Therapist = Master's Degree who provides counseling. Cannot prescribe medication. May have any number of letters after their name (MSW, MFT, LCSW, etc.)

    Studies have shown no difference in the effectiveness of therapy between the three specialties. None is any better than the other.
    Invisible wrote: »
    Try to find a psychologist that specializes in cognitive therapy.

    Yup. A cognitive-behavioral approach has been shown to be the most effective for most common problems.

    Windbit: find somebody who has experience with your issues, who you can afford, who has an office that is convenient for you to get to, and who you get along with. Other than that, the important thing is that you go consistently. It's like the gym - where you go is less important than that you stick with it!

    Feral on
    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
  • FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    edited September 2007
    One additional thing...

    If payment or insurance is an issue, contact your university's health office. They may have therapists on staff (even if it is an art school). If that fails, try your local county government public health office. They can typically refer you to low-cost/no-cost therapists in the area.

    Feral on
    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
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