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Linux Thread - beta version 5 build 6200 alpha release 2

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    Moe FwackyMoe Fwacky Right Here, Right Now Drives a BuickModerator Mod Emeritus
    edited January 2008
    I hope they get a network manager out for KDE that matches the one for Gnome that supports PEAP so I can actually use it on my laptop here on campus.

    Moe Fwacky on
    E6LkoFK.png

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    BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    _______moe wrote: »
    I hope they get a network manager out for KDE that matches the one for Gnome that supports PEAP so I can actually use it on my laptop here on campus.

    I was looking through the KDE bug tracker and saw that it was added to the SVN repository back in September.

    EDIT: Here is the bug.

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
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    meatflowermeatflower Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    So this may or may not be a stupid question. Guess I'll find out.

    I recently purchased an 8GB USB 2.0 thumb drive. I was actually going to use it as a mobile WoW installation but it's just a hair too small, so I'm trying to come up with some other uses for it other than data transfer or temporary backups.

    I was thinking there might be a linux distro suited to running from a USB key. I guess this would be somewhere between a "live CD" and full distro since I can read and write to the key but it's still not big enough for a full fledged install of say...Ubuntu. Unless I'm under false assumptions on that last one.

    Could I just install Ubuntu on it or would there be issues? Is there a better alternative?

    meatflower on
    archer_sig-2.jpg
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    meatflower wrote: »
    So this may or may not be a stupid question. Guess I'll find out.

    I recently purchased an 8GB USB 2.0 thumb drive. I was actually going to use it as a mobile WoW installation but it's just a hair too small, so I'm trying to come up with some other uses for it other than data transfer or temporary backups.

    I was thinking there might be a linux distro suited to running from a USB key. I guess this would be somewhere between a "live CD" and full distro since I can read and write to the key but it's still not big enough for a full fledged install of say...Ubuntu. Unless I'm under false assumptions on that last one.

    Could I just install Ubuntu on it or would there be issues? Is there a better alternative?

    You can easily fit a full install of Ubuntu on an 8GB keychain.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Janin wrote: »
    meatflower wrote: »
    So this may or may not be a stupid question. Guess I'll find out.

    I recently purchased an 8GB USB 2.0 thumb drive. I was actually going to use it as a mobile WoW installation but it's just a hair too small, so I'm trying to come up with some other uses for it other than data transfer or temporary backups.

    I was thinking there might be a linux distro suited to running from a USB key. I guess this would be somewhere between a "live CD" and full distro since I can read and write to the key but it's still not big enough for a full fledged install of say...Ubuntu. Unless I'm under false assumptions on that last one.

    Could I just install Ubuntu on it or would there be issues? Is there a better alternative?

    You can easily fit a full install of Ubuntu on an 8GB keychain.

    I wouldn't be inclined to create a swap partition, though.

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
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    Monolithic_DomeMonolithic_Dome Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    You might have a bit better luck with a distro that's designed around fitting on small(er) media. Popular ones include Damn Small Linux and Puppy Linux

    I'm a big fan of Puppy linux myself. It'll boot a lot faster than a full version of Ubuntu and is designed around the purpose so there will be fewer read/writes to your USB drive. It comes with XFCE and a reasonably full suite of apps, too.

    Monolithic_Dome on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    SilvoculousSilvoculous Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I didn't know Puppy came with XFCE now. Looking into that right away. My preference was always DSL, but they're not all that different, as far as installing packages and preinstalled apps go.

    I love installing DSL on the shittiest computer I can get my hands on and watching it almost instantly become useful.

    Silvoculous on
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    Monolithic_DomeMonolithic_Dome Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Yeah scratch that. I had mixed up puppy and zenwalk, though either one would be perfectly suitable for an 8GB flash drive. Though I really do like XFCE.

    In fact, I actually remember what I liked about either one now. Puppy has the better package manager (apt-get), Zenwalk has xfce. (X)Ubuntu takes up more space, but takes up that space with more (generally) useful stuff.

    I think there's no wrong answers here. Pick a pony and see if it works.

    Monolithic_Dome on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    SilvoculousSilvoculous Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    And here you had my hopes up.

    Zenwalk, still, is made of win.

    Silvoculous on
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    meatflowermeatflower Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    The more I've thought about the whole thing I'm thinking I shouldn't even bother with putting it on the flash drive. I'm gonna go with an XP dual boot, for games obviously. That or I'll get a second computer to put in here.

    DSL sounds intriguing though, I've got my mom on an old AMD Duron 1Ghz with minimal RAM. It runs XP okay but really all she does is browse the web on it. I previously had it running as a MythTV box with Fedora.

    meatflower on
    archer_sig-2.jpg
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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    So I'm trying to install KnoppMyth on a spare computer to try it out.

    I probably shouldn't have tried to use very old hardware and a notoriously flaky TV Tuner card (though I haven't even got that far yet).

    I was going to try Mythbuntu, but it freaks out with a "Job control turned off" error (same with a vanilla feisty install disc) that is apparently solvable by using the alternate install disc, but there doesn't seem to be such a thing for Mythbuntu.

    KnoppMyth crapped out with BIOS errors until I updated it. I had to boot from a floppy to do that, when's the last time you even used a floppy disc? Then, apparently, it won't install unless the drives are connected exactly as it expects them to be. Took a bit of trial and error since I'm using a mobo with four IDE connectors.

    Next up is to try and get a picture out of the tuner, then if I'm feeling really adventurous/masochistic, I may try configuring the remote. I've pretty much resigned myself to the fact that I'll never get the TV-out to work properly without some serious voodoo.

    japan on
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    Recoil42Recoil42 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    meatflower wrote: »
    DSL sounds intriguing though, I've got my mom on an old AMD Duron 1Ghz with minimal RAM. It runs XP okay but really all she does is browse the web on it. I previously had it running as a MythTV box with Fedora.

    I have to say, I tried DSL, and it seems awful for anything other than a toy, or the most advanced of users. Your mom will be utterly lost. If you have the space, and judging from the proc speed you do, go for another distro.

    Xubuntu should work fine, even with very little ram, it uses XFCE, so it's much lighter on the system than GNOME/KDE... http://www.xubuntu.org/

    Recoil42 on
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    SilvoculousSilvoculous Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    That ought to be said, too - that DSL is for advanced users. Because it utilizes the smallest possible software in order to fit an entire OS into 50MB, not everything is going to have a fancy GUI, or even an intuitive one. Look at Ted, the word processor. And I opted out of even using emelfm; you're better off learning some basic command line material and then working entirely in xterm.

    DSL as a whole is a good learning tool for those who like to get their hands dirty. Don't run it on any PC that you can expect to rely on regularly.

    Silvoculous on
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    squirlysquirly Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Just how hard would it be to edit Gnome? Because, quite frankly, out of KDE, E17 and all the other window managers (Or whatever the hell they call themselves) it's generally the only one I remotely like but it still has horrible issues (PADDINGPADDINGPADDINGPADDING) and don't get me started on KDE (Even KDE4, hell, especially KDE4), it's a joke to look at..

    Or, how hard is it to make themes? Considering the million pathetic Vista rip-offs on gnome-look I can't imagine it being too hard.

    squirly on
    Diablo2 [US West; Ladder]: *DorianGraph [New/Main] *outsidewhale [Old]
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    Monolithic_DomeMonolithic_Dome Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Depending on what bothers you about GNOME, it might be easiest to just try XFCE. It's a bit more minimalist and it boots a lot faster.

    But creating styles isn't too tough. Open up a style and take a look at This page and you should be able to figure it out. It'd probably be easiest if you found a style that is close to what you want and modify it.

    Monolithic_Dome on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    Just how hard would it be to edit Gnome? Because, quite frankly, out of KDE, E17 and all the other window managers (Or whatever the hell they call themselves) it's generally the only one I remotely like but it still has horrible issues (PADDINGPADDINGPADDINGPADDING) and don't get me started on KDE (Even KDE4, hell, especially KDE4), it's a joke to look at..

    Or, how hard is it to make themes? Considering the million pathetic Vista rip-offs on gnome-look I can't imagine it being too hard.

    It's actually pretty easy. I was able to pull some things off the net and edit them to get the color scheme and look I wanted, and messing with fonts is pretty easy as well. And once you have Compiz if you can run it you can do even more.

    This is my GNOME desktop:

    desktop020520008001ts4.th.png

    It's similar to a Mac desktop, obviously, although not exactly... and it's not a real dock, just launchers with a script to bring forward instances of programs (that way I have a dock-like tool which works even without compositing), there's no visible taskbar, and everything is very uniform on my desktop. Also, I use Thunar instead of nautilus for browsing files because it's a much cleaner app, and still uses GTK+ so it fits with everything else.

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

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    squirlysquirly Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    squirly on
    Diablo2 [US West; Ladder]: *DorianGraph [New/Main] *outsidewhale [Old]
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    BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme?

    Metacity is the GNOME window manager, GTK+ is a widget toolkit. Metacity uses GTK+.

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    Metacity is the program that draws window frames. GTK+ is the library used to draw things like buttons and scroll bars. Either way, it's much easier to start with an existing theme and tweak it than try to create one from scratch.

    There's also GTK+ theme engines, which are *very* complicated and written in C. You probably don't need to create one of these, unless you want to get wild and crazy.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Janin wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    Metacity is the program that draws window frames. GTK+ is the library used to draw things like buttons and scroll bars. Either way, it's much easier to start with an existing theme and tweak it than try to create one from scratch.

    There's also GTK+ theme engines, which are *very* complicated and written in C. You probably don't need to create one of these, unless you want to get wild and crazy.

    Seems like wasted effort. All that can be done with themes. :\

    MKR on
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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    OK, so I can't seem to make KnoppMyth work.

    Going to try a different approach with Xubuntu and Freevo, since it seems to have more comprehensive and up to date documentation.

    japan on
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    Recoil42Recoil42 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Janin wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    Metacity is the program that draws window frames. GTK+ is the library used to draw things like buttons and scroll bars. Either way, it's much easier to start with an existing theme and tweak it than try to create one from scratch.

    There's also GTK+ theme engines, which are *very* complicated and written in C. You probably don't need to create one of these, unless you want to get wild and crazy.

    Wow, that's nice. Umm, how would one go about doing that, anyways?

    Recoil42 on
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Recoil42 wrote: »
    Janin wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    Metacity is the program that draws window frames. GTK+ is the library used to draw things like buttons and scroll bars. Either way, it's much easier to start with an existing theme and tweak it than try to create one from scratch.

    There's also GTK+ theme engines, which are *very* complicated and written in C. You probably don't need to create one of these, unless you want to get wild and crazy.

    Wow, that's nice. Umm, how would one go about doing that, anyways?

    If you want to create something like it, you'll need to learn C and write a theme engine. To run it, you need a window manager that does compositing (like Compiz, or the latest version of Metacity). Cimi has said he will release that above theme to the public as soon as somebody writes a configuration utility for it - apparently the author of the last one stopped updating it.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    MKR wrote: »
    Janin wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    Metacity is the program that draws window frames. GTK+ is the library used to draw things like buttons and scroll bars. Either way, it's much easier to start with an existing theme and tweak it than try to create one from scratch.

    There's also GTK+ theme engines, which are *very* complicated and written in C. You probably don't need to create one of these, unless you want to get wild and crazy.

    Seems like wasted effort. All that can be done with themes. :\

    That was my thought. I didn't see anything that couldn't be accomplished by some mixing and matching themes and setting compiz to display windows transparently.

    Edit: Also, if you want to get crazy there's ways to do it all in Python as well.

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

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    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    MKR wrote: »
    Janin wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    Awesome, thanks you 2, especially for that link Monolithic_Dome. Both Thunar and XFCE don't look too shabby, I'll try 'em out.

    What's the difference between a GTK and Metacity theme? Is there one which is preferable to use? I had a quick look at the 2 tutorials at that link and Metacity seems a lot more obvious/easy for me to try out, but GTK seems like a more popular thing on Linux.. D: Oh, and I realllly like the theme that's used as an example on the Metycity page.

    Metacity is the program that draws window frames. GTK+ is the library used to draw things like buttons and scroll bars. Either way, it's much easier to start with an existing theme and tweak it than try to create one from scratch.

    There's also GTK+ theme engines, which are *very* complicated and written in C. You probably don't need to create one of these, unless you want to get wild and crazy.

    Seems like wasted effort. All that can be done with themes. :\

    That was my thought. I didn't see anything that couldn't be accomplished by some mixing and matching themes and setting compiz to display windows transparently.

    Edit: Also, if you want to get crazy there's ways to do it all in Python as well.

    Look again. Compiz doesn't know what bits on the inside of the window to make transparent and which bits to leave opaque unless the theme engine tells it which is which. Glass-like toolbars (for instance) need a custom theme engine.

    Daedalus on
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    WeretacoWeretaco Cubicle Gangster Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    So i finally got around to doing another linux install yesterday.

    Xubuntu on my latitude D630. So far it's pretty good. Just having the same issues I always have to deal with (audio audio audio). Stupid intel HD audio doesn't work right with my docking station. I think i can survive for a while on it until 8.04 comes out and we get better santa rosa support.

    I'm liking the lightweight XFCE for a WM too, just have to do some work to make it a bit prettier and I'm g2g.

    Weretaco on
    Unofficial PA IRC chat: #paforums at irc.slashnet.org
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    urahonkyurahonky Cynical Old Man Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    So you Linux beasts, I have a question.

    When I open the man page for rm, at the top it says "rm(1)" what the hell is the 1 for?

    urahonky on
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    typhoontyphoon Registered User regular
    edited October 2021
    .

    typhoon on
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    urahonkyurahonky Cynical Old Man Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    You're a saint. Thanks typhoon!

    urahonky on
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    MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Is there anyway to grant myself admin rights in Ubuntu other than using the CLI? I'm proficient enough with it, but it reminds me of work too much and I'm laaaaaazy.

    Malkor on
    14271f3c-c765-4e74-92b1-49d7612675f2.jpg
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Malkor wrote: »
    Is there anyway to grant myself admin rights in Ubuntu other than using the CLI? I'm proficient enough with it, but it reminds me of work too much and I'm laaaaaazy.

    Alt-F2 to open the run program dialog, use "gksu <program name here>". Ubuntu disables the admin account (IMO a very good idea), and if you know enough about Linux to need it you know how to activate it.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    LittleBootsLittleBoots Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    So, I'm trying to install Kubuntu 7.10 and its not going well. I've installed Kubuntu before but it was dapper drake and it went fine. This time I want to try gusty and its not going so well. I'll explain:

    I downloaded the 7.10 x86 Live DVD. I boot from said DVD and get a list of options. If I try either the "Start or Install Kubuntu" or the "Start or Install Kubuntu in safe graphics mode" I get taken to a loading screen that sits there for a long time (10 minutes or so) before going to a black screen with a blinking cursor and nothing happens, ever.. I just have to reboot. I've also tried the "install in text mode" or what ever and that goes well until it gets to the "Select and Install Software" step in which it gets to 6% and errors out. No specific error, just says that it has failed.

    So My question is, does anyone know of any boot options that I might be able to try in order to get this live cd to start properly?

    System Specs:
    Nforce4 based mobo
    Nvidia 7800GT
    2gigs RAM
    4000+ AMD64

    LittleBoots on

    Tofu wrote: Here be Littleboots, destroyer of threads and master of drunkposting.
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    MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Did you try the alternative disc?

    Also just making sure it's a clean install...

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

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    MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Janin wrote: »
    Malkor wrote: »
    Is there anyway to grant myself admin rights in Ubuntu other than using the CLI? I'm proficient enough with it, but it reminds me of work too much and I'm laaaaaazy.

    Alt-F2 to open the run program dialog, use "gksu <program name here>". Ubuntu disables the admin account (IMO a very good idea), and if you know enough about Linux to need it you know how to activate it.

    Thank you kindly. I gotta change some things in the X-server so I can use my mouse's other buttons.

    Malkor on
    14271f3c-c765-4e74-92b1-49d7612675f2.jpg
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    WeretacoWeretaco Cubicle Gangster Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    So I think I've finally got a linux install working nicely for me.

    installed kubuntu-desktop today because i can't deal with thunar in xfce (no network browsing wtf :P )

    My wired/wireless connections are going good from work to home (had to figure out how to prepend nameservers because my DHCP at home overrides /etc/resov.conf)

    Audio is working good for the most part (got analog line level from the dockign station, no digital liek I prefer but whatever)

    Just have to strip down the KDE menu and I'm a happy camper, haven't booted into vista in 4 days now.

    Weretaco on
    Unofficial PA IRC chat: #paforums at irc.slashnet.org
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    MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    On network browsing:

    Just mount the network shares as folders.

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

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    WeretacoWeretaco Cubicle Gangster Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    On network browsing:

    Just mount the network shares as folders.

    bah.. i prefer KDE anyways :)

    Weretaco on
    Unofficial PA IRC chat: #paforums at irc.slashnet.org
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    SilvoculousSilvoculous Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I downloaded the 7.10 x86 Live DVD. I boot from said DVD and get a list of options. If I try either the "Start or Install Kubuntu" or the "Start or Install Kubuntu in safe graphics mode" I get taken to a loading screen that sits there for a long time (10 minutes or so) before going to a black screen with a blinking cursor and nothing happens, ever.. I just have to reboot. I've also tried the "install in text mode" or what ever and that goes well until it gets to the "Select and Install Software" step in which it gets to 6% and errors out. No specific error, just says that it has failed.

    I'd like an explanation for this too, as it happens with a lot of the PCs I try to boot Ubuntu on. Right now my only solution is to try different Live CDs until one works.

    Silvoculous on
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    MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Have you verified the discs?

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

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    WeretacoWeretaco Cubicle Gangster Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    So this is kind of amusing.

    People are always bitching that vista is such a resource hog.. then i see how poorly compiz runs for me compared to the vista desktop stuff :)

    I wonder if there is a newer nvidia driver i can install than is available from the auto update stuff.

    Weretaco on
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