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Kitten Thread Duce [UPDATE: PICTURES]

RhinoRhino TheRhinLOLRegistered User regular
edited November 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Original thread (about safety) is here:
http://forums.penny-arcade.com/showthread.php?t=40311

(once I have them, I'll post pictures).

Couple more (non-safety/health) related questions:

Were should I put their littler pan? The bathroom here has a high humidity and don't want to put it in the kitchen either (don't want to smell kitten poop while I'm eating). Last winter I had a lot of mice and rats in my kitchen [hence getting the kittens before it gets cold out]... my friend says that spraying cat urine in your house keeps the mice away? I don't want to spray urine all on my kitchen, but if I kept the litter box there it would keep the mice and rats out?


What are some good names? I'm getting two female kittens... my female friend wants to name them "Sugar" and "Spice"... I want to name them Andariel and Lilith - but not sure yet. Since I'm getting them together I want to give them names that "fit" well with each other. The other option is to have my lady friend name one and I could name the other, but then they would be named "Princess Butterscotch" and "DeathStrike" - I think that's kind of funny because people would know who named which cat without asking, but open to other suggestions.


My neighbor lets out their cat all the time; it's really friendly. The thing is though, we live on a fairly busy street and just thought cats would get hit by cars and stuff if we left them out? Why doesn't their cat get hit by cars all the time? It's ok if I just let them run around the neighborhood?


Besides a litter box, litter and food is there anything else I need to keep these kittens happy and in good health? I'm just going to take them to a vet and tell him to do whatever they normally do to kittens there (shots, worms, ear mites, etc). I'm going to get them a scratching post??

Do I need a license for them? I knew this guy and he had lots of pit bulls in his basement and got in trouble for them and the city took them away because he didn't have licenses and papers for them.

When I pick up these kittens do I need to get a recipe or transfer or ownership or anything?

Also what do I do when I go to work? I don't want to come home and find one of them dead.

How do I keep them from getting really fat and lazy? I don't want a chubby cat.

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Rhino on
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    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Because I'm lazy I can't be fucked with quotes and will just do bolding for your questions

    Were should I put their littler pan? The bathroom here has a high humidity and don't want to put it in the kitchen either (don't want to smell kitten poop while I'm eating). Last winter I had a lot of mice and rats in my kitchen [hence getting the kittens before it gets cold out]... my friend says that spraying cat urine in your house keeps the mice away? I don't want to spray urine all on my kitchen, but if I kept the litter box there it would keep the mice and rats out?

    Most people put it in the laundry as you don't walk there too often if it does smell, otherwise I'd do the bathroom as it will be easy to clean.


    What are some good names? I'm getting two female kittens... my female friend wants to name them "Sugar" and "Spice"... I want to name them Andariel and Lilith - but not sure yet. Since I'm getting them together I want to give them names that "fit" well with each other. The other option is to have my lady friend name one and I could name the other, but then they would be named "Princess Butterscotch" and "DeathStrike" - I think that's kind of funny because people would know who named which cat without asking, but open to other suggestions.

    I've always wanted Batman and Robin. Though a guy at work made an awesome suggestion a month ago of Buth Cassidy and the Sundance Kid


    My neighbor lets out their cat all the time; it's really friendly. The thing is though, we live on a fairly busy street and just thought cats would get hit by cars and stuff if we left them out? Why doesn't their cat get hit by cars all the time? It's ok if I just let them run around the neighborhood?

    Really this is personal choice, my parents have always let our cats roam free. Cars are a danger yes, but it's a danger to us as well and we don't spend all day indoors either. Cats while being domesticated do like to run around and explore if they are smart they will realise that cars = bad.

    Besides a litter box, litter and food is there anything else I need to keep these kittens happy and in good health? I'm just going to take them to a vet and tell him to do whatever they normally do to kittens there (shots, worms, ear mites, etc). I'm going to get them a scratching post??

    Scratching posts are good as are things on a string on a stick, laser pointers are fun too they are never catch them. It really depends on the kitten, one of my parents if you fold a 10 dollars note in half (no other currency does it for him he doesn't mind c-notes but really he just like tenners) he will go nuts playing with it.

    Do I need a license for them? I knew this guy and he had lots of pit bulls in his basement and got in trouble for them and the city took them away because he didn't have licenses and papers for them.

    Most places no, you may need to get them chipped though, call your local council and ask

    When I pick up these kittens do I need to get a recipe or transfer or ownership or anything?

    Not necesary though if they are purebred they will supply you with the certificates


    Also what do I do when I go to work? I don't want to come home and find one of them dead.


    I recomend you do your work, as long as you don't go to work with poisons lying on the floor and knives balanced in precarious positions you should be ok. Don't be suprised if they knock shit over while you are gone though.



    How do I keep them from getting really fat and lazy? I don't want a chubby cat.

    Play with them and don't over feed them, keep in mind as they are young they are crazy and they get over they will be more sedate, cats only get fat really from over feeding.

    Blake T on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    thanks for the reply.

    They are both female, so boy names won't work.

    I just let them out by the street and they automatically learn how not to get hit? Do I need to push them out there in the street a bit so they can hear and get scared of the cars?

    What is "Chipped"? I want to chip them good?

    They aren't pure breed, they are just 'farm cats'.

    How much should I feed them?

    Rhino on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Don't let them out. The exact number changes with the sources, but outdoor cats are generally thought to live less than half as long as indoor-only cats on average. Everyone claims their cat went outside and lived to eleventy-billion years old, but the numbers disagree, and the amount of cat-pizza on most roads is pretty eloquent. Sure, some cats can avoid getting hit by cars most of the time, but you still have to worry about FIV (cat AIDS), feline leukemia, fights with other cats and feral dogs, people who shoot cats for digging up their gardens, crazy kids, etc. Plus, do you want to have to worry every time you drive past a mashed bit of fur on the road that you're seeing the remains of your kitty? If you're getting kittens, they can live a very happy and fulfilled life inside.

    You most likely don't need a license; you should get them microchipped, though, in case they ever get outside accidentally. The guy you know probably got in trouble for either breeding dogs (which does require a license in a lot of places) or fighting his pits, which is of course totally illegal. Two spayed kitties are probably not an issue.

    The litter box shouldn't stink if you're cleaning it out every day. It only takes a couple minutes; just work it into your routine. Don't put it somewhere you're walking all the time; cats like to be left alone to do their business, and the last thing you want if for them to get spooked while pooping and decide not to use the litter box anymore.

    Get a scratching post and teach your cats to use it. If you see them scratching somewhere else, pick them up and put their paws on the post. Catproof your place a little by putting away chemicals and lose cords; they should be okay by themselves, but don't leave them alone too much. If they get destructive while you're gone, you can lock them in the bathroom with food, water, and a litter tray. Cats mostly sleep all day anyway, so make sure you play with them a lot when you're home and wear them out.

    Playing with them will also keep them from getting fat, as will not giving them tons of treats and keeping them on a measured amount of good-quality cat food (kitten food until they reach a year old). To find out if a food is good quality, look at the first 5 ingredients. The more meat in there, the better; cats are obligate carnivores and cannot digest grains, especially corn. Byproducts are also bad news. Nutro and Blue Buffalo are both high-quality foods that can be found at Petsmart. These foods are more expensive-looking, but you don't have to feed as much volume, so they work out to about the same price as cheap, shitty foods like Whiskas or Pedigree.

    Trowizilla on
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    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    If they are farm cats they may not be used to cars so try while holding them take them out to the road, if they start trying to claw your face off trying to get away they are scared of cars, like I said though it's still a risk and they could get hit.

    The other problem is that your neighbours cat may not like new kittens moving in on his/her turf and may rough them up a bit so be carefull with that too.

    Chipping is sticking a microchip in their neck so they become part of the machine. Bassically if they get lost someone will find them and take them into a vet and they will read the chip and your name and number will show up so they can contact you.

    As for the food just watch them it's hard to tell how much is enough just from the internet, stick some food in the bowl let them eat it, just don't just top it up during the day. If they start getting fat then you are feeding them too much, remember they are kittens and they need to grow as well.

    Blake T on
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    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Trowizilla wrote: »
    Don't let them out. The exact number changes with the sources, but outdoor cats are generally thought to live less than half as long as indoor-only cats on average. Everyone claims their cat went outside and lived to eleventy-billion years old, but the numbers disagree, and the amount of cat-pizza on most roads is pretty eloquent. Sure, some cats can avoid getting hit by cars most of the time, but you still have to worry about FIV (cat AIDS), feline leukemia, fights with other cats and feral dogs, people who shoot cats for digging up their gardens, crazy kids, etc. Plus, do you want to have to worry every time you drive past a mashed bit of fur on the road that you're seeing the remains of your kitty? If you're getting kittens, they can live a very happy and fulfilled life inside.

    Seriously I've known plenty of people with cats and only know one person who has had their kitten have run in with cars, yet I know more people that have had run in with cars.

    Like I said would you stick a person in a house for the rest of their life and call in fullfilling. I'm not going to argue this anymore. Like I said, it's a personal choice with risks involved but then so is life.

    Blake T on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    oh, like a rfid chip? I was just going to get them a collar and maybe affix my name and address to it. Is that ok instead?

    Can I just feed them raw meat instead, since they are meat eaters by nature? My sister's neighbor likes to cut up animals for fun and is always trying to give her big garbage bags full of fresh meat, can I just feed that to them? I think it's mostly made out of deer, rabbits and fish.

    Rhino on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I think I'm going to keep them in side for now. I live right on a busy street, my neighbor has a cat and my other neighbor has a big dog.

    When they get older I will put them in the street and see what happens. They are only kittens now and probably don't understand how cars work.

    Rhino on
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    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Yeah like an rfid chip.

    I honestly have no idea about the meat, I mean I used to give my cats a bit of meat as a treat occasionally but I'm not sure about a meal staple.

    Now days it's considered not too safe to get a collar than can't be torn easily (they may climb a tree fall off and hang themselves on a collar, so they made collars that break open if they get caught on stuff and pull too hard if that happens and they get lost they can't be identified.

    Blake T on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Blaket wrote: »
    Seriously I've known plenty of people with cats and only know one person who has had their kitten have run in with cars, yet I know more people that have had run in with cars.

    Like I said would you stick a person in a house for the rest of their life and call in fullfilling. I'm not going to argue this anymore. Like I said, it's a personal choice with risks involved but then so is life.

    Yeah, and cats don't have the ability to make logical decisions about those choices. You wouldn't let a little kid play in the street unsupervised, would you? (Now I'm worried that you would.) Yeah, you've maybe known a couple cat owners in your life, but guess what? Anecdote /= data, and the scientific data gives a much, much reduced lifespan for cats that go out. Cats are not naturally afraid of cars, cats get hit all the time, and you're totally ignoring all the other dangers of the outdoors. If a cat grew up outside and absolutely can't be happy indoors, yeah, you balance the risks with the happiness of the cat, but kittens can be easily acclimated to the indoors and it's an unneccessary risk to let them out.

    OP, as for food, if you want to do a raw diet, talk to the vet about it. They can't just eat steak all the time or anything, and wild-caught animals often have parasites. Kibble has feeding guidelines on the bag; just take how much they weigh and use the bag to figure out how much food they need. They need kitten food for the first year, then cat food.

    Trowizilla on
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    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Do you know what I was prepared to say my thing and let you say your thing but you seem convinced in just bringing it down by insulting me. I was going to just say it's your own choice rather than the other person rapes babies and you shouldn't believe what you say.

    Firstly cats are not naturally afraid of cars. Were the hell did you make that up from? Go start a car grab a kitten and walk near it. Try not to have it scratch your eyes out. My last "anectdotal cat" which apparently has no bearing on this discussion (though I wonder if my other anectdotal cats which lived a minimum of 15years do) would panic if it was in the general vicintiy of a car with the engine turned off, she wouldn't even go near the garage. She lived until she was 21 (but remember this and all other cats I know don't count! Or maybe they do and you can show me the cat that lived to 42). If you want to train your cat not to be scared of cars go ahead but if you want to kill them it will probably be quicker to train them to lick exposed power lines.

    Oh and cats /= humans (see I can do insulting math symbols too!) a child rare takes a loud noise as a warning clap your hands from a distance and the child will rarely register that as a noise of interest clap your hands from a distance for a cat and they will check it out.

    Saying it's alright to keep a cat indoors because it's an unnecessary risk is a stupid argument. It's unneccesary to drive a car when bikes and trains work wonderfully well but yet we do it anyway. Cats despite being domesticated are still predators deep down and love to explore. Most attitude problems (relating to keeping them up late at night meowing, peeing everywhere and generally being shitty) people have with cats are because they are indoors and don't get to roam and just have a good gosh darn time.

    Like I said letting it out is a risk, but if the cat has any real sense (and as I said earlier in the thread it's easy to see if they do) letting them roam around is a very low risk.

    Blake T on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Blaket wrote: »
    Snip.

    Defensive, aren't we? I wasn't insulting you, just disagreeing with your argument rather strenuously.

    No, cats are not naturally afraid of cars; it's not hardwired into their behavior, as they (obviously) didn't evolve around cars. Some cats are afraid of cars. Some cats are afraid of other things. I know a cat that's afraid of the air conditioner. Some cats do learn to stay out of the road most of the time, or to judge when a car is coming, but do you think a cat being chased by a dog is going to refrain from running out in front of a car? Again, it's very, very obvious that cats get run over regularly.

    No, cats are not humans. For one, you can usually tell a child to stay out of the road and it will understand you. Cats? Not so much.

    You still haven't addressed all the other issues that come up with outside cats. Feline leukemia? FIV? Wild animals (coyotes are prevalent in much of the U.S., and they eat cats regularly)? Not to mention that your neighbors have a perfect right to a cat-free yard, and many of them will take measures to achieve this. If a cat gets shot while trespassing on someone else's yard, it's the owner's fault. It's not a low-risk activity at all, but one dangerous to the cat and often a nuisance to those around you. Plus, if you really want to get into it, one extremely harmful to the wildlife around; cats are a large reason for the endangerment of many bird species.

    And as for attitude problems...yes, a cat's misbehavior will cause far fewer problems if it's outside. That's because...it's outside. If I want to not have to deal with my boyfriend's snoring, I can make him sleep on the couch, or we can work on strategies to keep him from snoring and deal with the root issues. Again, the vast, vast majority of cats can live happy, healthy, fulfilled, and TWO TIMES LONGER lives inside.

    Edit: On reflection, we're straying far away from Help and Advice and into Debate and Discourse, and I don't want a mod smackdown. If you want to continue the discussion in a different forum, I'd be glad to. Sorry for hijacking your thread, OP, and good luck with the kitties!

    Trowizilla on
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    Tw4winTw4win Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Rhino wrote: »
    I think I'm going to keep them in side for now. I live right on a busy street, my neighbor has a cat and my other neighbor has a big dog.

    When they get older I will put them in the street and see what happens. They are only kittens now and probably don't understand how cars work.

    Good choice. Letting them outside is always a bad decision unless you have a yard that is fenced in with a fence high enough so that they can't jump over it. My girlfriend and I have two cats. We've had them since they were kittens (one is now 6 and the other is older) and they have never, ever been outside. They live happy, productive lives. The key is that if you don't let them outside they will never miss it. It's really the safest thing to do.

    Regarding the litter box, put it in an area of low humidity and scoop it at least once a day. I also suggest putting it on carpet because it's a lot easier to vacuum up litter than it is to sweep it up. If you live someplace that only has hardwood floors go buy a cheap rug...

    Having a microchip installed is cheap and well worth it should your cat ever become "lost." However, if you're a good owner you won't be letting it outside so this shouldn't be a problem.

    Tw4win on
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    RNEMESiS42RNEMESiS42 Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I'd keep them inside until they mature a bit. We recently got a 10-week-old kitten, and I take him outside and let him romp around, but I supervise him. I don't let him run off out of my sight. Our apartment complex surrounds a courtyard, so it's pretty isolated from the street, anyway. Our other cats roam around fine, and keep away from the street. Although, recently the collar kept coming off of one of our cats, Todd. We were going to get him a new one, but a neighbor across the street (not part of our courtyard, all of your neighbors know our cats) thought Todd was a stray, and took him to the humane society. By the time we put up missing cat posters, Todd had already been euthanized by the wonderful humane society. They have a five day limit on cats, after which they put them up for adoption, or kill them. Apparently our young cat wasn't adoptable...Everyone in our courtyard was bummed because Todd was a favorite cat of the court.

    I don't really dig the RFID chips, but really make sure your cats are identified, and always will be!

    RNEMESiS42 on
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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    My wife and I have an Abyssinian kitten, we just got his papers back from the CFA on Friday so he's even got a number now. Here's some tips and tricks we've learned from a vast amount of research as well as talking with professional breeders:

    Buy high quality cat food. The main ingredients (first listed) should be meat, not corn, not meat byproduct. It costs more, but even expensive cat food is cheap. Good cat food with lots of proteins and a balanced diet will lead to a shiny, soft coat, good muscle mass, and high energy. They'll also naturally stay skinny, as they won't be loading up on carbs at every meal and will stay active. Many cat owners with fat cats discover that switching to a better food allows them to "free feed" (leave the food out) and the cat will simply eat enough to be comfortable, and will actually lose weight on its own. We feed our guy a mix of Iams Kitten, Innova EVO, and a little Orijen.

    Don't shop at just the pet stores. Placemats and doormats (at, say, Target) are super-cheap AND work fantastically for a food mat and a rug in front of the litter box. Target also stocks most common litters and is cheaper than Petco/Petsmart.

    Cats like a variety of toys, not because they get bored but because they get distracted. If you have a single toy mouse, if it gets under the couch they'll paw at it for a few minutes and then wander off, and then wonder where all their toys went. If you give them a variety, and collect them from "stuck" spots every few days, your kittens will have plenty of things to play with. Some toys they can play with independently (mice) and with you (fluffy or feathery things on a wand) is a good variety and lets them do their thing when they want to, and associate you with fun.

    Keep your kittens inside, and spend some time training them that outside=bad. If they're used to being outside, they'll know how to defend themselves, but it is true that an outdoor cat is a cat that lives a shorter life. Cats like to explore, but they're also very territorial. A cat left inside, and taught that the inside is its space, will happily roam around without ever bolting for the door -- they'll learn that the door is where "other things" are that aren't its space. Letting cats outside for a part of the day is big in Europe, but since everyone is doing it, more people keep an eye out for it. In the US, an outside cat usually means a stray, meaning that while your kittens may be fine for, say, 2-3 years, who's to say that one day a driver won't aim for your cat? Or a neighbor won't simply steal your cat if it's acting sweet? There's lethal things outside, but there's also other people. And inside your house, you can control the environment. Outside, they'll eat whatever they can find, run around, and unless you can give them a controlled space, you're leaving their wellbeing up to chance. Some are fine -- others get FeLV and are put down. The problem is you don't know until it happens. Cats can't get FeLV if they aren't exposed to other cats, though. Other outside cats may not have their claws trimmed either, meaning that if your cat gets in a fight, it may lose an eye.

    Cats like climbing on things, and they like having a "space." They're not people, so they don't need the ultra-padded super-swanky leopard-print egg-chair. They could be just as happy laying in a box you brought home, chewing on the edges. Both mean that you should have some things around for the cat that is just "the cats." A cat bed is nice, a scratching post is good, something for them to climb on that's made for cats is often both of those things as well as some exercise. And since it won't have people on it, they'll know it's for them and will play on that rather than your bookcases. (they'll still play on your bookcases but less frequently)

    Other than that, cats are very low maintenance. Feed them good food and clean their litter every day and they'll be happy. A treat can be a cat treat from the petfood store, or a bit of raw chicken. They love people meat (and it's typically high quality, naturally), but don't cook it for them -- raw is MUCH better. Hamburger is typically fatty, so I was giving our guy a little bit of chicken (about the same size as a piece of cat food kibble). He loves it, but it turned him into a beggar so I stopped.

    EggyToast on
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    starmanbrandstarmanbrand Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    If I may add an idea into the outside line of thought-
    If you get a catcarrier(those plasic carrier things with the cage on it), and you should because it makes taking the cat anywhere much easier, you can put the cat inside one of those and take it to the park or somewhere nice and green.

    Take it somewhere aware from all the playing kids and dogs getting walked, and let it out on a leash.

    It was weird the first time I started taking kittens out on a leash, but yo get used to it and if you have a long enough leash, the cats really dont mind. They get their out door time and they get used to wanting to get into carriers.

    starmanbrand on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    RNEMESiS42 wrote: »
    I'd keep them inside until they mature a bit. We recently got a 10-week-old kitten, and I take him outside and let him romp around, but I supervise him. I don't let him run off out of my sight. Our apartment complex surrounds a courtyard, so it's pretty isolated from the street, anyway. Our other cats roam around fine, and keep away from the street. Although, recently the collar kept coming off of one of our cats, Todd. We were going to get him a new one, but a neighbor across the street (not part of our courtyard, all of your neighbors know our cats) thought Todd was a stray, and took him to the humane society. By the time we put up missing cat posters, Todd had already been euthanized by the wonderful humane society. They have a five day limit on cats, after which they put them up for adoption, or kill them. Apparently our young cat wasn't adoptable...Everyone in our courtyard was bummed because Todd was a favorite cat of the court.

    I don't really dig the RFID chips, but really make sure your cats are identified, and always will be!

    dude. That story just bummed me out :( Poor todd.

    Rhino on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    EggyToast wrote: »
    My wife and I have an Abyssinian kitten, we just got his papers back from the CFA on Friday so he's even got a number now. Here's some tips and tricks we've learned from a vast amount of research as well as talking with professional breeders:

    Buy high quality cat food. The main ingredients (first listed) should be meat, not corn, not meat byproduct. It costs more, but even expensive cat food is cheap. Good cat food with lots of proteins and a balanced diet will lead to a shiny, soft coat, good muscle mass, and high energy. They'll also naturally stay skinny, as they won't be loading up on carbs at every meal and will stay active. Many cat owners with fat cats discover that switching to a better food allows them to "free feed" (leave the food out) and the cat will simply eat enough to be comfortable, and will actually lose weight on its own. We feed our guy a mix of Iams Kitten, Innova EVO, and a little Orijen.

    Don't shop at just the pet stores. Placemats and doormats (at, say, Target) are super-cheap AND work fantastically for a food mat and a rug in front of the litter box. Target also stocks most common litters and is cheaper than Petco/Petsmart.

    Cats like a variety of toys, not because they get bored but because they get distracted. If you have a single toy mouse, if it gets under the couch they'll paw at it for a few minutes and then wander off, and then wonder where all their toys went. If you give them a variety, and collect them from "stuck" spots every few days, your kittens will have plenty of things to play with. Some toys they can play with independently (mice) and with you (fluffy or feathery things on a wand) is a good variety and lets them do their thing when they want to, and associate you with fun.

    Keep your kittens inside, and spend some time training them that outside=bad. If they're used to being outside, they'll know how to defend themselves, but it is true that an outdoor cat is a cat that lives a shorter life. Cats like to explore, but they're also very territorial. A cat left inside, and taught that the inside is its space, will happily roam around without ever bolting for the door -- they'll learn that the door is where "other things" are that aren't its space. Letting cats outside for a part of the day is big in Europe, but since everyone is doing it, more people keep an eye out for it. In the US, an outside cat usually means a stray, meaning that while your kittens may be fine for, say, 2-3 years, who's to say that one day a driver won't aim for your cat? Or a neighbor won't simply steal your cat if it's acting sweet? There's lethal things outside, but there's also other people. And inside your house, you can control the environment. Outside, they'll eat whatever they can find, run around, and unless you can give them a controlled space, you're leaving their wellbeing up to chance. Some are fine -- others get FeLV and are put down. The problem is you don't know until it happens. Cats can't get FeLV if they aren't exposed to other cats, though. Other outside cats may not have their claws trimmed either, meaning that if your cat gets in a fight, it may lose an eye.

    Cats like climbing on things, and they like having a "space." They're not people, so they don't need the ultra-padded super-swanky leopard-print egg-chair. They could be just as happy laying in a box you brought home, chewing on the edges. Both mean that you should have some things around for the cat that is just "the cats." A cat bed is nice, a scratching post is good, something for them to climb on that's made for cats is often both of those things as well as some exercise. And since it won't have people on it, they'll know it's for them and will play on that rather than your bookcases. (they'll still play on your bookcases but less frequently)

    Other than that, cats are very low maintenance. Feed them good food and clean their litter every day and they'll be happy. A treat can be a cat treat from the petfood store, or a bit of raw chicken. They love people meat (and it's typically high quality, naturally), but don't cook it for them -- raw is MUCH better. Hamburger is typically fatty, so I was giving our guy a little bit of chicken (about the same size as a piece of cat food kibble). He loves it, but it turned him into a beggar so I stopped.


    Thanks. I'll keep all those points in mind. Good stuff.


    How much do cats 'cost'? I'm getting two... so figure in cat food and litter per month is 20-30 bucks?

    Rhino on
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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Around there. An estimate that some cat forums I check out sometime figured out is that, all things included, most cats average out to around $40 a month, which includes vet things, toys, and so on.

    EggyToast on
    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    How often do I have to take them to the vet? I'm going to take them when I first get them and then when they are old enough to get spaded; but besides that they should be alright, yea?

    Rhino on
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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Good food and exercise will mean you probably only have to take them every year or every other year, depending on what shots you get them. If they're kittens you'll probably be told when to take them (and if you aren't, just take them as soon as you have a chance), and then just ask the vet when they're due back for whatever else they need. They typically get a bunch of vaccines when they're young, but if they're indoor-only cats you can decide whether you want to inoculate them each year, or every 3 years.

    Generally, cats (and most pets) signal that something is wrong by doing a regular behavior wrong, such as not eating, missing the litter box, etc. Kittens can get upper respiratory infections pretty easily, but otherwise they're not exposed to much as cats as long as they stay inside so you don't have to worry about them getting sick. Which is pretty convenient.

    EggyToast on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Rhino wrote: »
    How often do I have to take them to the vet? I'm going to take them when I first get them and then when they are old enough to get spaded; but besides that they should be alright, yea?

    They're old enough to get spayed now, and the sooner you do it, the lower their risk of many cancers. Plus, a cat in heat is miserable and will try to escape, and a lot of cats go into heat much sooner than people expect. Besides, kittens heal up faster, so the whole experience will be less painful for them.

    After the round of kitten stuff, they just need a checkup every year. Something to remember, though, is that cats don't act like they're sick until they're really, really sick, so it's a good idea to have the phone number and address of a 24-hour emergency vet on hand. A couple hours can make a huge difference in whether your cat survives.

    Trowizilla on
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    phoxphyrephoxphyre Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Trowizilla wrote: »
    Rhino wrote: »
    How often do I have to take them to the vet? I'm going to take them when I first get them and then when they are old enough to get spaded; but besides that they should be alright, yea?

    They're old enough to get spayed now, and the sooner you do it, the lower their risk of many cancers. Plus, a cat in heat is miserable and will try to escape, and a lot of cats go into heat much sooner than people expect. Besides, kittens heal up faster, so the whole experience will be less painful for them.

    After the round of kitten stuff, they just need a checkup every year. Something to remember, though, is that cats don't act like they're sick until they're really, really sick, so it's a good idea to have the phone number and address of a 24-hour emergency vet on hand. A couple hours can make a huge difference in whether your cat survives.

    Quoted for truth. Always keep an eye on your cats, if they are acting unnatural, take 'em to the vet. Doesn't matter whether they are slightly limping, have a swelling, or what appears to be a small wound. $40 spent now may mean a couple of injections vs debriding (sp?) a wound / sepsis...

    Regarding spaying age: 5 1/2 months is when I have been told to get my little girl (and boy) done. By 3 different vets/breeders. Apparently, this will allow them to do the majority of their growing with the hormones they need. And yes, I did have to put up with some 'Heats', and no they are not pleasant (note: one on heat, gets the other one going ><) But in the end, I'd much rather have some inconvenience now than nastiness later in life.

    Enjoy your kitties! Scratching posts and cat tunnels (AWESOME btw) lead to much madness and laughter.

    phoxphyre on
    Remember the Slug; They have all the disadvantages of Snails, but without the benefit of home-ownership...
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    If I get them spaded early does that make them stop growing and stunt their growth?

    How do I know if they are in the heats?

    Rhino on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Rhino wrote: »
    If I get them spaded early does that make them stop growing and stunt their growth?

    How do I know if they are in the heats?

    Spayed. Spayed. Spayed. Spaded sounds like it has something to do with gardening implements. And no, it doesn't stunt their growth. Some vets believe that spaying them later is better, but not the ones I've ever dealt with. Plus, the fewer heats they go through, the lower the chance of reproductive cancers, with no heats being the ideal.

    You know they're in heat because they'll be pains in the ass, yowling, trying to escape, spraying nasty liquid on things, and basically trying to get you (and guests, and the furniture) to have sex with them. They can go into heat as early as four months.

    Trowizilla on
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    GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Trowizilla wrote: »
    Rhino wrote: »
    If I get them spaded early does that make them stop growing and stunt their growth?

    How do I know if they are in the heats?

    Spayed. Spayed. Spayed. Spaded sounds like it has something to do with gardening implements. And no, it doesn't stunt their growth. Some vets believe that spaying them later is better, but not the ones I've ever dealt with. Plus, the fewer heats they go through, the lower the chance of reproductive cancers, with no heats being the ideal.

    You know they're in heat because they'll be pains in the ass, yowling, trying to escape, spraying nasty liquid on things, and basically trying to get you (and guests, and the furniture) to have sex with them. They can go into heat as early as four months.

    A cat in heat is probably one of the most annoying things in the world. So get them spayed.


    ss29020.jpg I imagine if you spaded them with one of these it would most certainly stunt their growth. It would also make you a bad person.

    Gihgehls on
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    ScumdoggScumdogg Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Trowizilla wrote: »
    Don't let them out.

    FIV (cat AIDS),

    feline leukemia,

    fights with other cats and feral dogs,

    people who shoot cats for digging up their gardens,

    crazy kids,

    etc.



    For the love of god, if you care about your new kittens AT ALL, listen to this guy. Cats do not "need" to be let out. Absolutely do not listen to any of this "calculated risk" bullshit. My wife manages a large veterinary clinic, and the stories of unattended domestic cats left to "play" outdoors are absolutely horrifying. There is no limit at all to the terrible things that can go wrong. And believe me, if you're going for the "quality of life" scenario, being locked indoors beats out FIV every freaking time. I have seen cats die of this, and it is most unpleasant. I've seen domestic cats hit by a car in front of us, but not enough to kill them, so we stop, spend time hunting them down, and take them to the clinic. Often they are microchipped, declawed, and obviously domestic. Too bad they had an owner that thought they needed to be outside to be happy, because their skull just got blasted open by some dude's license plate. Sure, they might have caught a mouse this morning and had a grand time, but now one eyeball is knocked out of its socket and their jaw is broken in three places. I've seen domestic cats that were cornered by douchebag redneck apartment maintenance crews and covered in some nasty caustic shit that they use for cleaning freon buildup out of refrigerators, leaving their skin a slushy liquid mess. Hooray for outside time!

    If you can read this and still be convinced by "Cats are natural predators etc etc", you should not under any circumstances own pets.

    Scumdogg on
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    TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Scumdogg wrote: »
    Trowizilla wrote: »
    Don't let them out.

    FIV (cat AIDS),

    feline leukemia,

    fights with other cats and feral dogs,

    people who shoot cats for digging up their gardens,

    crazy kids,

    etc.



    For the love of god, if you care about your new kittens AT ALL, listen to this guy. Cats do not "need" to be let out. Absolutely do not listen to any of this "calculated risk" bullshit. My wife manages a large veterinary clinic, and the stories of unattended domestic cats left to "play" outdoors are absolutely horrifying. There is no limit at all to the terrible things that can go wrong. And believe me, if you're going for the "quality of life" scenario, being locked indoors beats out FIV every freaking time. I have seen cats die of this, and it is most unpleasant. I've seen domestic cats hit by a car in front of us, but not enough to kill them, so we stop, spend time hunting them down, and take them to the clinic. Often they are microchipped, declawed, and obviously domestic. Too bad they had an owner that thought they needed to be outside to be happy, because their skull just got blasted open by some dude's license plate. Sure, they might have caught a mouse this morning and had a grand time, but now one eyeball is knocked out of its socket and their jaw is broken in three places. I've seen domestic cats that were cornered by douchebag redneck apartment maintenance crews and covered in some nasty caustic shit that they use for cleaning freon buildup out of refrigerators, leaving their skin a slushy liquid mess. Hooray for outside time!

    If you can read this and still be convinced by "Cats are natural predators etc etc", you should not under any circumstances own pets.

    I'm not a guy, but otherwise, I'm with you 100%. I've seen too many roadkill cats that obviously weren't killed right away, that dragged themselves a little way off the road to go die painfully and miserably.

    Also, I second the person saying to teach your cats to walk on a leash if you really want them to go outside. I did this with the last cat I lived with and it worked beautifully. Plus, it's a chick magnet. :wink:

    Trowizilla on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Thanks for all the info guys. Here is some kitten pictures for your troubles.



    Pictures!

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    YOU'RE DOING IT WRONG:
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    Rhino on
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    Uncle LongUncle Long Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    d'awwwww.

    Congrats, those look like a fine set of kittens.

    Uncle Long on
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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Our cat loves cardboard boxes.

    VisionOfClarity on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Our cat loves cardboard boxes.

    mine too!


    I built them a box fort! It's so awesome.

    I wish I had a box fort.

    One thing I realized is that cats like to chew on boxes (cardboard to be exact).

    Nom Nom Nom. I haz a cardboard steak

    Rhino on
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    DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited November 2007
    My cat is so pissed that I took his cardboard fort away (I'm moving, he's still at the old house and the fort is at the new house)

    Unknown User on
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    GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Those kittens look delicious! I want to gobble them up! Very cute. :)

    Gihgehls on
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    RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Gihgehls wrote: »
    Those kittens look delicious! I want to gobble them up! Very cute. :)

    They aren't for eating!

    Rhino on
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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Rhino wrote: »
    Gihgehls wrote: »
    Those kittens look delicious! I want to gobble them up! Very cute. :)

    They aren't for eating!

    Just a litte taste maybe, hmmm?
    [/Dr. Zoidberg]

    MichaelLC on
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    ben0207ben0207 Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    All these people saying tha she should lock your cat indoors are plain wrong.

    Yeah, there's a risk it might get it's face smeared 3 blocks by a passing Volvo, but I'd rather cat with personality allowed to live how it should for 7 years than a cat locked indoors acting as little more than hungry furniture for 15.

    Of course, I live somewhere where animal cruelty is properly illegal, so the biggest risk when we let ours out is that somebody might feed them as well as us and they'll get fat. They're intelligent creatures, perhaps far more so than most people give them credit for, and they know to avoid / cross roads well enough.

    If I wnated to get a pet that woud live indoors it's whole life? I wouldn't get something that is born with claws and teeth and that can jump and climb. I'd get a fish.

    And please don't even get me started on declawing.

    ben0207 on
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    GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    My kitty gets to go outside, but only when I am outside too. I think if you have a large property or backyard, letting your cat out is one thing, but in an urban setting? No way. Animal cruelty or not, there are still cat diseases out there that aren't present in my apartment. And as smart as cats are, mine isn't smart enough to know that what lies outside is more interesting than what she has inside. Probably.

    Gihgehls on
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    Not SarastroNot Sarastro __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2007
    Scumdogg wrote: »
    Trowizilla wrote: »
    Don't let them out.

    FIV (cat AIDS),

    feline leukemia,

    fights with other cats and feral dogs,

    people who shoot cats for digging up their gardens,

    crazy kids,

    etc.



    For the love of god, if you care about your new kittens AT ALL, listen to this guy. Cats do not "need" to be let out. Absolutely do not listen to any of this "calculated risk" bullshit. My wife manages a large veterinary clinic, and the stories of unattended domestic cats left to "play" outdoors are absolutely horrifying. There is no limit at all to the terrible things that can go wrong. And believe me, if you're going for the "quality of life" scenario, being locked indoors beats out FIV every freaking time. I have seen cats die of this, and it is most unpleasant. I've seen domestic cats hit by a car in front of us, but not enough to kill them, so we stop, spend time hunting them down, and take them to the clinic. Often they are microchipped, declawed, and obviously domestic. Too bad they had an owner that thought they needed to be outside to be happy, because their skull just got blasted open by some dude's license plate. Sure, they might have caught a mouse this morning and had a grand time, but now one eyeball is knocked out of its socket and their jaw is broken in three places. I've seen domestic cats that were cornered by douchebag redneck apartment maintenance crews and covered in some nasty caustic shit that they use for cleaning freon buildup out of refrigerators, leaving their skin a slushy liquid mess. Hooray for outside time!

    If you can read this and still be convinced by "Cats are natural predators etc etc", you should not under any circumstances own pets.

    This is an American thing, isn't it.

    Ownership of lethal weapons is a human right; You're all going to burn in The Fire except me and my mates who will be whisked up on the wings of angels, and it's happening tomorrow (copyright circa. 1970); Horiffic deplorable violence is okay so long as you don't say any naughty words; Cats must not under any circumstances be allowed outside.

    That's about the level of crazy on which the rest of the world sees this particular idea, just FYI. I live in one of the biggest metropolitan areas in the world, where there is no such idiocy about locking cats indoors. I see cats around the neighbourhood, but we are not swamped with strays, nor are there piles of roadkill corpses littering the side of the road after being hit by cars. I also lived in suburban DC some time ago, and have family in California, both places where people also let cats outside, and there is no feline holocaust of the kind you describe; so please don't suggest it's a uniquely American problem.

    Also, you do realise that all your arguments re: FIV and people killing cats are just as sensationalist and idiotically risk-averse as saying one should never have sex or go outside incase of catching disease or being mugged. So please don't dictate to people about what they can and cannot do based on your view of the world. If someone reads that, and is still convinced by "Cats are natural predators etc", they might just be placing a little common sense & proportion above your rabid insistence on an extreme course of action based on wildly anecdotal evidence.

    Don't even get me started on declawing.

    Not Sarastro on
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    GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    So please don't dictate to people about what they can and cannot do based on your view of the world.

    Gihgehls on
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    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Rhino wrote: »
    Gihgehls wrote: »
    Orc.8.1.06.jpg
    Those kittens look delicious! I want to gobble them up! Very cute. :)
    lotr2_2-80496.jpg
    They are not for eating!

    KalTorak on
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