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Where did you think we'd be?

RainZRainZ Registered User regular
edited November 2007 in Games and Technology
So I grew up like most of you, playing games. C64 era Bards Tale, then NES and so on...
I remember thinking back then when a new game would come out how amazing it was, and how much i couldn't wait for the future of games.

I was so ready for the future i had a freakin Powerglove. I always envisioned games becoming something so all encompassing that they were a big part of most peoples lives, and that people would perhaps spend their normal days suspended within some sort of game. I guess this is kind of true of MMO's but its not what my sci fi dreams were imagining. It seems to me that sometimes with all the Normal Mapping, Pixel Shaders, Parallax Mapping etc, that im still 20 years or so later, playing that C64 Bards Tale in a way.

I realize i had very unrealistic expectations now, and im in no way dissapointed as gems like Bioshock prove to me how far we have come. Still though its fun to look back and realise how stupid those thoughts were..

Anyone else ever think we would be somewhere that we just aren't yet?

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RainZ on
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Posts

  • INeedNoSaltINeedNoSalt with blood on my teeth Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I was absolutely certain (back when I understood what 'genetic engineering' could mean but not what it actually did mean) that by now, we would have real-live pokemon.

    INeedNoSalt on
  • ThandorThandor __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2007
    Bioshock, while fun, has showed me know innovation. The things like the DS give me hope that things will get innovative slowly but surely.

    Thandor on
  • The_ScarabThe_Scarab Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I remember the days when movie tie in games werent shovelware crap and were some of the best games released ever. Lion King. alladdin et al.

    i guess i assumed that trend would continue. it did not.

    The_Scarab on
  • KrunkMcGrunkKrunkMcGrunk Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The_Scarab wrote: »
    I remember the days when movie tie in games werent shovelware crap and were some of the best games released ever. Lion King. alladdin et al.

    i guess i assumed that trend would continue. it did not.

    What? Are you serious?

    KrunkMcGrunk on
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  • DangerousDangerous Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Back to the future and ET would like a word with you.

    Dangerous on
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  • TeevirusTeevirus Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Aladdin was probably the hardest game ever.

    Teevirus on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The_Scarab wrote: »
    I remember the days when movie tie in games werent shovelware crap and were some of the best games released ever. Lion King. alladdin et al.

    i guess i assumed that trend would continue. it did not.

    istockphoto_2693530_rose_coloured_glasses.jpg

    Food on
  • KelorKelor Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I for one have noticed a distinct lack of flying cars.

    Kelor on
  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Regent Bears The Name FreedomRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    So much for virtual reality.

    cj iwakura on
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  • DangerousDangerous Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I want my damn holodeck already.

    Dangerous on
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  • ArcticMonkeyArcticMonkey Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Teevirus wrote: »
    Aladdin was probably the hardest game ever.

    Not the SNES version I hope. I remember getting pretty far in that one and I just borrowed it for a week or so.

    Not sure how many versions there was made of Aladdin. GB and Genesis versions where different then the SNES one I think.

    ArcticMonkey on
    "You read it! You can't unread it!"
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  • slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    edit: n/m.

    slash000 on
  • Fatty McBeardoFatty McBeardo Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I think Bioshock was a shining example of nearly perfecting existing ideas. I've never given much thought as to where we'd be. I just want virtual reality lightsaber duels.

    Fatty McBeardo on
  • lsukalellsukalel Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    We are about where I thought we would be because of the Wii and the possibilites with Wii Fit's Board.

    lsukalel on
  • BakerIsBoredBakerIsBored Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Dangerous wrote: »
    Back to the future and ET would like a word with you.

    I'm not sure if you’re referring to the old ET game... but the old ET game sucked... big time. :P

    I thought Virtural Boy was going to be the future of gaming. (kidding)

    BakerIsBored on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    If you'd asked me fifteen or sixteen years ago, I'd probably have told you we'd be playing virtual reality machines of some sort. (this was before the VB of course)

    slash000 on
  • RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The_Scarab wrote: »
    I remember the days when movie tie in games werent shovelware crap and were some of the best games released ever. Lion King. alladdin et al.

    i guess i assumed that trend would continue. it did not.

    What? Are you serious?

    Aladdin, though bloody difficult, was a great game. The Lion King was alright, not a bad game really. but movie tie-ins were always terrible.
    I think Bioshock was a shining example of nearly perfecting existing ideas. I've never given much thought as to where we'd be. I just want virtual reality lightsaber duels.

    And I just want a holodeck! If I have one of those, I'll never want again. The simpler one's desire, the harder it is to attain!

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • KrunkMcGrunkKrunkMcGrunk Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    ^I didn't really mean those two game specifically, both were OK. But yeah, movie tie-ins, as a rule of thumb, were terrible. Honestly, the first really good one was Golden Eye 64, in my opinion.


    Yeah, I figured we'd have like completely encompassing virtual reality chambers.

    KrunkMcGrunk on
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  • GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I was absolutely certain (back when I understood what 'genetic engineering' could mean but not what it actually did mean) that by now, we would have real-live pokemon.

    While this isn't really what you're talking about, I'd be shocked if moderate forms of genetic engineering in pets isn't possible within 10 years (with fur color being the obvious easiest first target)... hell, the initial concept works in humans now, it's just finding a good vector to get it into the cells that doesn't also give you cancer that's the problem


    Back to gaming - I think I am a little surprised how slow some things have gone, though I will say that I was absolutely floored the first time I played Oblivion, and Crysis looks amazing on a good PC (not on mine.. :P)... I think we're not all that far off from really amazing MMO games, though it seems pretty clear that the limiting factor at this point is the crappy bandwidth most of the US has available to them. And while the idea of plugging something into your brain is obviously not going to happen anytime soon, the way LCD sizes have been scaling upwards it will be pretty amazing what could happen in the next 20 years

    Gdiguy on
  • TelMarineTelMarine Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The_Scarab wrote: »
    I remember the days when movie tie in games werent shovelware crap and were some of the best games released ever. Lion King. alladdin et al.

    i guess i assumed that trend would continue. it did not.

    What? Are you serious?

    actually a lot of them were bad. Aladdin, Lion King, and the NES Disney games were good because they were made by respected dev. houses, namely Westwood Studios and Capcom.

    TelMarine on
    3ds: 4983-4935-4575
  • GertBeefGertBeef Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Hover cars with consoles in them!

    GertBeef on
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  • BakerIsBoredBakerIsBored Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    TelMarine wrote: »
    The_Scarab wrote: »
    I remember the days when movie tie in games werent shovelware crap and were some of the best games released ever. Lion King. alladdin et al.

    i guess i assumed that trend would continue. it did not.

    What? Are you serious?

    actually a lot of them were bad. Aladdin, Lion King, and the NES Disney games were good because they were made by respected dev. houses, namely Westwood Studios and Capcom.

    I thought Lion King on the Genesis was a good game, I liked going from cub to full grown Lion pwnage. :)

    BakerIsBored on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • VicissitudeVicissitude Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    GertBeef wrote: »
    Consoles with hover cars in them!

    Vicissitude on
  • RoshinRoshin My backlog can be seen from space SwedenRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    slash000 wrote: »
    If you'd asked me fifteen or sixteen years ago, I'd probably have told you we'd be playing virtual reality machines of some sort. (this was before the VB of course)

    Yes, some sort of William Gibson style 3D projection games or pr0n. Yeah, I said it. You were all thinking it, anyway.
    ^I didn't really mean those two game specifically, both were OK. But yeah, movie tie-ins, as a rule of thumb, were terrible. Honestly, the first really good one was Golden Eye 64, in my opinion.

    Anyone else remember Ocean's movie tie-ins on the C64? They would pick up every movie license they could get their hands on and mercilessly turned every one into a generic platformer.

    Roshin on
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  • slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Ocean.. that practice did not cease with the C64, and continued well into the 16-bit era.

    slash000 on
  • TeevirusTeevirus Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Teevirus wrote: »
    Aladdin was probably the hardest game ever.

    Not the SNES version I hope. I remember getting pretty far in that one and I just borrowed it for a week or so.

    Not sure how many versions there was made of Aladdin. GB and Genesis versions where different then the SNES one I think.

    Genesis. I was fucking little, though. Lay off. Haha.

    Teevirus on
  • bashbash Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Fortunately I never got sucked into the virtual reality hype, I didn't want to play a game wearing a huge headset. To me it was either a Holodeck or bust. I did get bitten by the CD/multimedia bug in the early 90s however. I figured all games would eventually be mostly FMV with some sprite action for interactivity. Seeing games like 7th Guest and Myst reinforced that idea. I think I was partially right about that, while consoles like Saturn and PlayStation did use CDs for storing lots of multimedia content, the first person FMV adventure games didn't take off as well as I thought they would. I'm not disappointed by this because both consoles used the relatively massive storage capacity of CDs to put a lot of content in games. Though I never thought it would hit the levels it is today I thought true 3D games would be really important down the road. The first really real 3D game I spent much time with was Star Fox on the SNES. While it wasn't a sandbox shooter the 3D aspect floored me when I first saw it.

    There's two things I really didn't expect to happen which I suppose are germane to this thread. The first is the fall of the arcade. Though some people here might not remember, way back when home consoles were a far cry from what was available in the arcade. Some of the biggest Genesis and SNES games were arcade ports. The Saturn and PlayStation competed early on to have the most and most accurate arcade ports. The Saturn was defined by its near-perfect ports of 2D arcade fighters like Street Fighter Alpha. I suppose for a number of reasons arcades started to die out. I think it had a lot to do with the PlayStation getting popular and having a lot of decent (not great but decent) arcade ports. No one was going to go to the arcade and dump quarters into a cabinet if they could invite their friends over and play for free in their living room. I'd be interested in reading a good history of arcades if anyone knows of one.

    The second gaming milestone I missed out on was the popularity of the internet. I don't mean popularity of the internet in general but specifically for gaming. I was using BBSes and dial-up online services before the general public really had access to the internet. While there were some rudimentary game services then I didn't think things were going to progress much further than modem-modem games on PCs. In the mid-90s only a handful of games supported TCP/IP play. Of those that did most didn't take into account the high packet loss and latency of dial-up connections and TCP/IP play was only really viable over a LAN (or from college ResNets).

    I think three games had a huge effect on TCP/IP games, all around thesame time: SubSpace, QuakeWorld, and Diablo. SubSpace was the first network game you could really play over a dial-up TCP/IP connection. The game it was based off of (Sniper) was designed to experiement with the effects of lag with dial-up connections in large games. Not only was SubSpace playable but ridiculously addicting. QuakeWorld was another big game when it comes to network play. Like SubSpace it was designed to handle the prevalent and shitty dial-up connections of the time. Unlike the original Quake you could actually play QW on a dial-up connection. Finally Diablo, which not only did a good job of playing well over dial-up connections but also had a highly effective connection service in Battle.net. SubSpace and QuakeWorld (QuakeSpy) had similar hosting/matching services but Battle.net made it a lot easier to host your own game even if you were on a 56k connection.

    bash on
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  • Edgler VessEdgler Vess Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I Thought for sure graphics would have been "Pixar Level" by now, a friend and I talked about it for weeks comparing Quake II to "Toy Story"..I think....Seems we arent quite there yet.

    Edgler Vess on
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  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I can't say I ever thought about what the future of gaming would be like as a child, but I can tell you what I think about the future of gaming now (hopefully next generation, or even this generation): good AI. Something worthy of actually being called 'Artificially Intelligent,' rather than 'Using a very large and complex script to make it seem like it's artificially intelligent.'

    Zombiemambo on
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  • BakerIsBoredBakerIsBored Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I Thought for sure graphics would have been "Pixar Level" by now, a friend and I talked about it for weeks comparing Quake II to "Toy Story"..I think....Seems we arent quite there yet.

    Have you not played Ratchet and Clank? We getting pretty damn close I think.

    BakerIsBored on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • WybornWyborn GET EQUIPPED Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    When I was young I envisioned something like Steel Battalion set within this pod contraption that you could buy.

    Man. I'd play the hell out of Steel Battalion all over again.

    Wyborn on
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  • DekuStickDekuStick Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I remember after a long session of Super Mario World and switching to the tv that I could not wait until video games became just like "I was playing tv". I didn't think too much about it and I didn't think too much about virtual reality or any of that. I just wanted to control the people on my tv. I can't wait for graphics to get real life good.

    In better terms I'm waiting for someone to write the matrix program.

    DekuStick on
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I started programming when I was 8 years old. Needless to say, that killed my wild expectations pretty quickly.

    Frankly, I thought where we are today was pretty much impossible back when the saturn was released. There was a pretty big point where I thought 3D games couldn't progress quickly because of man hours. I.E. super detailed worlds where we see every blade of grass would take too long to make.

    But, I can still remember a time, long long long OH SO LONG ago when games seemed magical and wide open. I can remember spending hours in wonderboy in monsterland trying to do stuff you couldn't do because, to me at the time, anything was possible in a game.

    TheSonicRetard on
  • Mr_GrinchMr_Grinch Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I loved the feeling of anything being possible in a game, when you realise (as you get older/more experienced) how the game engine works, a lot of the magic is gone.

    When I was younger I imagined games to look like television too, Dragon's Quest reinforced this and when I first saw the pictures in magazines I was blown away. As I got a bit older, FMV was slowly coming in to use and I think the first game I played that was ALL FMV was nighttrap, and that was magical. At the time the crap acting didn't bother me, I was too young to notice, and for all intents and purposes, I WAS playing a TV Show. Marvellous. Night Trap and Ground Zero Texas kept me entertained for far too long.

    The next step was Virtual Reality (for me) because, at that time, it was being slowly introduced. Arcades over the country were being given these virtual reality machines to set up and, whilst they were expensive, they were pretty cool. I remember playing one where I sat in a cockpit of a plane, put the virtual reality helmet on and the game took me in to a dogfight, I could look over my shoulder and see a plane on my wing, bank left and start shooting at it. The graphics for the time were pretty impressive too.

    This is where I saw gaming going, more immersion.

    Sadly (and I am pretty serious there) the virtual reality machines became sparser and sparser and the ideas created from them largely forgotten. The last time I played on one was a 3D boxing game in Ibiza about seven or eight years ago. I'd gone on holiday to celebrate the end of my A-Levels and there was an arcade down the main street. I went in and there were two circles in the middle of the room. They had padded arm rests all the way round. You walked in to the circle and put on your headset and slipped on a pair of gloves. Another player did exactly the same in the other circle.

    And then you just slugged it out like you were beating the crap out of each other in real life. It wasn't completely 1:1 motion but for the time it was pretty impressive, and with the camera following the motion of your head it was very very immersive.

    Playing that game whilst completely pissed was certainly an experience.

    By now I expected games to immerse the player a little more, enhanced graphics and rumble in controllers isn't really where I saw things going (whilst I did expect graphics to get better and better until they hit photo-realistic quality). The Wii has gone somewhat to increasing immersion and it's a step in the right direction but it's not quite where i'd hoped we'd be back when I used to play on my little C64.

    Mr_Grinch on
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  • ben0207ben0207 Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I'd say we were at the level of early Pixar (the chess game thing, Toy Story 1) easily.

    ben0207 on
  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    When I was a kid playing my Amiga, and later on the DOS computer my dad harvested from work, I assumed that games like Simon the Sorcerer, Monkey Island and King's Quest would continue to be produced in years to come. I was wrong :( Broken Sword and Grim Fandango are notable exceptions, but the 3D Simon the Sorcerer was dire, and I only got as far as I did through sheer determination to get to the good game that must have been hiding in it somewhere.

    Back when I played The Feeble Files, I spend a pound for twenty minutes in an Internet café to get hints. I dreamed of the day when the Internet would be available cheaply and at home. When we eventually got it, I dreamed of the day when I could use it uninterrupted by phone calls, and play games that required an Internet connection without having to go through AOL's log in window.

    Also, Knightmare-style gaming. Link for Americans and other aliens.

    Rhesus Positive on
    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
  • NarketNarket __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2007
    Teevirus wrote: »
    Teevirus wrote: »
    Aladdin was probably the hardest game ever.

    Not the SNES version I hope. I remember getting pretty far in that one and I just borrowed it for a week or so.

    Not sure how many versions there was made of Aladdin. GB and Genesis versions where different then the SNES one I think.

    Genesis. I was fucking little, though. Lay off. Haha.

    YES!! The Genesis version was really fucking hard. Jafar has to be one of the hardest bosses I have ever faced. I ended up using codes to beat him just to see the ending. The carpet ride in the Cave of Wonders level was the shit!

    Narket on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • BakerIsBoredBakerIsBored Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Mr_Grinch wrote: »
    ...

    The next step was Virtual Reality (for me) because, at that time, it was being slowly introduced. Arcades over the country were being given these virtual reality machines to set up and, whilst they were expensive, they were pretty cool. I remember playing one where I sat in a cockpit of a plane, put the virtual reality helmet on and the game took me in to a dogfight, I could look over my shoulder and see a plane on my wing, bank left and start shooting at it. The graphics for the time were pretty impressive too.

    This is where I saw gaming going, more immersion.

    Sadly (and I am pretty serious there) the virtual reality machines became sparser and sparser and the ideas created from them largely forgotten. The last time I played on one was a 3D boxing game in Ibiza about seven or eight years ago. I'd gone on holiday to celebrate the end of my A-Levels and there was an arcade down the main street. I went in and there were two circles in the middle of the room. They had padded arm rests all the way round. You walked in to the circle and put on your headset and slipped on a pair of gloves. Another player did exactly the same in the other circle.

    And then you just slugged it out like you were beating the crap out of each other in real life. It wasn't completely 1:1 motion but for the time it was pretty impressive, and with the camera following the motion of your head it was very very immersive.

    ...

    I remember the time when almost every mall you walked into had some sort of Virtual Reality gaming thing set up. I'm not sure if you all have played it... Put on the visor, they hand you the gun, and you go 1on1 with someone else that also paid to play. Don't see those things to much anymore....

    BakerIsBored on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • TheSonicRetardTheSonicRetard Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Mr_Grinch wrote: »
    I loved the feeling of anything being possible in a game, when you realise (as you get older/more experienced) how the game engine works, a lot of the magic is gone.

    The magic is gone, yes, but it's replaced with curiosity. I literally get a sort of high from figuring out game logic - pouring through lines of ASM and code, reading, putting it all together in my head, until it finally clicks and I know exactly how it works. That process, and the end moment... jesus, that's an intense buzz for me. I really like the feeling.

    TheSonicRetard on
  • EddieDeanEddieDean Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Not so much gaming, but I remember one of the early days of the new milennium just being driven to town, and realising that we didn't have flying cars and shiny white and chrome and glass houses. I kinda expected it to happen right at the moment of 2000, because 2000 was the future.

    EddieDean on
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