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Birth Control Patch

CrayonCrayon Sleeps in the wrong bed.TejasRegistered User regular
edited November 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Ok, so my girlfriend is on the patch and I'm not entirely too sure about some information.

Ok, it makes the statement that during your first patch that you are not protected for 7 days, not until the second patch...but I'm not entirely too sure if this is referring to it being the actual first patch using ortho evra, or it being the first patch of each 4-week cycle.

So basically, you go three weeks while wearing it, you have an off week for the period-and then you restart. When she restarts is she automatically protected or does that "not protected for seven days" line start all over again each month? I'm kind of confused with the information on ortho evra. She's been using it for about 3-4 years.

She changes every sunday, but basically this is how it goes, lets go ahead and break it down.

1st week - Puts her patch on Sunday. 2nd week-puts it on sunday, 3rd week-puts it on sunday. When the first "patch free" she takes it off on sunday to have her period, she then restarts by putting another one on Sunday. So for one week she is without the patch and she puts it back on Sunday restarting the 1st week.

Crayon on

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    FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    As long as she uses it religiously when she's supposed to, takes it off when she's supposed to, and puts a new one on when she's supposed to, then it's effect is continuous. There's no seven day window of fertility after the initial month.

    It works by preventing ovulation. As long as it does the job in a given cycle, then there's no babies that cycle. But missing the patch, even by a few days, can cause ovulation to occur and then she's fertile that cycle.

    Make sense?

    Feral on
    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
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    CrayonCrayon Sleeps in the wrong bed. TejasRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Feral wrote: »
    As long as she uses it religiously when she's supposed to, takes it off when she's supposed to, and puts a new one on when she's supposed to, then it's effect is continuous. There's no seven day window of fertility after the initial month.

    It works by preventing ovulation. As long as it does the job in a given cycle, then there's no babies that cycle. But missing the patch, even by a few days, can cause ovulation to occur and then she's fertile that cycle.

    Make sense?

    Ok, so the "Use an alternate form of contraception for seven days" only applies to those users who are using Ortho Evra for the first time...ever? It seems the wording on the ortho evra site relates to the first cycle of every 4 week cycle as opposed to just a one time thing. And yes, she's insanely religious about making sure she puts it on Sunday at midnight or Monday morning at 6 in the morning. I believe that time frame is adequate. I just wasn't entirely sure if the 7 day window only applied to first-ever users or users every single month.

    Thanks for clearing it up.

    Crayon on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2007
    the first time ever, or if she's been on antibiotics. I'm not sure if vomiting or diarrhoea would affect the patch the way it does the pill (either event within a few hours of taking the pill mean it may not have been absorbed properly), probably not since its straight into the bloodstream.

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    browneyedsquirrelbrowneyedsquirrel Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Yes, you are safe. The wording relates to the first week you use the patch ever.

    Basically as long as you don't go more than 7 days without the patch on you are good to go.

    If you are late putting it on, you just need to use alternate protection for the next full week. If you are feeling paranoid and she forgets to put it on, use protection for the next full month until she restarts the next patch cycle.

    If ever she forgets to put it on for a day or two and you just aren't sure, just have her call her doc and lay out the time frames to them. They will tell you if you are safe or if you need to use backup.

    browneyedsquirrel on
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    Butterfly4uButterfly4u Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I was on the patch for a couple years. Sometimes I didn't get to the pharmacy on time due to my job so I'd just wear my patch an extra day. My doctor didn't recommend it, but she told me with my body size the patch had enough medicine in it to be worn for a week and a half. My point is the patch isn't like the pill. The patch has medicine that lasts in the bloodstream way past the time it needs to. The site says you are given up to 60% more hormones with the patch than you get with the pill. Also the patch is okay for women up to 200 LBS. That means there's enough hormone in the patch to cover a 198LB woman the same as a 100LB woman. Don't stess your woman is covered.

    Butterfly4u on
    Butterfly
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    IreneDAdlerIreneDAdler Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The site says you are given up to 60% more hormones with the patch than you get with the pill.

    Oh dang. I was thinking about trying out the patch, because I'm horrible with remembering to take pills regularly, and the hormone fluctuations really fuck up my body. But if it's that much more than the pill, then I don't think I can do the patch. I've been on Alesse for the past few years, and it's ok. Anyone else here have experience with Alesse and the patch?

    IreneDAdler on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    browneyedsquirrelbrowneyedsquirrel Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    My experience has been okay on the pill (lo ovral and ortho tricyclene) but I too forgot to take them all the time.

    I tried Depo Provera (the shot) and that was horrible. I got every side effect imaginable and was off it after the first three month cycle.

    The patch has been good to me. In fact, even on the pill I used to get really bad cramps the first two days of my period so much that I passed out from it once when I was younger. Now that I'm on the patch, I hardly get cramps at all.

    The only problem I've ever heard of any friends having with using the patch is that the adhesive on the patch itself can irritate sensitive skins. It did for mine a little bit when I first started wearing it, but I don't have any issues at all with it anymore.

    I used pill form for years, tried Depo, hated it and went back to the pill and then tried the patch when I started college. I didn't notice any negative changes when I went from the pill to the patch so I think you'd be fine. I've been on it for 5 years now.

    browneyedsquirrel on
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    TubeTube Registered User admin
    edited November 2007
    Subsidiary question; a girl I was seeing wouldn't use the pill or patch because she believes that using it for long periods of time causes increased cancer risks. Is this true?

    Tube on
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    browneyedsquirrelbrowneyedsquirrel Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I don't think Cancer is one of the increased risk but there are things like increased risk of blood clots and such things.

    Here we go:

    Some Risks: Dizziness; nausea; changes in menstruation, mood, and weight; rarely, cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure, blood clots, heart attack, and strokes


    But then that seems like the normal run of the mill risks of any medication that you hear spewed out a the end of those drug commercials.

    I personally am not too worried about it as I believe that my diet and physical activities (or lack there of) would probably have a higher influence of me developing such problems than my birth control, lol.

    browneyedsquirrel on
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    QuirkQuirk Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Subsidiary question; a girl I was seeing wouldn't use the pill or patch because she believes that using it for long periods of time causes increased cancer risks. Is this true?

    It is something like, if you use the pill etc for over 8 years it can marginally increase the risk of cervical cancer, but during the 8 years it reduces the chances of breast cancer.

    This might be backwards though, or I may have been given duff info, but I'm sure I remember reading that in
    a reputable newspaper

    Quirk on
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    CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Subsidiary question; a girl I was seeing wouldn't use the pill or patch because she believes that using it for long periods of time causes increased cancer risks. Is this true?

    A quick google search turned up this info page at the US Cancer institute:

    Link

    Here's the quick summary from it:
    Key Points

    * Some cancers depend on naturally occurring sex hormones for their development and growth. Researchers are interested in learning whether the hormones in oral contraceptives affect cancer risk in women (see Question 1).
    * Some studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer in women taking oral contraceptives, while other studies have shown no change in risk (see Question 2).
    * Oral contraceptive use has been shown in multiple studies to decrease the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer (see Question 3).
    * Oral contraceptives have been shown to increase the risk of cervical cancer; however, human papillomavirus is the major risk factor for this disease (see Question 4).
    * The risk of liver cancer is increased in women who take oral contraceptives and are otherwise considered low risk for the disease (see Question 5).

    Seems like an overall wash for cancer risk.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
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    SpecularitySpecularity Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Long-term use of hormonal birth control has actually been shown to reduce risks of uterine and ovarian cancer. However, there's still debate on its effect on breast cancer. Some sources also claim that it can increase the risk of cervical cancer.

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/oral-contraceptives

    Remember, though, that many times women who are on hormonal birth control also tend to get screened more thoroughly for the various cancers (and other issues), and so find cancer more often than women who never get checked.

    Specularity on
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    MedopineMedopine __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2007
    The site says you are given up to 60% more hormones with the patch than you get with the pill.

    Oh dang. I was thinking about trying out the patch, because I'm horrible with remembering to take pills regularly, and the hormone fluctuations really fuck up my body. But if it's that much more than the pill, then I don't think I can do the patch. I've been on Alesse for the past few years, and it's ok. Anyone else here have experience with Alesse and the patch?

    I switched to the patch from the pill because I was having undesireable side effects. With the patch things are a lot better, and I also don't have to remember to take the stupid pill (I was bad at that). If your body doesn't like the pill, maybe its because of the day to day fluctuation in hormones? With the patch it seems the rate/amt of hormones going into your body is pretty steady compared to a daily pill.

    Medopine on
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    TroyTroy Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I'm just a dude...but I'm a dude who's a nurse and works at a college clinic.

    Fuck the patch...I've seen some goofy shit with that thing. It should be the last thing you try.

    Now you want a solid alternative hit up the nuvaring.

    Nothin but love for the nuvaring.

    Troy on
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    DiscGraceDiscGrace Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Troy wrote: »

    Nothin but love for the nuvaring.

    Not enough lime in the world. I love my NuvaRing so much. It is totally not noticeable during sex, and like you Irene, I can't even remember to take a vitamin with my breakfast cereal every morning. But I can manage to notice the marked date on my calendar 2x a month! And it's even low-dose, because it's going straight to the spot. As long as you are comfortable with yourself "down there" (and there's no reason not to be!), the ring is a great option.

    DiscGrace on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    Butterfly4uButterfly4u Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Medopine wrote: »
    The site says you are given up to 60% more hormones with the patch than you get with the pill.

    Oh dang. I was thinking about trying out the patch, because I'm horrible with remembering to take pills regularly, and the hormone fluctuations really fuck up my body. But if it's that much more than the pill, then I don't think I can do the patch. I've been on Alesse for the past few years, and it's ok. Anyone else here have experience with Alesse and the patch?

    I switched to the patch from the pill because I was having undesireable side effects. With the patch things are a lot better, and I also don't have to remember to take the stupid pill (I was bad at that). If your body doesn't like the pill, maybe its because of the day to day fluctuation in hormones? With the patch it seems the rate/amt of hormones going into your body is pretty steady compared to a daily pill.

    I agree. Most girls have trouble with the pill because you get a high dose when you take it then it winds down at the end of the day. I had headache/ bitchy hour every night when I took the pill. I haven't had any problems with the patch because it gives you a steady stream of hormones. There weren't even any problems when I went off of the patch.

    Butterfly4u on
    Butterfly
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    LachesisLachesis Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I started taking Yasmin about a year ago. It's low hormone and I don't notice it at all. I had a real issue the first time i was on the pill, so i specifically asked for a low-hormone one. Of course, I'm pretty good about taking pills. haha

    Lachesis on
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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Subsidiary question; a girl I was seeing wouldn't use the pill or patch because she believes that using it for long periods of time causes increased cancer risks. Is this true?

    From my studies so far, it appears as though the birth control hormone itself (through whatever delivery) does not carry any strongly correlated cancer risks, however, it seems to aggravate the cancerous properties of known cancer causing agents, such as smoking.

    If you're likely to get breast cancer (ie, runs in the family) you are even more likely to get it while on the pill.
    See Also: Smoking
    See Also: Cervical Cancer
    See Also: Liver and Kidney problems

    My estimation is that it puts a bit more strain on the body than would be there otherwise (which makes sense as its sort of like always being in a very early stage of pregnancy) so the little things that would almost cause problems but wouldn't, start to actually cause problems.

    Sarcastro on
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    corcorigancorcorigan Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Sarcastro wrote: »
    Subsidiary question; a girl I was seeing wouldn't use the pill or patch because she believes that using it for long periods of time causes increased cancer risks. Is this true?

    From my studies so far, it appears as though the birth control hormone itself (through whatever delivery) does not carry any strongly correlated cancer risks, however, it seems to aggravate the cancerous properties of known cancer causing agents, such as smoking.

    If you're likely to get breast cancer (ie, runs in the family) you are even more likely to get it while on the pill.
    See Also: Smoking
    See Also: Cervical Cancer
    See Also: Liver and Kidney problems

    My estimation is that it puts a bit more strain on the body than would be there otherwise (which makes sense as its sort of like always being in a very early stage of pregnancy) so the little things that would almost cause problems but wouldn't, start to actually cause problems.

    I've no idea if this was taken account of by the studies (I'd hope so) but:

    Assume most women on the pill are sexually active (more so than those not on it). Sexually active people can get HPV, which is known to be the trigger for the majority of cervical cancers.

    So it might be a correlation without there actually being a link.

    Anyway, there is my unsupported possible issue with links between hormonal contraceptives and cervical cancer.

    corcorigan on
    Ad Astra Per Aspera
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2007
    Subsidiary question; a girl I was seeing wouldn't use the pill or patch because she believes that using it for long periods of time causes increased cancer risks. Is this true?

    Load of tripe based on outdated research and solely promoted by anti-abortion activists, who are usually also anti-contraception. There was a recent Danish (i think) study, a really large and well-designed one, that discredited the hypotheses about breast cancer entirely, and the research previous to that was really inconclusive - it was mostly just a hypothesis that hadn't been tested. Its also well-established to lend some protection against other repro-system cancers, ovarian in particular, because it basically puts them on hold. The massive hormone fluctuations associated with pregnancy are actually a far larger risk factor for cancer (similarly, going through a pregnancy is roughly ten times more likely to kill you in various inventive ways than getting an abortion). Not to put anyone off pregnancy since both risks are pretty small, but its worth getting that out there.


    There is a risk of blood clots in women who smoke that really shouldn't be ignored, though. Anyone who smokes and is considering hormonal BC should quit smoking before going on it.

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2007
    Long-term use of hormonal birth control has actually been shown to reduce risks of uterine and ovarian cancer. However, there's still debate on its effect on breast cancer. Some sources also claim that it can increase the risk of cervical cancer.

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/oral-contraceptives

    Remember, though, that many times women who are on hormonal birth control also tend to get screened more thoroughly for the various cancers (and other issues), and so find cancer more often than women who never get checked.

    Also, women on BC are less likely to insist on condoms, leaving them at greater risk for HPV, which causes cervical cancer. Once Gardasil is common in the population that link may lessen or disappear, but it'll be decades before that shows up in the stats.

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    MimMim I prefer my lovers… dead.Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Question, and I don't mean to derail the thread entirely but I felt it was better to write the question here than start a new thread.

    What about weight gain? Does ALL birth control cause women to gain weight or just the pill/patch/what have you?

    Mim on
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    corcorigancorcorigan Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Mim wrote: »
    Question, and I don't mean to derail the thread entirely but I felt it was better to write the question here than start a new thread.

    What about weight gain? Does ALL birth control cause women to gain weight or just the pill/patch/what have you?

    Probably depends on the actual hormones involved, and their levels.

    The pill of the 1960s was entirely oestrogen, and tended to make women put on weight for example.

    corcorigan on
    Ad Astra Per Aspera
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    Butterfly4uButterfly4u Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Whether or not you gain weight also depends on the woman. I put 20 Lbs. on with the depo shot, but I haven't gained any weight on any other birth control methods.

    Butterfly4u on
    Butterfly
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    SmashismSmashism Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Whether or not you gain weight also depends on the woman. I put 20 Lbs. on with the depo shot, but I haven't gained any weight on any other birth control methods.

    When my lady went on the pill she put on a good 10 lbs. A lot of it went to her chest, so I didn't complain (not that I would).
    Due to some migraine problems my GF has switched pills around, throwing her weight (and bust) up and down like crazy. Pill has been around forever, and it's as safe and easy as it can get I guess. Some people do have reactions to any kind of medication, we couldn't figure out what was causing her migraines for months.

    Nice to see everyone staying safe:P

    Smashism on
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    SpecularitySpecularity Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    @ Smashism: I'm on the shot for migraines primarily, so if she's still struggling with those it might be worth a try.


    As far as weight gain goes, what I've heard, and what my personal experience has been, is that the shot increases your appetite, rather than causing you to retain water or fat. I seem to hear a lot of comments about the negative effects of the pill, etc, but remember too that it's rare for someone to go out of their way to say, "I stayed the same weight on Ortho Evra! Neato!" And because HBC is putting hormones in your body which do control a lot of weight/mood/etc, everyone is going to react very differently.

    Specularity on
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    The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2007
    Mim wrote: »
    Question, and I don't mean to derail the thread entirely but I felt it was better to write the question here than start a new thread.

    What about weight gain? Does ALL birth control cause women to gain weight or just the pill/patch/what have you?

    Its psychosomatic in almost all cases, acoording to the latest stuff. Women go on the pill, gain weight due to other lifestyle changes happening at the same time (or they were already slowly getting fatter, as most people do over their lives), and then blame the pill. Also, some are so paranoid about it that they basically think themselves fat. Unconciously being less active and eating more, sort of thing. Myths are powerful :? Anyway, I've never had a problem. All the weight gain I've ever experienced can be traced back to the cafe at uni :P

    The Cat on
    tmsig.jpg
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    FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    Long-term use of hormonal birth control has actually been shown to reduce risks of uterine and ovarian cancer. However, there's still debate on its effect on breast cancer. Some sources also claim that it can increase the risk of cervical cancer.

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/oral-contraceptives

    Remember, though, that many times women who are on hormonal birth control also tend to get screened more thoroughly for the various cancers (and other issues), and so find cancer more often than women who never get checked.

    Also, women on BC are less likely to insist on condoms, leaving them at greater risk for HPV, which causes cervical cancer. Once Gardasil is common in the population that link may lessen or disappear, but it'll be decades before that shows up in the stats.

    There's a similar link between birth control and liver cancer that is likely due to higher hepatitis rates in sexually active women, not to any directly carcinogenic properties of the birth control itself.

    Feral on
    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
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