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HD Questions

DeI2anGeDDeI2anGeD Registered User regular
edited January 2008 in Games and Technology
I have a few questions about HD content that has been really bugging me lately.

Alright, films are shot at 24 frames per second. 720p and 1080p are 60hz or 60 refreshes a second. When movies have portions that are shot in digital, as opposed to the entire film being digital, I've noticed a problem. The example is Harry Potter and the Dragonthing on the roof on Bluray.

So I don't know anything about harry potter, sue me. I was watching the clip at a Best Buy, when I noticed that the dragon on the roof was really really smooth and consistent and high quality, whereas harry, despite being high quality, was not very smooth. There was a lot of blur in his movement. It wasn't crisp like the dragon. I also noticed the Chicken Little clip was awesomely smooth and crisp.

Now, am I understanding this correctly? Are only movies shot in digital worth watching on at 720p or 1080p due to the higher framerate?

Another question: How the hell does upscaling work? Why would anyone want it?

My understanding is that you can't improve quality that wasn't there in the first place. So how would upscaling a 480p image to 1080p look decent? My imagination sees a 32x32 megaman image blown up to 72x72. Or Digital Zoom, or something.

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-PSN&360&steam: dei2anged
DeI2anGeD on

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    DeusfauxDeusfaux Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    720p and 1080p arent necessarily 60fps. Higher quality displays like a line of Sony LCDs can do 1080p 24fps

    upscaling ups the resolution from a lower one to a higher one. It's visual quality would be between the native lower resolution, and the higher resolution natively.

    You watch regular dvds at better quality than you could with an normal non-upscaling dvd player, but not as good as an HD version of the same movie on an HD player.

    Deusfaux on
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    GlalGlal AiredaleRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Upscaling is primarily done because LCDs scale lower resolutions up really poorly. I imagine they also do filtering to deinterlace the image and other tricks to improve the end result.

    Regarding HP, I'd guess it's more of a composition problem, rather than a framerate one.

    Glal on
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    DeI2anGeDDeI2anGeD Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I guess I wasn't too clear and I completely misunderstood progressive scan versus interlace (A quick trip to Wikipedia solved that problem). Thanks for the heads up. I'm still curious as to the Harry Potter Dragon Phenomenon, but I'll have to book up further to figure out why it would look the way it did.

    Although, I understand that an upscaling dvd player will display the 480p DVD at 1080p, my question is -how- does it make it "better quality"? I mean, it's the same source video, just scaled higher. Wouldn't it make more sense to watch the 480p dvd at 480p and not 1080p?

    Edit: Glal, that makes a lot of sense. I use an LCD monitor myself and at lower resolutions it's wretched. So, for a DLP and LCD TVs, a quality upscaler would just make it appear like proper 480p. Am I getting that correctly? That it's not so much for making it "look like 1080p" as it is "Making sure it retains quality"

    DeI2anGeD on
    321429-1.png

    -PSN&360&steam: dei2anged
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    corin7corin7 San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    DeI2anGeD wrote: »
    I guess I wasn't too clear and I completely misunderstood progressive scan versus interlace (A quick trip to Wikipedia solved that problem). Thanks for the heads up. I'm still curious as to the Harry Potter Dragon Phenomenon, but I'll have to book up further to figure out why it would look the way it did.

    Although, I understand that an upscaling dvd player will display the 480p DVD at 1080p, my question is -how- does it make it "better quality"? I mean, it's the same source video, just scaled higher. Wouldn't it make more sense to watch the 480p dvd at 480p and not 1080p?

    When it upconverts it, it just copies the pixles and repeats them. So the resolution fits the TV better but it is not using the real data.

    corin7 on
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    Shooter McgavinShooter Mcgavin Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    DeI2anGeD wrote: »
    I guess I wasn't too clear and I completely misunderstood progressive scan versus interlace (A quick trip to Wikipedia solved that problem). Thanks for the heads up. I'm still curious as to the Harry Potter Dragon Phenomenon, but I'll have to book up further to figure out why it would look the way it did.

    Although, I understand that an upscaling dvd player will display the 480p DVD at 1080p, my question is -how- does it make it "better quality"? I mean, it's the same source video, just scaled higher. Wouldn't it make more sense to watch the 480p dvd at 480p and not 1080p?


    No, because if you have a TV that is 1080p and watch something in 480p, it creates a problem in that the pixels of the movie are way bigger than the pixels on the display. So what the display tries to do is devote 3 or 4 1080 pixels to create one single 480 pixel (sorry for lack of official terms), and the result is usually a very poor quality image.

    Edit: This is why you hear people say that you should always use the "native resolution" of the display. One pixel equals one pixel, instead of one pixel equaling 3/4 pixels.

    Shooter Mcgavin on
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    Mr_GrinchMr_Grinch Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Stolen from a website:

    The Practical Effect Of DVD Upscaling

    Visually, there is very little difference to the eye of the average consumer between 720p and 1080i. However, 720p can deliver a slightly smoother-looking image, due to the fact that lines and pixels are displayed in a consecutive pattern, rather than in an alternate pattern.

    The upscaling process does a good job of matching the upscaled pixel output of a DVD player to the native pixel display resolution of an HDTV capable television, resulting in better detail and color consistency.

    However, upscaling, as it is currently implemented, cannot convert standard DVD images into true high-definition images. In fact, although upscaling works well with fixed pixel displays, such as Plasma and LCD televisions, results are not always consistent on CRT-based high definition televisions.



    DVDs look better upscaled on my Samsung LCD than they did on my old CRT not because (at least I believe):

    My upscaling DVD player is damn good and does a top notch job. Obviously you can't improve on quality that isn't there which bring me to my second point

    Newer TVs are sharper, cleaner and displays colours MUCH better than most older CRTs, so whilst the upscaling procedure may not add anything to the quality, the tv does.

    Mr_Grinch on
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