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Going snowboarding for first time

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    RaneadosRaneados police apologist you shouldn't have been there, obviouslyRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    ps step-ins aren't necessary, strap in bindings take like 15 seconds to do up

    if you get snowboarding pants, make sure they have zippers

    IMPORTANT

    Raneados on
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    RaneadosRaneados police apologist you shouldn't have been there, obviouslyRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    also if you smoke, take a carton

    cigarettes cost $texas up near the slopes

    Raneados on
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    LavaKnightLavaKnight Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    mts wrote: »
    so how are you going snowboarding if you don't have bindings or boots? showing up to the mountain without them is just asking to get raped buying gear onsite.

    I was under the impression I could rent those separately... Like I said, first time snowboarding.

    I don't know how this shit works.

    re: try and steer with your back foot
    Those are the kind of hints I'm looking for, and maybe what the wook was trying to say.

    Yeah, the biggest tips I would be able to give you have been mentioned.

    1. Pointing with your rear arm in the direction you want to go helps with balance and also aids in turning which you should do with...

    2. Your rear leg. You should visualize your legs moving apart from each other (one forward, one back) when you want to turn. It's tough to do because your legs are tied down and don't actually move anywhere, but try to bring your back leg forward to turn.

    Try doing short little turns at first. Go down the hill and before you collect too much speed turn into a gradual stop. Then, turn your body and back leg back the way you came from, and go down the same way but with the opposite leg forward. Like a falling leaf you should make slow S turns to get used to turning and slowing down.

    But have fun with it! Nobody really gets it on their first try, but it's an activity that's worth it to learn. Nothing beats going down the slopes in fresh powder.

    LavaKnight on
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    If you do end up going regularly, I find that doing core exercises on my spare time helps a ton. The whole thing becomes so much easier.

    ege02 on
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    Angel177Angel177 Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    as someone who had never been to the mountians let alone snowboarded all i can say is this...


    you can teach yourself but chat with the staff, all of them ski or board and they give you all the advice in like 10 minsof chatting that a instructor gives in half a day.

    Fuck the bunny hill, bunny hills are like packed snow and ice, your ass and arms will hate you, just jump into a green or blue hill the riders there can avoid you easier than the little fuckers on the bunny hill.

    get soft volleyball or soccer knee pads, they make a fall easy to take and you can kneel as well as sit when you need a break, oh and if you fall break it with your forearms not your wrists.

    hope this helps

    good luck and have fun.

    Angel177 on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    also, i agree about staying off the "bunny slope" going slow is one of the hardest things for beginers to get eh hang of. its way easier t figure things out with a bit of speed as you can get a arve going, go slow and you will fall down. that being said, don't be that asshole boarder who goes fast since they can't turn and is a danger to everyone. its a fine line.

    the hardest thing for most beginers is the transition from edge to edge. once you hit that flat bit you pick up speed and that freaks a lot of people out.

    don't get step in bindings. they don't have nearly the same performance and typical bindings and will get sloppy by the end of the season.

    mts on
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    mts wrote: »
    don't get step in bindings. they don't have nearly the same performance and typical bindings and will get sloppy by the end of the season.

    At absolute beginner level the performance difference between step-ins and strap-ons will not be noticeable at all, while the convenience will save him a lot of time and trouble.

    ege02 on
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    VThornheartVThornheart Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    The oldschool test is the guy running the rental shop sneaks up behind you and gives you a shove. Which ever foot you put forward to stop yourself falling over is your leading foot.

    So what do you do if you don't react in time to put a foot forward and fall flat on your face?

    (that's what would happen to an uncoordinated schmoltz like me, I know it :lol:)

    VThornheart on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    ins0mniac wrote: »

    Christ. I was thinking maybe an old cushion shoved down the back of your pants, but $50 worth of cyborg-ass is cool too.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    The oldschool test is the guy running the rental shop sneaks up behind you and gives you a shove. Which ever foot you put forward to stop yourself falling over is your leading foot.

    So what do you do if you don't react in time to put a foot forward and fall flat on your face?

    (that's what would happen to an uncoordinated schmoltz like me, I know it :lol:)

    They strap the board to your head.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    TarantioTarantio Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Everyone's suggesting wrist guards... now, I've never gone snowboarding (I'll be skiing for the first time next month) but isn't it pretty much always a bad idea to catch yourself with your hand when you fall? I've learned that from martial arts, and the OP said he's done that.

    Is falling on your wrists just unavoidable?

    Edit: Ok, looks like Lodbrok feels the same way I do, only with actual experience. Yeah, for those of you who are catching yourselves on your hands, it's generally better to slap the ground with your arms when falling backwards. I've been taught that this absorbs the shock, but I think it might just be that accelerating your arms downward accelerates your torso upwards, so your vitals don't hit with as much force.

    Falling forward, it's probable better to try to go for a shoulder roll, but I can't really tell how feasible that would be.

    Somebody with more experience should probably explain the specifics here, seems like there's a potential for preventing a lot of wrist injuries.

    Tarantio on
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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Tarantio wrote: »
    Falling forward, it's probable better to try to go for a shoulder roll, but I can't really tell how feasible that would be.

    Not very.

    The tricky part is that both your legs are fixed to the board when you go over, plus they're spread and you're lower to the ground than you would be if standing. It makes it difficult to get yourself in the right position quickly enough, especially if you catch an edge.

    It's doable, and if you watch boarders spill it's quite often what they do, but that's more by accident than design.

    Swinging your arms back when falling backwards is a nice tip, though. I'll remember that when and if I get back on a board.

    japan on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    yea but step ins are really not that much more convenient and if he is buying why should he buy a piece of shit first then spend more money to buy a real pair of bindings

    mts on
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    mts wrote: »
    yea but step ins are really not that much more convenient and if he is buying why should he buy a piece of shit first then spend more money to buy a real pair of bindings

    He is not buying. He is renting.

    And stop being so pretentiously backward-minded. Step-ins are as "real" as strap-ons. I've used both and noticed virtually no difference and I've been snowboarding for six years.

    The convenience is huge. Not having to steer to the sidelines after getting off the lift, sitting down, strapping them on, getting back up, and then awkwardly jumping and paddling myself towards the slope saves a lot of time and energy. I can instead use my momentum from the lift, step into the binding on the go, and voila.

    ege02 on
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    JediNightJediNight Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I saw gloves with wrist guards at the store, they were $85 though.

    I've got a jacket, pants, and a barely used board I bought from a friend last year (Burton Custom I think).

    Are they ski/snowboard clothing?
    Snowboard gloves are the best. If you do any kind of winter activity, you should own some pretty much regardless.

    Yeah I went back to Skiing for that reason. It wasn't worth it to me to be able to fall down that easily, and your chances of getting hurt snowboarding are much higher than skiing due to the riding stance. When you fall you're either breaking your wrists or getting a concussion ;p

    PS: Snowboard gloves are awesome and I use them all the time in winter. I hated having those puny thinsulate gloves that always seem to leave a gap between your jacket and hand. Snowboarding gloves are nice and thick and have the snow guard that ties down well over your wrist to keep you nice and warm. Best $50 I ever spent for winter.

    JediNight on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    japan wrote: »
    Tarantio wrote: »
    Falling forward, it's probable better to try to go for a shoulder roll, but I can't really tell how feasible that would be.

    Not very.

    The tricky part is that both your legs are fixed to the board when you go over, plus they're spread and you're lower to the ground than you would be if standing. It makes it difficult to get yourself in the right position quickly enough, especially if you catch an edge.

    Actually, the tricky part is that if you haven't spent weeks at martial arts classes learning how to fall, you won't be able to easily break the instinct to throw a hand out when you go down. I don't think it's a massive issue for general downhill skiing, though - the main trick is to try to not let your momentum stop to rapidly. If you fall, just try to keep tumbling or sliding (even if it's on your ass or face) downhill, that way the energy is taken out of the fall and you don't break anything by stopping suddenly. If that means throwing a hand out to push your body in the direction of the slope or to flip yourself into a tumble as you meet the ground, so be it. You'd only really need to work on more conclusive break-falls if you get into big airs and such, where you could be in a situation where you're falling eight feet straight down or whatever.

    A couple of tricks I learned pretty quick are if you're sliding downhill, rotate yourself so you're sliding head first. Now you can dig the edge of your board in - just lift your legs and slam the board back down into the snow - and come to a stop even if the slope is really icy. Alternatively, rotate yourself so you are sliding feet first. Now when you dig the edge of the board in, it'll flip you back up onto your feet (much easier to do if you are sliding on your back than your front in my experience).

    Never try to stand up unless your board is at right angles to the slope.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    Buy gloves with which you can wipe your nose.

    I'm serious. Some gloves come with special ultra-absorbent cloth material (usually at the base of the thumb) that you can use.

    ege02 on
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    NrthstarNrthstar Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    JediNight wrote: »
    I saw gloves with wrist guards at the store, they were $85 though.

    I've got a jacket, pants, and a barely used board I bought from a friend last year (Burton Custom I think).

    Are they ski/snowboard clothing?
    Snowboard gloves are the best. If you do any kind of winter activity, you should own some pretty much regardless.

    Yeah I went back to Skiing for that reason. It wasn't worth it to me to be able to fall down that easily, and your chances of getting hurt snowboarding are much higher than skiing due to the riding stance. When you fall you're either breaking your wrists or getting a concussion ;p

    PS: Snowboard gloves are awesome and I use them all the time in winter. I hated having those puny thinsulate gloves that always seem to leave a gap between your jacket and hand. Snowboarding gloves are nice and thick and have the snow guard that ties down well over your wrist to keep you nice and warm. Best $50 I ever spent for winter.

    I've always felt the opposite about falling/injuries when it comes to skiing/snowboarding. Perhaps that's just because of the way I learend to tumble while snowboarding. When i fall snowboarding I keep my arms in fairly close to my body (which they should be anyways, if you're arms are out away from you, you're "throwing your body" too much rather than simply shifting your weight/board.) Overcompensating will flatten you faster than you have time to respond. By keeping my arms in, when I go down, I tumble/roll so that my board is underneath me before I've lost my momentum so I'm on the go with little effort.

    When I ski'ed and fell, I felt more out of control and damaged my shoulder far more. That could just be a personal thing though and it certainly can be different for everyone.

    Another good glove suggestion is goggle wipping gloves. My gloves have a small rubber "blade" on them to act like a windshield wiper for my mask. If you're worried about nose wipes, just grow a beard and forget about it till you get off the mountain. It sounds gross, but my beard is my greatest snowboarding tool haha.

    Oh and for you smokers (which I'm glad to say I've officially and finally kicked that habit) there's a new mitten snowboarding glove out that has a metal wrapped whole between your index finger and middle finger that fits a ciggarette perfectly.

    Something else to always remember, it takes more muscle to go slowly down the mountain than it does to simple accept the speed and use your leg strength to adjust your course.

    Nrthstar on
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    Bouncing_SoulBouncing_Soul Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Wow thanks for all the suggestions everyone.

    I know there's nothing that will make me "good" when I start but at least I can be prepared for everything and know what to look out for.

    Oh, and the gloves that I bought do have a pad type thing on the thumb to wipe off goggles (and can maybe even used for my nose, I dunno).

    Bouncing_Soul on
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    VThornheartVThornheart Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    The oldschool test is the guy running the rental shop sneaks up behind you and gives you a shove. Which ever foot you put forward to stop yourself falling over is your leading foot.

    So what do you do if you don't react in time to put a foot forward and fall flat on your face?

    (that's what would happen to an uncoordinated schmoltz like me, I know it :lol:)

    They strap the board to your head.

    (Reminds himself to not attempt snowboarding in the near future) =)

    VThornheart on
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    ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    If you get to carving, just remember what it was like when you got horribly drunk... How you were able to walk nearly leaning 90 degrees to your left? That is how you carve. Dont' worry about falling down, just switch back and forth, loosey-goosey.

    You will fall, it will hurt. But consider this, snow hurts a hell of a lot less than cement, and I would know... After years of snowboarding I took up Longboarding this summer, cement is much less forgiving. On those notes, get a helmet, riding without one is retarded (the majority of real boarders wear them). Wrist braces are a neat idea, but I've never bothered to get them... You really just learn to fall.

    As per bindings, do not get step ins, they have less control and for a beginner that equals more time on your tail bone and face. I've never heard of a place renting just the bindings, so you may want to call ahead.

    If you find yourself on powder, you may love it, or hate it. Either way, shift your weight to your back foot, otherwise you will find yourself buried and at a dead stop.

    And the best advice: If all else fails, you can always slide down on your back edge at a constant pace. I had to do this in the mountains whenever we hit moggles, they REALLY suck on a board.

    Comahawk on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    Buy gloves with which you can wipe your nose.

    I'm serious. Some gloves come with special ultra-absorbent cloth material (usually at the base of the thumb) that you can use.

    Last time I bought any snowboarding gear, I got a great pair of gloves. I think they were burtons. Got a little mini windshield wiper on the thumb - proper little rubber blade - for cleaning snow and sleet off your goggles. Brilliant.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    Buy gloves with which you can wipe your nose.

    I'm serious. Some gloves come with special ultra-absorbent cloth material (usually at the base of the thumb) that you can use.

    Last time I bought any snowboarding gear, I got a great pair of gloves. I think they were burtons. Got a little mini windshield wiper on the thumb - proper little rubber blade - for cleaning snow and sleet off your goggles. Brilliant.

    Have you ever used it?

    I can't think of once when that would of been necessary, and I've been boarding for ten years.

    Comahawk on
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    LodbrokLodbrok Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Special gloves for smokers? Hm, if you can not be without your cancer-sticks at least when doing an activity such as skiing, I think it is time to start cutting back... the things they come up with these days never cease to amaze me. Anyway...

    Step-in bindings. I've never even tried them myself, but I thought they more or less equal to normal bindings performance vice these days? One thing to keep in mind is that systems from different manufacturers are not compatible, so if you buy them you will limit yourself a bit unless you replace both your boots and bindings at the same time. As for saving time, that should not really be an issue once you been riding for a while. Strapping into normal bindings take maybe ten seconds, and you should not even have to sit down to do it unless the slope is very steep.

    And if you do get the chance to ride in powder, do it! This is where boards really shine. Skiing in loose snow is hard work, and the technique is pretty hard to master compared to riding a board in deep snow. As long as you keep the nose of the board up, it is just a matter of going with the flow and relax. Actually, this is true for riding a board in general, at the end of a day skiing I am usually very tired, after a day of snowboarding I am not tired at all....

    Lodbrok on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    Comahawk wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    Buy gloves with which you can wipe your nose.

    I'm serious. Some gloves come with special ultra-absorbent cloth material (usually at the base of the thumb) that you can use.

    Last time I bought any snowboarding gear, I got a great pair of gloves. I think they were burtons. Got a little mini windshield wiper on the thumb - proper little rubber blade - for cleaning snow and sleet off your goggles. Brilliant.

    Have you ever used it?

    I can't think of once when that would of been necessary, and I've been boarding for ten years.

    Sure, if you snowboarding early morning in Switzerland around February time, there's a good chance that there'll be a fair bit of snow still falling and it'll be pretty cold to boot (so you don't want to take your gloves off if you can avoid it). Or if you just fell flat on your face in powder, it's an easy way to scrape it off your goggles. Or if you're snowboarding in Scotland and it's raining.

    I've been in plenty of situations where you find yourself wiping snow of your goggles or sunglasses. Doing it with the rough material of snowboarding gloves isn't too easy (and will damage good quality lenses to boot), so usually you'd take the gloves off and wipe it with either your fingers or soft material elsewhere on your person. The rubber blade, like the snot-pad, just makes it easier to clean yourself up without exposing your fingers to the cold.

    I mean, I wouldn't list it as a must have, but they're excellent gloves even without the wiper blade. If you're snowboarding in sterile conditions - say, Switzerland early April when you can basically snowboard in a tshirt - then it probably isn't too necessary but for those situations where you really need the cold-weather gear - when it's genuinely cold, there's a strong wind, snow is falling hard and any exposed flesh starts to chill quickly - then it suddenly makes sense.

    I've never been in a situation where I'd need a GPS beacon, but I get why those guys who go helicopter boarding carry them.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Comahawk wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    Buy gloves with which you can wipe your nose.

    I'm serious. Some gloves come with special ultra-absorbent cloth material (usually at the base of the thumb) that you can use.

    Last time I bought any snowboarding gear, I got a great pair of gloves. I think they were burtons. Got a little mini windshield wiper on the thumb - proper little rubber blade - for cleaning snow and sleet off your goggles. Brilliant.

    Have you ever used it?

    I can't think of once when that would of been necessary, and I've been boarding for ten years.

    I have to (at least in my personal experience) agree with this... the bigger problem for me has almost always been fogging inside the goggles, not stuff on the outside. And I grew up skiing in the northeast, where there's a lot more snowmaking (which is really the worst thing for getting iced onto goggles) and horrible weather. It's not something that would make a good pair of gloves bad, but in the list of necessary things I'd put it pretty far down

    Snowboarding gloves, though, are a definite plus - I bought a pair a couple years ago, and they've been SO much warmer (and stayed so much drier, which is almost more important) it's unbelievable. I really only noticed it last year skiing with a couple friends, when they were commenting their fingers were wet and freezing while the inside of mine were totally dry.

    And that nose-wiping thing is true as well, though I think even most (non-$5) ski gloves also have those now... but it usually stays much drier than the rest of the glove, which makes it a lot nicer for wiping your nose with than a glove covered in melted snow

    Gdiguy on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    Comahawk wrote: »
    And the best advice: If all else fails, you can always slide down on your back edge at a constant pace. I had to do this in the mountains whenever we hit moggles, they REALLY suck on a board.

    Ermm. Moguls are hell, but slide-slipping trough them is pretty much the worst. You need to be loose and flexible to ride moguls, absorbing the bumps independently with each leg, traversing the field at a diagonal to control speed and turning on big ones. Slide-slipping through them means your legs are going to be rigid, you're attacking it from the worst angle - straight down - and you'll pretty much have the worst ride ever.

    Either way, they aren't for beginners, that's for sure. They're intensive business.

    Slide-slipping is definitely a required skill, but so is having the courage and knowledge to attack a slope correctly. Another situation where you inadvisably might resort to slide-slipping would be on a steep black run - you panic at the extreme angle and decide to slide-slip down. Then you spend the rest of the holiday in rehab because you completely over-worked your leg muscles fighting gravity for half an hour, basically clinging to the side of a snow cliff. In that situation, it's much better to just cross your chest, flick the board up in the air, point it straight down the hill and go for it. You'll be at the bottom in about 30 seconds, either still on your board or on your ass (tip - if you get to the bottom on your ass, you shouldn't have been attempting a black run in the first place ;) ).

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    LodbrokLodbrok Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    In my opinion, it is seldom a good idea to "slide-slip" at all. Sure, maybe there is a really steep and narrow passage that you do not feel confident taking on, and then I guess it is okay. But stay away from places where you need to do it alot, or even better, keep in the fall-line of the slope! Make short, controlled turns. You might fall a lot, since the slope is steep and you are not going very fast you are unlikely to hurt yourself. The point is that it is when you are riding on the limit of your ability that you develop skill, and in the beginning you are likely to unnecessary scared of steep slopes and just freeze up instead of trying to make proper turns.

    Moguls can be pretty fun on a board, but like Szechuanosaurus said, you need to very relaxed. If you are confident in your board and yourself it is not that hard to do it just like on skies, straight down the fall-line. Still, not something I would recommend for a beginner, and you will never have the same control as you would on a pair of skies.

    Lodbrok on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    Yeah, slide-slipping is really only useful for getting into position at the top of a run. It teaches some control of the board - it's basically the position you need to get into to stop at the end of a run, for example - and it's a good exercise for getting the initial feel of the board when you're first starting out, but beyond that it's more of a hindrance. Snowboards are designed to go down a hill nose first, not sideways.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    The Raging PlatypusThe Raging Platypus Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Comahawk wrote: »
    And the best advice: If all else fails, you can always slide down on your back edge at a constant pace. I had to do this in the mountains whenever we hit moggles, they REALLY suck on a board.

    Ermm. Moguls are hell, but slide-slipping trough them is pretty much the worst. You need to be loose and flexible to ride moguls, absorbing the bumps independently with each leg, traversing the field at a diagonal to control speed and turning on big ones. Slide-slipping through them means your legs are going to be rigid, you're attacking it from the worst angle - straight down - and you'll pretty much have the worst ride ever.

    Either way, they aren't for beginners, that's for sure. They're intensive business.

    Slide-slipping is definitely a required skill, but so is having the courage and knowledge to attack a slope correctly. Another situation where you inadvisably might resort to slide-slipping would be on a steep black run - you panic at the extreme angle and decide to slide-slip down. Then you spend the rest of the holiday in rehab because you completely over-worked your leg muscles fighting gravity for half an hour, basically clinging to the side of a snow cliff. In that situation, it's much better to just cross your chest, flick the board up in the air, point it straight down the hill and go for it. You'll be at the bottom in about 30 seconds, either still on your board or on your ass (tip - if you get to the bottom on your ass, you shouldn't have been attempting a black run in the first place ;) ).

    This.

    Szech is right on the button here. I was an avid skiier before I started boarding, and the learning curve at the beginning was very, very painful. It wasn't until I decided to stop slide-slipping at every difficult turn that I really began to get the hang of it. Take a deep breath, say a small prayer, plant that lead foot down and attack the slope. Slide-slipping too much will have you wishing for a pair of crutches by the end of the day. Knees bent, small tight curves, and eventually you'll get to the point where it almost feels like your board is floating on air.

    And those gloves with the wiper-thumbs? Ace. I was up at Whiteface earlier this year, and we were getting pounded with snow during the day. Being able to wipe off your goggles cleanly from time to time was a lifesaver.

    The Raging Platypus on
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    Bouncing_SoulBouncing_Soul Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Just bringing this back from the dead to share my experience...

    So I only went for one day and had step-ins. I spent about 2 hours maybe on the bunny slope and took one really bad fall backwards and landed on my left wrist. I didn't have much time to react. After that intense pain I got wrist guards and headed to the mountain. It was late so there was only the slightly less easy easy trail for me to take.

    I was pretty terrified but I have to say I did pretty damn well, went flying down the mountain with good balance and didn't fall as much as I thought I would have. All but one was uncontrolled. My turning leaves a lot to be desired but I can carve into them pretty hard when I had to. I was even able to stop at the bottom, I was more comfortable stopping with my front edge to the mountain.
    Oh, turns out I broke my wrist but it's not bad, it's a fracture of the radius with no displacement.

    All in all I had a great time and just wanted to thank everyone for their help.

    Bouncing_Soul on
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    12gauge12gauge Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Just bringing this back from the dead to share my experience...

    So I only went for one day and had step-ins. I spent about 2 hours maybe on the bunny slope and took one really bad fall backwards and landed on my left wrist. I didn't have much time to react. After that intense pain I got wrist guards and headed to the mountain. It was late so there was only the slightly less easy easy trail for me to take.

    I was pretty terrified but I have to say I did pretty damn well, went flying down the mountain with good balance and didn't fall as much as I thought I would have. All but one was uncontrolled. My turning leaves a lot to be desired but I can carve into them pretty hard when I had to. I was even able to stop at the bottom, I was more comfortable stopping with my front edge to the mountain.
    Oh, turns out I broke my wrist but it's not bad, it's a fracture of the radius with no displacement.

    All in all I had a great time and just wanted to thank everyone for their help.

    The broken wrist was the thing I wanted to warn you after reading the whole thread right now - exactly the same thing happened to a friend of mine.

    BTW: Does anyone know where I can get alpine bindings over the internet? The only thing I could find where freestyle bindings....

    12gauge on
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    NrthstarNrthstar Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I think I've only ever smoked once while boarding, but I thought the mittens were funny. Plus it reminded me of a dude I met at the park at Snowshoe, WV. Every run he'd make, he'd light up his cigarette first. I asked him why and he said it calmed him down before he made his run. I didn't argue with him since he was damn impressive at the park.

    My first bindings were burtons SI-X step ins. For step ins they weren't bad, but I generally hated them. They really didn't allow any flexibility in adjustments. Plus having a foot come out at the top of black diamond really scares the shit out of you. (snow was packed up in the tread of my boot so the binding didn't completely connect).

    If you're looking for quick in/out bindings check out some Flow's. One quick hook and you're in. I rode a pair for a season and they worked ok.

    Nrthstar on
    "Shut up and Die"
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2008
    Fuck, bad luck on the broken wrist man. I guess wrist guards are a good idea.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    DodgeBlanDodgeBlan PSN: dodgeblanRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I hope you learnt your lesson
    :P

    DodgeBlan on
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    Bouncing_SoulBouncing_Soul Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Yeah, I learned that the bunny hill is an icy deathtrap, yet I can survive on the mountain.

    Bouncing_Soul on
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    NrthstarNrthstar Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    That blows bought the wrist, but it's a clean break, so really it's one of those injuries that you can milk if you want for days off from work, or just pretty much ignore after getting it set.

    I've never broken a wrist before from boarding. Concussions (they're right, buy a helmet). Yes. Badly bruised and swollen knees. Yes. Luck of the draw I guess.

    Nrthstar on
    "Shut up and Die"
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