Options

Eee PC: anyone have one?

145791055

Posts

  • Options
    seasleepyseasleepy Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I assume I can't just install the copy of windows I have on my desktop.
    I think you should be able to, although if you want, you can try nlite to shrink down the Windows install a bit. The manual that comes with the Eee also has some instructions for things you can do to save space if you install Windows (relocating My Documents and IE temp files, compressing the HD, etc). The DVD that comes with it has Windows drivers.
    And if I install windows I lose all the pre-installed software etc?
    Yup, but there is a restore image on the DVD, so you can get it back if you want.

    seasleepy on
    Steam | Nintendo: seasleepy | PSN: seasleepy1
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    seasleepy wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I assume I can't just install the copy of windows I have on my desktop.
    I think you should be able to, although if you want, you can try nlite to shrink down the Windows install a bit. The manual that comes with the Eee also has some instructions for things you can do to save space if you install Windows (relocating My Documents and IE temp files, compressing the HD, etc). The DVD that comes with it has Windows drivers.
    And if I install windows I lose all the pre-installed software etc?
    Yup, but there is a restore image on the DVD, so you can get it back if you want.

    Keep in mind that the eee has no optical drive so you'll need a USB DVD-ROM drive.

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Thanks. So I'll get one, install English Windows on it, shrunk down with nlite (I found a step-by-step guide on how to do this). The pre-installed stuff still might be in Japanese (and installing Japanese software on an English OS is usually annoying - lots of prompts with unreadable random characters).

    I'll get a USB Drive to transfer stuff from my desktop and mount images etc. What kind of size is a minimum? I know you can also expand the machine with an SD card - is SD memory much more expensive than USB drive memory?

    Sorry about all the dumb questions.

    poshniallo on
    I figure I could take a bear.
  • Options
    PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    FYI, Eeepc 701 black should be on display at BestBuy. Mine had one. Sold out, but display was there.

    I really have to contemplate buying a 901 now. The size is so nice (i know it's a tad bigger than the 701), but I'd probably spend $650-$700 on it, battery, and S&H, and for that much I can get so much more in a normal laptop/desktop.

    Grr, lovely portability vs performance. Why'd it have to cost so much? T_T

    PikaPuff on
    jCyyTSo.png
  • Options
    SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    So, the new eee... no speakers?

    Or are they just hard to see in the picture or something?

    Seeks on
    userbar.jpg
    desura_Userbar.png
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Seeks wrote: »
    So, the new eee... no speakers?

    Or are they just hard to see in the picture or something?

    They're in the bottom part now, apparently.

    man, I want one of those 900s so bad. They took the one part of the 700 that I couldn't stand (there's so much panel space but the screen is so small with that border!) and fixed it. Oh, and the Linux version has 20GB of Flash storage. (Windows version only gets 12).

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Huh. Awesome.

    Seeks on
    userbar.jpg
    desura_Userbar.png
  • Options
    PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Wierd. So the 901 has two hard drives in it; a 16gb with a 4gb for linux version (20gb total), and a 8gb with a 4gb for the windows version(12gb total).

    PikaPuff on
    jCyyTSo.png
  • Options
    TheMorningStarTheMorningStar Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I want to get the eeePC 900. When are they suppose to be out in the US? And how much?

    TheMorningStar on
  • Options
    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I want to get the eeePC 900. When are they suppose to be out in the US? And how much?

    May 12th is the release date, $550 USD. Expect supply shortages and delays.

    Brolo on
  • Options
    TheMorningStarTheMorningStar Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    :( for how long possibly? I was thinking about getting one in August.

    TheMorningStar on
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    :( for how long possibly? I was thinking about getting one in August.

    You'll probably be fine if you don't need it before the end of May, really.

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    PikaPuff wrote: »
    Wierd. So the 901 has two hard drives in it; a 16gb with a 4gb for linux version (20gb total), and a 8gb with a 4gb for the windows version(12gb total).

    The 4GB one is apparently extra-fast flash for storing the OS, while the extra 16GB (or 8GB for the suckers) is there for user data and stuff that doesn't need fast access time (although the large flash is still as fast as the flash in the 700).

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    US Site selling pre-orders on 900. This is the "20gb" linux version. Too lazy to fetch the windows xp link.

    PikaPuff on
    jCyyTSo.png
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    $589? What the fuck happened to $549?

    edit: also, I love the translation
    PotatoMan: potato editor for children.

    That's right. It's a "potato editor".

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    $589? Fuck.

    PikaPuff on
    jCyyTSo.png
  • Options
    TheMorningStarTheMorningStar Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I've heard bad things about that site...

    Anyways, I checked out the 7" model today at a best buy...I'm really glad I did. It is WAY too small for me. I don't think I would enjoy writing an essay on that thing, no matter how used to it I got. I think I may just save a little longer and get a macbook like I was planning....

    TheMorningStar on
  • Options
    Monolithic_DomeMonolithic_Dome Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    also the HP Mini Note looks promising

    Monolithic_Dome on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I've heard bad things about that site...

    Anyways, I checked out the 7" model today at a best buy...I'm really glad I did. It is WAY too small for me. I don't think I would enjoy writing an essay on that thing, no matter how used to it I got. I think I may just save a little longer and get a macbook like I was planning....

    It's definitely not for everyone. Depending on the size of your hands (mine are about medium), you may or may not be able to touch-type on it.

    Brolo on
  • Options
    precisionkprecisionk Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    So beyond size and solid state hard drive, what is the different between the new $599 PC and a comparable one from say HP that is pretty much the same price with more power and the like? Portability?

    precisionk on
  • Options
    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    precisionk wrote: »
    So beyond size and solid state hard drive, what is the different between the new $599 PC and a comparable one from say HP that is pretty much the same price with more power and the like? Portability?

    The biggest difference is the size and the weight. It's also fairly free of the bloatware that's pre-installed on most laptops.

    Brolo on
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    precisionk wrote: »
    So beyond size and solid state hard drive, what is the different between the new $599 PC and a comparable one from say HP that is pretty much the same price with more power and the like? Portability?

    The EEE is 9" diagonal and 2 lbs, your average $600 brick from HP or Dell will be 15" and at least 6 lbs. Granted, for the extra size and weight you get a real hard drive, a bigger screen, etc. Tradeoffs are the way life works.

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    FlapkeFlapke Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    also the HP Mini Note looks promising

    It LOOKS promising, but it performs like some kind of horrible cross between a snail and a sloth, leaving a trail of slimy disappointment behind.

    Nice screen though.

    Flapke on
  • Options
    FrazFraz Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Just picked up a refurbished Black 4G on Amazon for $327. Upped the RAM to 1GB with a stick I had laying around.

    I have a legit XP key and a copy of Office 2003 laying around, but I'm not sure if I want to install it. Are you guys happy with the stock OS?

    Fraz on
  • Options
    PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    it's preference. I don't have one, but I'm damn sure i'm putting windows on there.

    PikaPuff on
    jCyyTSo.png
  • Options
    Mustachio JonesMustachio Jones jerseyRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Mustachio Jones on
  • Options
    DharmaBumDharmaBum Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    How hard is it to upgrade the RAM in these guys?

    Also if I buy a 2GB model is it possible to upgrade it to a bigger HD?

    DharmaBum on
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    DharmaBum wrote: »
    How hard is it to upgrade the RAM in these guys?

    Also if I buy a 2GB model is it possible to upgrade it to a bigger HD?

    RAM is easy to upgrade for the 4GB models and up. The 2GB model has its RAM soldered in.

    You can only upgrade the storage on the 8GB model but you can always put in an SD card for extra room.

    remember, it's not a hard drive, it's flash memory.

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    DharmaBumDharmaBum Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Daedalus wrote: »
    DharmaBum wrote: »
    How hard is it to upgrade the RAM in these guys?

    Also if I buy a 2GB model is it possible to upgrade it to a bigger HD?

    RAM is easy to upgrade for the 4GB models and up. The 2GB model has its RAM soldered in.

    You can only upgrade the storage on the 8GB model but you can always put in an SD card for extra room.

    remember, it's not a hard drive, it's flash memory.

    So it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to buy the 2GB model then, right?

    DharmaBum on
  • Options
    FrazFraz Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    DharmaBum wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    DharmaBum wrote: »
    How hard is it to upgrade the RAM in these guys?

    Also if I buy a 2GB model is it possible to upgrade it to a bigger HD?

    RAM is easy to upgrade for the 4GB models and up. The 2GB model has its RAM soldered in.

    You can only upgrade the storage on the 8GB model but you can always put in an SD card for extra room.

    remember, it's not a hard drive, it's flash memory.

    So it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to buy the 2GB model then, right?

    Not if you want to upgrade the RAM.

    It was really easy. Only laptops I have upgraded were Macs and this was much easier.

    Fraz on
  • Options
    precisionkprecisionk Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    So the question begs, HP Mini-Note or EEE?

    Really tough decision.

    Anyone use the Mini-note?

    precisionk on
  • Options
    PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Yeah I'm having that problem now, too.

    To make it worse, are there any other brands out yet?

    PikaPuff on
    jCyyTSo.png
  • Options
    theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Out of borderline-Linux-fanboy curiosity, what problems did you have with the OS?

    theSquid on
  • Options
    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    theSquid wrote: »
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Out of borderline-Linux-fanboy curiosity, what problems did you have with the OS?

    I did pretty much the same thing - I switched Xandros over to the full KDE desktop, which was better for me, but realized I was still pretty stupid at linux. Couldn't figure out how to get a printer driver insalled, or re-compile my distro to get it to recognize the full 2 gigs of memory, or how to install .gz thingies... admittedly I didn't try very hard to look all this up though.

    Eventually I ran into a situation where I needed to run a windows-specific application (Johnny Lee's Wiimote Lightboard software), and ended up throwing an nlite'd Windows XP Pro install on there, which is running well enough that I'm not really in the mood to take it off.

    Brolo on
  • Options
    DharmaBumDharmaBum Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    So if I want to load XP on one of these guys do I basically need 1gig of RAM?

    DharmaBum on
  • Options
    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    It'll help a lot. With only 512 you're gonna have a tough time running firefox, messenger and pretty much anything else at the same time.

    Brolo on
  • Options
    theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Rolo wrote: »
    theSquid wrote: »
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Out of borderline-Linux-fanboy curiosity, what problems did you have with the OS?

    I did pretty much the same thing - I switched Xandros over to the full KDE desktop, which was better for me, but realized I was still pretty stupid at linux. Couldn't figure out how to get a printer driver insalled, or re-compile my distro to get it to recognize the full 2 gigs of memory, or how to install .gz thingies... admittedly I didn't try very hard to look all this up though.

    Eventually I ran into a situation where I needed to run a windows-specific application (Johnny Lee's Wiimote Lightboard software), and ended up throwing an nlite'd Windows XP Pro install on there, which is running well enough that I'm not really in the mood to take it off.

    Fair enough. I don't have a lot of experience with KDE but I do know that printer drivers can be a bitch. The 2 GB of RAM should be picked up automatically though, Linux distros generally boast about that kind of hardware management. And fair enough about the *.tar.gz, though from what I understand Xandros is Debian-based, so there's always the possibility of searching their package manager before jumping for the old *.tar.gz's.
    But yeah, if you do have to install with *.tar.gz's, you get the fun of doing this in a terminal:
    tar xvfz something.tar.gz
    cd something
    ./configure
    make
    (as root) make install
    So take that as you will

    theSquid on
  • Options
    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    theSquid wrote: »
    Rolo wrote: »
    theSquid wrote: »
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Out of borderline-Linux-fanboy curiosity, what problems did you have with the OS?

    I did pretty much the same thing - I switched Xandros over to the full KDE desktop, which was better for me, but realized I was still pretty stupid at linux. Couldn't figure out how to get a printer driver insalled, or re-compile my distro to get it to recognize the full 2 gigs of memory, or how to install .gz thingies... admittedly I didn't try very hard to look all this up though.

    Eventually I ran into a situation where I needed to run a windows-specific application (Johnny Lee's Wiimote Lightboard software), and ended up throwing an nlite'd Windows XP Pro install on there, which is running well enough that I'm not really in the mood to take it off.

    Fair enough. I don't have a lot of experience with KDE but I do know that printer drivers can be a bitch. The 2 GB of RAM should be picked up automatically though, Linux distros generally boast about that kind of hardware management. And fair enough about the *.tar.gz, though from what I understand Xandros is Debian-based, so there's always the possibility of searching their package manager before jumping for the old *.tar.gz's.
    But yeah, if you do have to install with *.tar.gz's, you get the fun of doing this in a terminal:
    tar xvfz something.tar.gz
    cd something
    ./configure
    make
    (as root) make install
    So take that as you will

    The kernel that ships with the eee is compiled without the "support more than 1GB of RAM" extension. I haven't the slightest idea why; it can't possibly be that noticable of an optimization.

    I plan on wiping the thing as soon as I get it and installing Ubuntu.

    Daedalus on
  • Options
    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    theSquid wrote: »
    Rolo wrote: »
    theSquid wrote: »
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Out of borderline-Linux-fanboy curiosity, what problems did you have with the OS?

    I did pretty much the same thing - I switched Xandros over to the full KDE desktop, which was better for me, but realized I was still pretty stupid at linux. Couldn't figure out how to get a printer driver insalled, or re-compile my distro to get it to recognize the full 2 gigs of memory, or how to install .gz thingies... admittedly I didn't try very hard to look all this up though.

    Eventually I ran into a situation where I needed to run a windows-specific application (Johnny Lee's Wiimote Lightboard software), and ended up throwing an nlite'd Windows XP Pro install on there, which is running well enough that I'm not really in the mood to take it off.

    Fair enough. I don't have a lot of experience with KDE but I do know that printer drivers can be a bitch. The 2 GB of RAM should be picked up automatically though, Linux distros generally boast about that kind of hardware management. And fair enough about the *.tar.gz, though from what I understand Xandros is Debian-based, so there's always the possibility of searching their package manager before jumping for the old *.tar.gz's.
    But yeah, if you do have to install with *.tar.gz's, you get the fun of doing this in a terminal:
    tar xvfz something.tar.gz
    cd something
    ./configure
    make
    (as root) make install
    So take that as you will

    I think I'm just too used to a graphical based UI. Going into a terminal always leaves me with a headache, since I'm not familiar with any but the most basic DOS commands for navigating file structures. The few times I've done it it's been from people just posting instructions to me verbatim, and me re-typing them into the terminal window without really understanding what I was doing.

    At some point, someday, I'll actually just sit down with it and pound my head against it until it all makes sense.

    Brolo on
  • Options
    theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Rolo wrote: »
    theSquid wrote: »
    Rolo wrote: »
    theSquid wrote: »
    The stock OS is good if you're not familiar with Linux and just want to use it for surfing the internet and using an office suite. Anything past that though, and I found that I was battling with the operating system more than with the software itself. I put an nlite'd Windows install(150mb iso woo) on mine and it runs better than Xandros did. To be fair though, I did slap 2gb of ram in. I've successfully installed a wide variety of games on it, but I do have an external DVD drive, so it makes things easier. You can, however, install games to the flash drive with an SD card reader and another computer, so woo hoo to that.

    Out of borderline-Linux-fanboy curiosity, what problems did you have with the OS?

    I did pretty much the same thing - I switched Xandros over to the full KDE desktop, which was better for me, but realized I was still pretty stupid at linux. Couldn't figure out how to get a printer driver insalled, or re-compile my distro to get it to recognize the full 2 gigs of memory, or how to install .gz thingies... admittedly I didn't try very hard to look all this up though.

    Eventually I ran into a situation where I needed to run a windows-specific application (Johnny Lee's Wiimote Lightboard software), and ended up throwing an nlite'd Windows XP Pro install on there, which is running well enough that I'm not really in the mood to take it off.

    Fair enough. I don't have a lot of experience with KDE but I do know that printer drivers can be a bitch. The 2 GB of RAM should be picked up automatically though, Linux distros generally boast about that kind of hardware management. And fair enough about the *.tar.gz, though from what I understand Xandros is Debian-based, so there's always the possibility of searching their package manager before jumping for the old *.tar.gz's.
    But yeah, if you do have to install with *.tar.gz's, you get the fun of doing this in a terminal:
    tar xvfz something.tar.gz
    cd something
    ./configure
    make
    (as root) make install
    So take that as you will

    I think I'm just too used to a graphical based UI. Going into a terminal always leaves me with a headache, since I'm not familiar with any but the most basic DOS commands for navigating file structures. The few times I've done it it's been from people just posting instructions to me verbatim, and me re-typing them into the terminal window without really understanding what I was doing.

    At some point, someday, I'll actually just sit down with it and pound my head against it until it all makes sense.

    Well that's just what Debian-based distros such as Xandros and Ubuntu were supposed to get rid of with the repository system. Either you'd have something like Synaptic or Adept that you can just search for programs or install with a click, or if you must you can go into the terminal and type
    sudo apt-get install azureus
    But the ./configure && make thing regards automatic compilation of the source code of programs, and usually applies to either ancient and unused programs like Siag Office or ones that have yet to take off or are in alpha like Swiftfox (or your own programs, if you're a developer) Any other programs will usually have some debian repository set up including Skype, Wine, etc.

    theSquid on
This discussion has been closed.