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Long distance wireless bridge?

midgetspymidgetspy Registered User regular
Hey all,

I live in an apartment building. My brother in-law lives down the hall from me, about 6 suites down (and across the hall). The distance is maybe 100m, with many walls in between. I want to bridge our local networks so we can share files without running down the hall with an external HD. So I have 2 questions about this:

1) Routing

Currently we each have a local LAN behind a DSL modem/router. We only want to join our local networks, but we still want our internet-enabled devices (PC, PS3, xbox, etc) to use our own DSL connections. Am I correct in thinking that this could be accomplished by having both routers on the local network and forcing our devices to each use a specific one as their gateway?

2) Wireless

So I've seen stories about people transmitting wireless ethernet signals many miles with custom antennas and whatnot. What would it take to bridge our networks together? Basically we want to have 2 physical networks that are connected with a long distance wireless connection. What hardware would we need? Transfer speed isn't critical but it'd be nice if it was at least ~20mbit.... 10mbit would do in a pinch. Less than that and it's not really worth it.

midgetspy on

Posts

  • Nakatomi2010Nakatomi2010 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Biggest problem you're going to run into is that you're trying bridge two networks while maintaing your own individual networks... The logistics behind this would be a bit complicated as you'll run into a scenario the two routers conflicting as they try to assign the computers on your networks IP addresses... The computers wont know who they're talking to.... Best thing to do would be to get a wireless bridge up and running, spring for a better internet connection type and split the cost 70/30 since you'll get a better conenction to it.....


    Obviously there are corporate devices that'll probably do what you do, but seeming as how they're typically designed for corporations they're likely to not be inexpensive...

    Nakatomi2010 on
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  • midgetspymidgetspy Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Both routers would run with DHCP off so we shouldn't have a problem with IPs, we'll just assign statically out of our own separate ranges.

    I'm more concerned about the wireless bridge, I can't seem to find somewhere that sells what I want... maybe I'm just not searching for the right thing. Does anybody have any store/site/make/model suggestions I should look at? Price isn't the hugest deal because we'll be splitting it, and I'm aware it's going to cost a bit of money.

    midgetspy on
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Since you are shooting through walls at a bad angle, you're probably going to need a directional antenna on each end. Each side will need a wireless bridge. If you really want your own networks with individual gateways on each side, you will need to have at least one side statically addressed since you can't have two DHCP servers on a single subnet (since you're not putting a router in between). But if you can get the wireless connection reliable enough, it would be better to just have a single DSL gateway router w/DHCP.

    Edit: A wireless bridge will make your two networks into a single LAN segment. You can't have different subnet addresses on each side without a router in between (your machines won't talk if they're on different subnets). The static addressing is just to give the machines on each side a different gateway address to use.

    Setups like this will probably cost you at least $500. But this is based on experience with corporate deployments. We typically run 5-15 mile high-bandwidth point-to-point microwave connections at $5000-15000 per link, so I don't have any recommendations for budget equipment.

    SiliconStew on
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  • Nakatomi2010Nakatomi2010 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    You can't assign IPs staticly with DHCP off... If DHCP is off its just going to act as a switch without assignin any IPs, period....

    Nakatomi2010 on
    Check out me building my HTPC (NSF56K) (Updated 1-10-08)
    Movie Collection
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    Holy shit! Sony's new techno toy!
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  • midgetspymidgetspy Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Um... DHCP on or off has nothing to do with whether computers can use static IPs or not. Also, DHCP off will definitely not make the router act as a switch. It will always be a router and perform NAT to the hosts behind it, whether DHCP is on or off.

    In any case I'm satisfied that the routing won't be a problem, I'm now just trying to figure out what kind of hardware I need on both sides to actually bridge the networks.

    midgetspy on
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