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The Classical Music Thread

PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
edited August 2007 in Debate and/or Discourse
I'll get the discussion started.



What do you think is Wagner's greatest achievement. I've gotta go with Tristan. Even though it's less grandiose than Der Ring, it's never bloated, and the motif usage is absolutely perfect.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    <3

    That said, I've listened to very little Wagner. Anywhere I can get some good clips?

    Also, for those who don't know: www.classiccat.net is a great website where you can download classical music free and legally.

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    ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited January 2006
    The greatest trick that Wagner pulled was to convince the world that he didn't exist.

    ...

    Sorry, I know dick about Wagner. I'm a Beethoven man, myself. Also, Lizst.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Also, Lizst.
    I only know him for Hungarian Rhapsodies. Anything else of note?

    Also, to answer my own question, here is the prelude to Tristan by the Columbia University Orchestra: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cuo/F2000-1.mp3

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    The greatest trick that Wagner pulled was to convince the world that he didn't exist.

    Nice refference.

    ElJeffe wrote:
    Sorry, I know dick about Wagner. I'm a Beethoven man, myself. Also, Lizst.

    Well, Wagner loved and emulated Beethoven and marrie Lizst's niece (or daughter, some relation) so he sounds like your man!

    Basic Wagner info:

    Turned Opera into a "serious" artform

    Was also a supreme dramatist, considered his Opera musical dramas.

    Single handedly changed music with his uses of the famous Leitmotifs. (Just think of Ride of the Valkyries.)

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    Dyrwen66Dyrwen66 the other's insane Denver CORegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    The greatest trick that Wagner pulled was to convince the world that he didn't exist.
    Well, hey, if you ever see something called a "Wagner Festival". Go. You'll enjoy the 20 hours of one goddamn opera. One. Each Act is like 2-4 hours long.

    On to the topic, can't say I like much Wagner really, though I appreciate his creation of motifs with his works. I think I like Bizet a bit more since he's easier to grab onto without much effort.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Dyrwen66 wrote:
    ElJeffe wrote:
    The greatest trick that Wagner pulled was to convince the world that he didn't exist.
    Well, hey, if you ever see something called a "Wagner Festival". Go. You'll enjoy the 20 hours of one goddamn opera. One. Each Act is like 2-4 hours long.

    On to the topic, can't say I like much Wagner really, though I appreciate his creation of motifs with his works. I think I like Bizet a bit more since he's easier to grab onto without much effort.
    Yeah, Bizet's really accessible but also good. So is Rossini, for that matter.

    Probably the king of operatic accessibility (while still making really good music) was Grieg, though.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Dyrwen66 wrote:
    ElJeffe wrote:
    The greatest trick that Wagner pulled was to convince the world that he didn't exist.
    Well, hey, if you ever see something called a "Wagner Festival". Go. You'll enjoy the 20 hours of one goddamn opera. One. Each Act is like 2-4 hours long.

    On to the topic, can't say I like much Wagner really, though I appreciate his creation of motifs with his works. I think I like Bizet a bit more since he's easier to grab onto without much effort.
    Yeah, Bizet's really accessible but also good. So is Rossini, for that matter.

    *Sings the theme to the Lone Ranger. Then thinks of Leonard Bernstein yelling at little kids*

    Yeah...Wagner takes a little while to get into. However, he can be understood right away. I remember when I first heard the prelude to Tristan. It came up on my iTunes in shuffle while I was falling asleep. I couldn't believe the beauty the tension created. It was like an intellectual orgasm.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    The key to listening to composers from Beethoven on is to find a good conductor. For instance, I like like Bernstein for Mahler and Beethoven (his Tristan's prelude is divine, but the singers are lacking) but he sucks for Webern. Klieber does a good Trisan, but not a good Flying Dutchmen. Solti does a great ring, but it's not live.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Hey, you know what I can't stand but most people like? Barber's Adagio for Strings. I never understood why people liked that piece so much.

    Oh yeah, I just remembered. I've posted this before, but everyone should download this. It's the first movement of Elgar's Cello Concerto in E Minor by Jacqueline du Pré with the London Symphony Orchestra. It's particularly impressive because she was 16 at the time.

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    ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited January 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Also, Lizst.
    I only know him for Hungarian Rhapsodies. Anything else of note?

    Yes.

    I have no idea what any of it is called, though. I suck at titles to songs. I really suck at titles to songs that don't even have words. But I have a CD of Lizst, and it's roughly 70 minutes of cool.

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    I quite like Vivaldi, particularly his Bassoon pieces. Of course, not to discount the Four Seasons, but they're sort of a given.

    Then of course you have Chopin's endless preludes, Mozart's concertos, Beethoven's symphonies...

    Mussorgsky's (and Ravel's) Pictures at an Exhibition is one of my favourite suites.




    There, I've done my obligatory name-tossing post, so now I can start to actually comment on things posted.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    stilist wrote:
    I quite like Vivaldi, particularly his Bassoon pieces. Of course, not to discount the Four Seasons, but they're sort of a given.
    Vivaldi is so very very Baroque. There's almost no way to describe this besides "ridiculous" : http://www.minnesotaorchestra.org/audio/VIVALDI_Piccolo_Concerto.mp3. Although he did write some stuff for recorder that's pretty interesting, if only because it's for recorder.

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    bongibongi regular
    edited January 2006
    Despite being a relatively modern piece of music, I submit that anyone that isn't moved by the end of Agnus Dei, that final deafening crescendo, is in fact soulless.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    bongi wrote:
    Despite being a relatively modern piece of music, I submit that anyone that isn't moved by the end of Agnus Dei, that final deafening crescendo, is in fact soulless.
    You could probably make a house out of all the music called "Agnus Dei." Composer?

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    ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited January 2006
    bongi wrote:
    Despite being a relatively modern piece of music, I submit that anyone that isn't moved by the end of Agnus Dei, that final deafening crescendo, is in fact soulless.
    You could probably make a house out of all the music called "Agnus Dei." Composer?

    I really like Canon. You know, by that guy. ;)

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    bongibongi regular
    edited January 2006
    bongi wrote:
    Despite being a relatively modern piece of music, I submit that anyone that isn't moved by the end of Agnus Dei, that final deafening crescendo, is in fact soulless.
    You could probably make a house out of all the music called "Agnus Dei." Composer?
    Oh, sorry, I was replying to the Adagio for Strings related post above (in a terribly nebulous way). I mean the choral composition of whichever movement it is that has become so popular.

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    flamebroiledchickenflamebroiledchicken Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    According to my friend who knows about music, Mozart's Requiem has the best deceptive cadence ever.

    I don't know what that means but there you go.

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    Bob The MonkeyBob The Monkey Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Someone tell me where to get started with Classical music (by which I mean, anything from the beginning of Baroque to the end of Romantic). I enjoy Bach's Tocatta and Fugue Suite, Beethoven... generally minor stuff with a darker feel.

    What other composers have written great stuff that I might like, and what pieces in particular?

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    Peter EbelPeter Ebel CopenhagenRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    I happend to catch this years New Years concert by the Wiener Philharmonika on tv. They were doing some Strauß. It was good. Like "and he saw it was good" good.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Someone tell me where to get started with Classical music (by which I mean, anything from the beginning of Baroque to the end of Romantic). I enjoy Bach's Tocatta and Fugue Suite, Beethoven... generally minor stuff with a darker feel.

    What other composers have written great stuff that I might like, and what pieces in particular?

    This was stated somewhere else a while back, but Gustav Holst's The Planets is a great symphony. A great way to get some comlpex, but easily understandable symphonies is by listening to Haydn. Especially after symphony no. 88. I'd say find which period interests you the most. If you like Baroque, (as in Bach) then check out Bach's Brandenberg Concerti (perfect) and Handel. Vivaldi can be nice, but he cen be pretty simple. For classical periods, I like Mozart's later symphonies, some Concerti, def. his Requiem, Haydn, and early Beethoven. (Piano sonata up to the pathetique, symophonies up to his 3rd/4th, early concerti.) Romantic music is my forte, and I love too many musicians to list. Modern music can be very hard to get into, yet sometimes very easy. The first piece of classical music I really loved and understood was Stravinski's Rite. So check out the Rite of Spring and Berg's Violin Concerto to hear some modern music.

    But for anyone really interested in learning about Classical Music and has about $120 to spare , I'd definitely advise them to check out Bernstein's Young People's Concerts on DVD. You might be able to get them from the Library, however. He's teaching little kids, but he might as well be teaching adults. You'll learn so much form each concert, it's amazing.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    Well Twinkle, Twinkle isn't bad.

    Seriously though, are you mad?

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?
    I know I like his stuff. The Requiem is pretty damned good, though.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Fencingsax wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    Well Twinkle, Twinkle isn't bad.

    Seriously though, are you mad?

    Prove me wrong.



    (I'm trying to think of a smiley to demonstrate the lightheartedness of that statement.)

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    Well Twinkle, Twinkle isn't bad.

    Seriously though, are you mad?

    Prove me wrong.



    (I'm trying to think of a smiley to demonstrate the lightheartedness of that statement.)

    Figaro and Don Giovanni don't catch your fancy?

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Fencingsax wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    Well Twinkle, Twinkle isn't bad.

    Seriously though, are you mad?

    Prove me wrong.



    (I'm trying to think of a smiley to demonstrate the lightheartedness of that statement.)

    Figaro and Don Giovanni don't catch your fancy?

    Well, not when there's giant segments of just talking.

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?
    Well Twinkle, Twinkle isn't bad.

    Seriously though, are you mad?
    Prove me wrong.
    Paris Symphony, Turkish March (lol overplayed), Piano Sonata 11 are some I like especially.

    Of course, I'm horrible at recommending music.

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    MukaikuboMukaikubo Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae. [/i]

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae. [/i]

    Beethoven's 9th. Seriously. I can't help but dance for joy when I hear it.

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.

    Is that thor choral piece that goes: dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun duun duuun dun dun?

    Fencingsax on
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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Fencingsax wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.
    Is that thor choral piece that goes: dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun duun duuun dun dun?
    Clip of the song

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    stilist wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.
    Is that thor choral piece that goes: dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun duun duuun dun dun?
    Clip of the song

    That's the one.

    Fencingsax on
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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Fencingsax wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.
    Is that thor choral piece that goes: dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun duun duuun dun dun?
    Clip of the song
    That's the one.
    It's pretty hard to tell what somebody means by dun and daa, so I figured this was the easiest way. :)

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    stilist wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.
    Is that thor choral piece that goes: dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun dun. dadada dun dun dun duun duuun dun dun?
    Clip of the song
    That's the one.
    It's pretty hard to tell what somebody means by dun and daa, so I figured this was the easiest way. :)

    That's the joke.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Bartók was the man. <3<3 I've yet to hear anything by him that was anything short of awesome.

    Oh man, that 4th String Quartet. <3

    Speaking of string quartets, Beethoven's Grosse Fuge is the best thing ever.

    Best thing ever.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Bartók was the man. <3<3 I've yet to hear anything by him that was anything short of awesome.

    Oh man, that 4th String Quartet. <3

    Speaking of string quartets, Beethoven's Grosse Fuge is the best thing ever.

    Best thing ever.


    :^: :^: :^: :^:

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    I enjoy the 40th a lot.

    Can anyone recommend Stravinsky? I have the Rite, Firebird, Petrouchka, Pulcinella, and the three symphonies. After hearing the utter godliness that is the Symphony of Psalms, I need more.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Double post.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    I enjoy the 40th a lot.

    Can anyone recommend Stravinsky? I have the Rite, Firebird, Petrouchka, Pulcinella, and the three symphonies. After hearing the utter godliness that is the Symphony of Psalms, I need more.

    Well you have mostly earlier Stravinsky. Symphony of Psalms is towards later Stravisnky, when he adopted Neoclassicism and Serialism. Try his Concerto in D. I love that.

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